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Haerfest Leah
September 24th, 2005, 10:27 AM
Do you always use the herbs, plants & foods listed on correspondence lists as it says its for? And how many of them do you actually ever use?

These lists can be awful long, lots I've never seen or without a local organic or herb store will never get my hands on so I only use very common stuff (wal-mart garden section or grocery store herbs). Growing it is an option but my thumb is still quite brown it seems although I'm getting better. So I'm best with herbs in dried & oil form (love aromatherapy). I'm going to start growing some in pots and keep at it, can I start indoor window stuff at any time of year from seeds?

It seems that lists of correspondence stuff can vary, is there a list you recommend online I can print for my kitchen that you think its pretty accurate, I may also add stuff from my Green Witchcraft book or other places online and make 1 nice long list to put in my witchy grimoire. I love to cook with my intuition and hate sticking to recipees strictly so I know you don't always have to follow or use what a list says.

Ok I'm done, hehe :p

SoulHealer
September 24th, 2005, 10:34 AM
I don't use lists -the way I was taught about herbs I don't need them (apart from medical info)

I use as many as I think I need

Haerfest Leah
September 24th, 2005, 10:41 AM
I don't use lists -the way I was taught about herbs I don't need them (apart from medical info)

I use as many as I think I need

I see what you mean, I wasn't taught about them by anyone so all I know I've taught myself. Other than my aromatherapy encyclopedia I have Ann Mouras 1st Green Witchcraft book, I have the other 2 on my Amazon wish list but not sure when I'll get to buy them.

BrigidMoon
September 24th, 2005, 10:51 AM
I feel that kitchen craft is best when you go with your gut. Maybe I'm wrong but I love to cook and love to mix stuff up esp. herbs. I don't know if I would call myself a kitchen witch but I think that's in any of us that cook at least a little bit :)

Haerfest Leah
September 24th, 2005, 10:56 AM
I feel that kitchen craft is best when you go with your gut. Maybe I'm wrong but I love to cook and love to mix stuff up esp. herbs. I don't know if I would call myself a kitchen witch but I think that's in any of us that cook at least a little bit :)

I agree. I'm just starting kitchen witchery and I love how its so versatile (use whats on hand) but hence why I started this thread.

SoulHealer
September 24th, 2005, 11:04 AM
Try blind tasting some of them (obviously make sure you know they aren't dangerous) and think what it brings to mind -what you think it would be like as person or animal, what colour it would be, what personality and then what you think it would be useful for

BrigidMoon
September 24th, 2005, 11:10 AM
I found this thought it was cool:

http://www.pagannews.com/top_freestuff.shtml (http://www.pagannews.com/top_freestuff.shtml)

There is this herb selector database.

Xirian
September 24th, 2005, 11:38 AM
I have lists that I made but I don't use them. They are pretty much just taking up space on my computer. I use my intiuation when it comes to using herbs in a magical setting. The same goes with cooking. In a medicinal setting I use books to guide me.

Haerfest Leah
September 24th, 2005, 11:44 AM
Thanks BrigdMoon, I haven't been to Pagan News in a while.

BrigidMoon
September 24th, 2005, 11:46 AM
Thanks BrigdMoon, I haven't been to Pagan News in a while.

You're welcome hon :)

Nitefalle
July 25th, 2007, 03:04 PM
You know, this is a really great question that a lot of newbies come across - where do the correspondence lists end and your own personal knowledge begin? Especially as there are so many correspondence lists out there that seem to contradict each other (not to mention they don't list their sources a lot of the time).

So - when did everyone else feel they could make the jump from book knowledge to intuition? Do you still supplement with books? Is there a recommendation you can make to newbies?

aluokaloo
July 25th, 2007, 03:38 PM
well as a KW I started off with listed correspondances, but also I began to realize that everyone views food differently, for example white rice for me has always been a comfort food, it is always made me feel better, so if I was ever down in the dumps I could do a little magick in the kitchen and make myself better by making white rice. It's a little bit of half and half I think.

