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Foxpaw
October 25th, 2005, 10:19 PM
Hey, all. I've been studying paganism on and off in a very occasional non-chalant kind of a way for around 3 1/2 years and I've always been very interested in Reconstructionism. I'd like to follow a path that connects with my heritage but I have no idea where to start...I'm predominently English (Northeast England at that, so probably Anglo-Saxon) a very small amount Celtic (Welsh, Scottish) and 1/4 Slovakian. I thought of just going with one of the three depending on what most spoke to me and following a recon path of that area from there, but I'd kind of like to combine them somewhat, is that possible?

I'm most interested in the Anglo-Saxon and Slavic sides, though I have a soft-spot for Celtic culture. I'm just looking for some preliminary advice, where do I start? I feel kind of overwhelmed trying to educate myself on this kind of a topic and I feel like whenever I search things about Anglo-Saxon recon I get a lot of stuff about Asatru and get jumbled in a lot more of the Saxon and Norse stuff rather than the stuff about the Angles, which is what I'm looking for.

And with Slavic Recon, there seems to be a minimum number of sites out there. There are some good ones, but it'd be nice to find more resources.

Driffinna
October 26th, 2005, 11:03 AM
The best way to approach a reconstruction religion, is go back to most original source there are. Go and find copies and translations of the original tales and sagas from the cultures you are looking at.

I am not so sure how the combining of cultures would work. It suppose it is possible, but to be closer to reconstruction if that is what you are aiming for , I would not put a celtic diety in the same ritual as a slavic one, or an anglo saxon one. All three of those cultures had a different way of doing rituals and a different way of worshipping. So to me, at least combining them would be creating something that would be very different than reconstructing how things were.

The biggest thing you should do right now though is some research into early sources.

Hangatyr 13
November 3rd, 2005, 04:15 PM
I'm most interested in the Anglo-Saxon and Slavic sides, though I have a soft-spot for Celtic culture. I'm just looking for some preliminary advice, where do I start? I feel kind of overwhelmed trying to educate myself on this kind of a topic and I feel like whenever I search things about Anglo-Saxon recon I get a lot of stuff about Asatru and get jumbled in a lot more of the Saxon and Norse stuff rather than the stuff about the Angles, which is what I'm looking for.Saxon, Norse, Angle... Spiritually, there's really not too much of a difference. The Saxons were continental Germanic, the Norse were from Norway (or just Scandinavia depending on who you ask), and the Angles were originally from Denmark (or Jutland), but most of them settled in Britain and interbred with the Saxons (many of whom also migrated to Britain) to become Anglo-Saxons. After that, England was conquered by the Normans (originally from Denmark or Norway, but influenced by the Franks), then settled in the southeast by the Danes, then in the northwest by Norweigans (who also settled the Orkneys in Scotland). I'm sure if my history's a little rusty, then some Brit will promply correct me, but the point is this: There's not too much of a difference.

The religion practiced by Anglo-Saxons, Continental Germans, and Scandinavians was pretty much the same religion. The only differences were local and linguistic (Wotan, Woden, Odhinn, ect) variations. These things don't make them different religions, just the same religion practiced in different places by people who spoke different languages. A good example of where this occurs in a modern mainstream religion is is Catholism. Most Mexicans and Irishmen are Catholic, but there are linguistic and local variations in the way they practice their religion. Mexicans celebrate Dia de la Muerte (sp?) and call their god "Dios", but Irishmen revere St. Patrick and generally call their god "God" (or some Irish Gaelic word).

The relgion of our ancestors wasn't given a name in it's heyday. If you asked one of our ancestors (before Christianity came along) what his religion was, he'd probably get a confused look on his face. The name many of us (including me) have chosen to desribe our religion is "Asatru", and being an American (or "Vin" to use a more purely Germanic term), I practice it like a Vin.

For a good preliminary source, read the Poetic Edda.
Here are some good sites to go to to learn more:
www.runestone.org
www.asatru.org
www.asatrulore.org

KellyP
November 14th, 2005, 01:12 AM
For anyone interested in Recon studies or on one's cultural ancestry, I suggest starting with Wikipedia (www.wikipedia.com (http://www.wikipedia.com)) and focusing not on religion but simply on history.

As an example, I have recently been studying the Angles, Jutes, Franks, Normans, Saxons, etc. and was quite amazed at how so many different groups came from such a small region of northern Europe. Reading through the brief historical snippets available on the internet, one can gain a feeling for the many mixes that related cultures must have experienced as they share territorial borders. This may help you isolate a specific time period, geographic location, or cultural group in learning more about their religious beliefs and practices.

Seren_
November 15th, 2005, 11:45 AM
I'm most interested in the Anglo-Saxon and Slavic sides, though I have a soft-spot for Celtic culture. I'm just looking for some preliminary advice, where do I start?

The easiest thing to do would be to pick one of them and take it from there, IMHO. Read read read. Since you're interested in the Anglo-Saxons, then this site might be useful for you (it's not my area of expertise, though, so if it contains some howlers I'm sure someone else can point them out):

English Heathenism (http://www.englishheathenism.homestead.com/introduction.html)

One avenue that might be worth exploring is the Brythonic people of Britain, which is the name for the Celtic population that the Anglo-Saxons generally had contact with and took over from. Both Welsh and Cornish is thought to have evolved from Brythonic.

Here's a good website with some historical info about Britain from the end of the Roman occupation:
Celtic Britain (http://www.kessler-web.co.uk/History/FeaturesBritain/BritishMap.htm)

There are also several threads on here about Slavic, Anglo-Saxon and various forms of Celtic Reconstruction that you might find useful.