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View Full Version : Its getting colder out... (puppy help)



lilyavalon
November 16th, 2005, 12:17 PM
is there anything I can do for the dog, who has to go outside for some of the day because my husband and I work for a good chunk of the day. She has a dog house with hay in it. But Helena is only 7 mnts old... and has never experenced snow...

Is there anything else I need to get for her?

Is there a snow melt that is non-toxic for pets? I realize that I need to wipe her paws after walks once it starts to snow...

Do I need to worry about her paws and the change in temp? (you know how your hands get really dry in the winter)

I worry about her beeing warm enough. But I work 45 min away and cant come home to bring her out side, and my husband, although he is intown, is at a work place that dosent really alow "pet breaks".

Shes still VERY hyper and likes to run in the house when she is first let in... Shes still chewing on everything (i expect that) its the jumping on us that drives my husband nuts...and me.

Any advice on any of this will help...

Catiana
November 16th, 2005, 12:22 PM
Is it possible for her to be in the garage while you and your husband are at work. A sweater and little booties might help keep her warm when she is out. Although I don't know if they have booties that will stay dry in snow.

ObsessedFae86
November 16th, 2005, 12:28 PM
how about putting her in a room with a closed door..thats what we did..food and water and lots of training pads lol :)

stella01904
November 16th, 2005, 12:33 PM
MM ~ The best doghouses are elevated a bit. Heat rises. In the summer they like to like on the cool earth underneath, and in the winter they are up, away from the cold ground.
An old blanket makes good bedding, as does hay or straw. Make sure the doorway is a bit to the SIDE of the doghouse so the wind does not blow directly in, and nail a flap of some kind on it. Do not face the opening to the north or east.
You don't state what kind of dog she is. Is she long-haired, and if so, does she have the insulation of a long outer coat and a soft inner one? Does the fur grow on the pads of her feet? In other words, is she bred for northern climes? She may actually enjoy it. Huskies, rough collies, chows and keeshonden are a different story than greyhounds, chihuahuas, and pit bulls.
I've seen little boots sold for dogs to keep the ice off their pads, you can google these things easily enough, search on "dog boots" and "non-toxic snow melt". As for whether she will leave the boots on, well, that may be another story! Asking a vet is a good idea but don't stop there if he doesn't know. Table salt melts snow but it will also kill the grass underneath.
Dogs are always lying around cleaning the pads of their feet, it may be best to not use anything, since she has plenty of time to clean her own feet (this is not a non-stop walk).
Hope you find some of this useful!
BB, Stella

lilyavalon
November 16th, 2005, 01:46 PM
MM You don't state what kind of dog she is. Is she long-haired, and if so, does she have the insulation of a long outer coat and a soft inner one? Does the fur grow on the pads of her feet? In other words, is she bred for northern climes? She may actually enjoy it. Huskies, rough collies, chows and keeshonden are a different story than greyhounds, chihuahuas, and pit bulls.


Sorry 'Lana is a Black Lab/German Shep mix
http://dana.dogster.com/pix/dogs/34/177534/177534_1130709710.jpg

stella01904
November 16th, 2005, 02:08 PM
MM ~ She's gorgeous!
Those are pretty hardy breeds, they can live outside and take the cold to a point (20's and 30's should be okay if she has shelter), but she's not a "snow dog" - if it goes into the single digits where you live, I'd consider another arrangement.
She's going to be a good-sized dog! I'd start seriously training her, put her in long "downs", things like that. When she's learned to be a good citizen bringing her indoors won't be so much of a problem.
BB, Stella

SilverMaiden
November 16th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Yeah, labs can't take the cold like the nordic breeds. :lol: I have to drag my dogs (Alaskan Malamutes) in when it's below zero.

I'd make sure the dog house is protected from the wind.
I'd make sure she has a water source that does not freeze.
I'd also think about crate training her. In weather where the wind chill factor gets bad, she can't be outside.
I'd also get into an obedience training class with her. They'll teach you how to work with your dog. Labs absolutely love to please. They'll help with all the issues you've listed. :D

lilyavalon
November 16th, 2005, 03:49 PM
yeah shes hit the point where she dosent like to listen...

I belive my moms cat is sending Helena obidiance lessons for christmas.

Lana likes to play tug of war... even if its with my sleve... shes torn holes in shirts becuase she jumps up and nips...

We are just at the wits end with that little trick, but money is tight so we try to teach her as much as we can. She has learned sit, by a hand comand, and we have a daily schedule. But shes submissive so when hubby yells or goes to pet, sometimes she pees.

but hubby thinks we trained her too much with treats, and now she wont do anything unless there is a treat involved.

I realize her hyperness can be solved with daily walks, (sometimes its hard to do that everyday, due to our schedule, but i try.)

Isil Darkmoon
November 22nd, 2005, 11:49 AM
is there anything I can do for the dog, who has to go outside for some of the day because my husband and I work for a good chunk of the day. She has a dog house with hay in it. But Helena is only 7 mnts old... and has never experenced snow...

