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LadyWillowHawk
August 22nd, 2005, 03:09 PM
:smile: I posted this message in the book forum as well, hoping to get some help.


I was wondering if anyone had info on the standards and laws of writng a book. I am writing a true story and I didn't want to name names, only organizations. I am from Canada so the laws will probably be different, but I don't know where to look or what to call my search. Any help would be appreciated. _catroll_
BB
LadyWillowHawk

Yasmine Galenorn
August 22nd, 2005, 03:57 PM
:smile: I posted this message in the book forum as well, hoping to get some help.


I was wondering if anyone had info on the standards and laws of writng a book. I am writing a true story and I didn't want to name names, only organizations. I am from Canada so the laws will probably be different, but I don't know where to look or what to call my search. Any help would be appreciated. _catroll_
BB
LadyWillowHawk

I suggest you start with a book called "The Writer's Legal Guide" by Tad Crawford and Tony Lyons. And if you search on the net for info like this, do NOT go by anything unless it's on a professional writing organization's site, or a professional legal site, because there's a LOT of misinformation out there and you must be sure you don't mess up and get yourself sued. You'll probably want to consult a legal entertainment lawyer who would be versed in the subject. It will cost you, but not as much as a lawsuit for libel, and any publisher you approach--any worth their salt--will want to make sure you aren't setting them up for a lawsuit, either.

Good luck!
Yasmine G. :colorful:

ILOVEAUTUMNS
August 22nd, 2005, 07:20 PM
where can we find a legal entertainment lawyer?????
are they in the yellow pages... if so.....
I can't find them!!!!????

Yasmine Galenorn
August 22nd, 2005, 08:34 PM
where can we find a legal entertainment lawyer?????
are they in the yellow pages... if so.....
I can't find them!!!!????

You look for lawyers that specialize in entertainment law. I know one, who is with a very reputable firm, but be aware--they aren't cheap and they usually don't work pro bono. However, they're worth it when and if you reach the stage where you really are looking at publishing something that could be considered potentially controversial with regards to people, etc. mentioned in the book, or if you don't have an agent and you receive an offer of a contract from a publisher/film maker, etc..

Graybill & English (http://www.graybillandenglish.com/) is the firm I recommend, but there are a lot of qualified lawyers out there. Just look under attorneys for one specializing in entertainment law.

Yasmine :colorful:

ILOVEAUTUMNS
August 24th, 2005, 12:09 PM
Yasmine,
you are so very sweet to help us out like this!!!!!
You might just change my life with the info you have given me!!!
I am in the midst of writing a book!!!!
I'd like to know one more thing.....where could I look for publishers to send my
material to? is there a book or manual that has lists?
thanks again!!!
Heather

Yasmine Galenorn
August 24th, 2005, 12:51 PM
Yasmine,
you are so very sweet to help us out like this!!!!!
You might just change my life with the info you have given me!!!
I am in the midst of writing a book!!!!
I'd like to know one more thing.....where could I look for publishers to send my
material to? is there a book or manual that has lists?
thanks again!!!
Heather

Terribly busy, so making a running pass through here. I have a list of recommended reading for aspiring writers on my site. http://www.galenorn.com/teashop/default.asp?body=asrrlist.htm

I HIGHLY--from many years of professional writing--recommend that you read a good share of these books and others like them before you attempt to market a book. Publishing is a tough, and sometimes harsh, business and you MUST know what you're doing if you want to make it as a writer. It takes a lot more than just typing out a manuscript to get it published. So read, read, read, and pay attention. And yes, the current year of Writers Market can be found in the library's reference section, and it includes the specs and regs for thousands of publishers, both book and magazine. PAY ATTENTION TO THEM....if you don't follow their rules, the publisher will dump your manuscript without reading it--they get thousands of submissions every year, and the majority are no where near being ready to market.

If you send one sample chapter when they say send three, if you send the whole manuscript when they say send a query, if you forget to send an SASE for reply...you are burning your own bridges. And if you don't know what any of that means, then get reading on those recommended books--*you* have to do the legwork, if you want to be a writer. It means study, perseverance, and developing a thick skin because rejection is common in traditional publishing (I'm not talking about vanity press--self publishing--here), and you have to get used to it and not take it personally.

NOTE: It takes an average of 5-10 years of steady writing on a regular, disciplined level, for most writers to break into print with a legitimate publisher, and not everybody has the talent. But if you do have talent, and you apply self-discipline and you keep on in spite of rejections, then you have a much better chance of making it. And this may not set well with some people, but the fact is that self-publishing is--with very rare exception--a last resort, and traditional publishers tend to avoid writers who've gone that route, especially for fiction or non-esoteric nonfiction.

Good luck, and go make a trip to the library. *grins*

Yasmine :colorful:

ILOVEAUTUMNS
August 24th, 2005, 05:33 PM
thank you Yasmine!!!!!!!!
I got a lot of reading to do lol ;)
thanks again for helping us out!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Fyre_Nymph
August 24th, 2005, 08:12 PM
I personally feel that you should choose a subject tht you can stick to, maybe something that reminds you of your real life. Pick a character(s) that you can keep up with, who you know what they're going through and you can cooperate with and create a lifestyle you and the charcter can agree wit. Think of the character(s) as yourself. Time periods also make a big differace. They will effect how the character(s) talk, act, and communicate in general. This will also effect the clothing and thir sense of style. I mean, a goth in 1855 would just be completely stupid, unless they were sent back in time for some reason or another. I can say a bunch more, and if you need advice, just PM me.