Lajmar
July 25th, 2007, 05:30 PM
Correspondences can be useful, particularly if learning the doctrine of signatures, however I prefer to let the plants themselves tell me what they can do:-)

Nitefalle
July 26th, 2007, 09:41 AM
When I was first starting out on this path, I was one of those who collected correspondence lists, as if the very possession of them would permit me to absorb all the info through osmosis or something. And then they sat there.....for many months.....without me looking at them at all. Finally, I was going through my little binder in which I had collected all this information and realized it was pretty useless to me because I never looked at it and it was so overwhelming, I'd never memorize all of it. So I chucked it and started actually practicing my path, planting and working with herbs and the info slowly started to trickle into my stubborn brain. Now, I only hit the books if it's a plant that is unfamiliar to me.

Isabella LeCour
July 31st, 2007, 07:25 PM
Hmm. I didn't get into herbs from a magical perspective. I started in pratical uses, like teas, dyes, perfumes, oils, flavorings, spices, potpourri, and flower pressing. Ah wonderful stuff. Then I moved on to medicinal use of herbs which by far much harder to do safely. I'm still working on my nine herbs, I'm working on learning them inside and out.

For me magical use is just an outreach of what I already know. Most often I just use what feels right and it really depends on what I have on hand. I'm just not the type to run out and get some "special" herb for a ritual or a spell. Unless I was creating a potpourri then I'd be a bit more choosey.

There is a lot of different crafts out there when working with herbs. It just depends on what you want. There is just as much dangerous infomation out there too as there is good. Just please throw out the "doctrine of signatures" if your working with medicinal aspects or even culinary. It's more historical trivia than currently useful. It's just one of my pet peaves.

Xirian
August 9th, 2007, 12:43 PM
Do you always use the herbs, plants & foods listed on correspondence lists as it says its for?
No, I don't.

And how many of them do you actually ever use?
I use a lot of herbs in my cooking, but those products are not the only items that I cook with that I draw energy from. Most of the time I draw energy from the food products, the utensils, the elements of the stove and herbs. But I use herbs in almost everything I cook whether it be sweet or savory.


These lists can be awful long, lots I've never seen or without a local organic or herb store will never get my hands on so I only use very common stuff (wal-mart garden section or grocery store herbs). Growing it is an option but my thumb is still quite brown it seems although I'm getting better. So I'm best with herbs in dried & oil form (love aromatherapy). I'm going to start growing some in pots and keep at it, can I start indoor window stuff at any time of year from seeds?
I have before, but it was a very strong herb and would have probably grown under any conditions. I would start off with something like that. A

I also feel the point of me using herbs from around here is that I use foods that are grown around here as well. It's not like I'm cooking with foods and herbs where I have to purchase or grow herbs that are not native to my area. I think that using what we have around us is just as important as experienmenting with other types of non-native elements. Even though they are common, many things can be made with them and they really can enhance so many different things. I guess I start thinking of the Native Americans and how they really used what they had that was right in front of them and came up with medicines, foods, clothing all sorts of things. I find that fascinating and try to look at my surroundings in such a way as much as possible.


It seems that lists of correspondence stuff can vary, is there a list you recommend online I can print for my kitchen that you think its pretty accurate, I may also add stuff from my Green Witchcraft book or other places online and make 1 nice long list to put in my witchy grimoire. I love to cook with my intuition and hate sticking to recipees strictly so I know you don't always have to follow or use what a list says.

Ok I'm done, hehe :p
I go with my gut. I might look online for something, but in the end I go with my gut. I usually already know what I want to use the herb for and many times I'll look online and find that's what they use it for. But for the herbs I use the most, I have given them their own properties and I tend not to vary from that. I really just go by the energy I feel that it gives off when I put it into the food. Not very scientific, but the more I work with herbs, the more I feel better about letting my intuition help me along.

I'll many times see that herbs online are used for different things or see lists on forums where herbs are used for different things, but for me and my family, they work the way that they work for me and would probably no longer work any other way because it's so engrained into my mind that it has these particular uses and meanings.

Wish I could be of more help there.

Maia Al'Dair
September 4th, 2007, 11:35 AM
I too have a habit of collecting those correspondence tables and lists, 8O

My introduction to herbs was through culinary herbs grown for cooking and making beverages (an aunt of mine has a green thumb of impressive proportions).

I haven't really used the lists, because I'm not likely to run to the store to buy something I don't have on hand. I have to confess I'd love to have a wall o' bottles and jars and pots full of mysterious things. lol

I used to have a small herb garden, but we moved. So I'm learning the land in our new place, and each year we're changing a bit here, adding a bit there. Eventually I'll be growing most anything I would want or need. Well, the ones that will survive the climate that is. Some things won't be planted for years, since my youngest child tends to sample the world via mouth. Being almost 3, you'd think the novelty would have worn off... but meanwhile, I won't have such plants as Foxglove.

I should mention that some things I consider magical herbs, and some culinary herbs, though some culinary herbs are also magical. So I would grow Foxgloves for magic and fairies, but not for ingesting.


For growing herbs, as a beginner it might be easier to buy a small potted plant than to start from seed. Unless a pot label says to keep it moist, let the soil on the top of the pot dry out in between waterings.

I've had a lot of success in ignoring thyme, mint, sage and chives. :hehehehe: I was told that French Tarragon is hard to grow and easy to kill, but I bought a plant when living at my old house, and stuck it in the earth, and the thing *thrived*. I had a Tarragon Shrub. And I ignored it along with all the others.

I would say not to give up if a plant dies in your care. Just try something else. I have the worst time trying to grow things like Jade plants or Aloes. I've almost worked up the nerve to try growing an aloe again.

Lolair
September 7th, 2007, 12:12 PM
Most of the online herb correspondence lists come from Cunningham's herbal books, and the food correspondences most like come from his Wicca in the Kitchen book. If you want to create your OWN correspondence list then head out of the occult section of your bookstore or library into the botany and folklore sections. Look for books on the folklore of flowers, plants, and foods - they do exist and I have read them. I find it much more satisfying to know the why and the history behind a correspondence then simply being told that "tomatoes are a love food just because my list from the internet say so". Use the information you find to compile your own associations for foods and herbs backed up with the history and lore you found and put it in your BOS or notebook for later reference.

If you dig even deeper and get into Ethnobotany - indigenous use of plants for medicines and foods - you will find that many Native cultures had their own individual instincts and associations for different plants and had a working relationship with each one that was different from their peers' relationship with the same plant. This was usually on top of the common associations or food use. So learn the history and both the magical and medicinal uses for plants, but also build a working relationship with the plants you use - how do they work for YOU? If you don't believe in an association then it won't work, so practice what you believe and what you feel on top of the knowledge you learn - that is what we call wisdom.

Blessings,
Lolair

tribalesque
October 13th, 2007, 10:37 PM
If you want to create your OWN correspondence list then head out of the occult section of your bookstore or library into the botany and folklore sections. Look for books on the folklore of flowers, plants, and foods - they do exist and I have read them.

Do you happen to remember titles or authors that would be useful to check out, Lolair?

Philosophia
October 13th, 2007, 10:47 PM
I tend to create my own correspondence lists because, living in Australia, its not always the right climate for some herbs and we have a huge range that are native here that aren't included in those tables. Also, I've found some herbs to be different to what their supposed correspondences are when I worked with them, e.g. Sandlewood helps me concentrate a lot more than any other herb.

Learn about the herbs you want to work, slightly experiment on each one, and be comfortable. You don't need to stick with those lists if you don't want to or can't find the herbs you need.

:hugz:

Philosophia
October 13th, 2007, 11:13 PM
So - when did everyone else feel they could make the jump from book knowledge to intuition?

When I started to actively pursue herbalism, I found it became too difficult in either finding the herb or not agreeing with the correspondence. I did my own research with herbal books and little experimentation.


Do you still supplement with books?

For information, yes.


Is there a recommendation you can make to newbies?

I would recommend:
"Herbcraft : cultivation and use of herbs in Australia" - Nerys Purchon
"Yates guide to herbs" - Jackie French (I find this to be a useful guide in growing the herbs)
"The complete book of herbs and spices" - Claire Loewenfeld and Philippa Back
"The illustrated herbal encyclopedia" - Brenda Little

This is just a few of what I have but I use these the most.