Is there anything else I need to get for her?

Is there a snow melt that is non-toxic for pets? I realize that I need to wipe her paws after walks once it starts to snow...

Do I need to worry about her paws and the change in temp? (you know how your hands get really dry in the winter)

I worry about her beeing warm enough. But I work 45 min away and cant come home to bring her out side, and my husband, although he is intown, is at a work place that dosent really alow "pet breaks".

Shes still VERY hyper and likes to run in the house when she is first let in... Shes still chewing on everything (i expect that) its the jumping on us that drives my husband nuts...and me.

Any advice on any of this will help...

How housebroken is she? She is still fairly young, so I need some more detail.

I'd suggest crate training (http://www.ddfl.org/behavior/cratetraining.htm) or a confined room with piddle pads, myself.

A crated dog is much less likely to potty where it is, then one in the house. Crate training (which is NOT a punishment!) can actually help a lot with housebreaking if she's still working on that. Once she's reliably housebroken in the crate, you can work on housebreaking her for the whole house, room by room, and gradually just let her stay home alone on her own.

While it's not ideal, if you can get her used to going out at certain times (right when she gets up,right before you go, right when you'd come home from work, after dinner, just before bed), and if you can teach her to 'potty' on command, that'll help worlds. Java, my Sheltie, is just fine being left alone for an entire workday without messing, and we've occasionally had to leave him for 12 hours or so, and still come home to clean floors.

I'd find crate training for the eventual goal of having her have free run of the house is much, much better than having her go outside. She's a short-coated, single coated dog that's in no way bred to fare well in the cold.

If that's impossible, get her a heated doghouse mat. (http://www.pet-dog-cat-supply-store.com/shop/index.php?page=shop-flypage-10202-9f36fe602b4d53d3435bda593d920889&ps_session=d8ac38956cd9603e966c5f9c3b3797bf) Things like this are available at most petstores, or can be ordered all over the 'net. Just google "heated dog mat". If she has to stay outside, get one of these, it'll make a huge difference. MUCH better than straw.

If you can't get one of these, at least get something warmer and padded, like polarfleece or a body pillow, that'll absorb some of her heat and keep her warm if she lies still.
Also, is the entrance to the doghouse protected in any way, with a swinging door or plastic strips? It really needs to be, it'll keep the area much warmer, and keep bl owing wind, rain, adn snow off of her.

Also, your husband's work doesn't allow "pet breaks"? But are they really going to tell him he's not allowed to go back to his own house to eat over his lunch hour? She's old enough she should be able to get through a workday only being let out once mid-day.

stella01904
November 22nd, 2005, 12:12 PM
While it's not ideal, if you can get her used to going out at certain times (right when she gets up,right before you go, right when you'd come home from work, after dinner, just before bed), and if you can teach her to 'potty' on command, that'll help worlds.
MM ~ I taught my dogs by talking to them when I took them out and I KNEW they had to go: "Pee, Bandit. Pee, Bandit. Poo, Bandit." When I first started this, I wasn't consciously trying to teach them anything, I was just mumbling wishing they'd get it done. But dogs are smart! They learned, they know what it means.
It also gets them back on track when they are just sniffing around having a fine time but I am freezing and want them to hurry up so I can go back inside!
A lot of people swear by crates but I've never used one, it just doesn't sit right with me somehow. Maybe for 15 minutes or so it would be okay but I don't think an active dog is happy locked in a crate.

BB, Stella

Isil Darkmoon
November 22nd, 2005, 03:50 PM
A lot of people swear by crates but I've never used one, it just doesn't sit right with me somehow. Maybe for 15 minutes or so it would be okay but I don't think an active dog is happy locked in a crate.

BB, Stella

Java actually loves his. He doesn't go in it much during the day, but it's wherehe sleeps at night. As son as I turn the bedroom lights off, he'll go stand right inside the crate with a "aren't you going to close teh door" look, or right outside it, until I say "go to bed" then he runs in it--if I don't close it quickly enough to suit him, he'll come out, spin around ,and do it again, just to make sure I saw :)

MorningDove030202
November 22nd, 2005, 04:10 PM
There is pet safe salt for ice, and there are ointments for paws if they get chapped, I've seen it at petsmart. I think you can also get a heat lamp, like for a reptile, and put it in the dog house when it's very cold. You can also get a heated water dish so the water doesn't freeze.
Dove

halfwaynowhere
November 22nd, 2005, 04:19 PM
there are inflatable dog houses that are supposed to keep the heat pretty well, they are designed to be used in extremely cold weather, and snow... they are a bit expensive, but are pretty nice, and pretty durable... they are made out of the same stuff as the rafts that the army uses... we almost got one for our mastiff, but decided we didn't need it, it doesn't get cold over here...

vulfsung
November 22nd, 2005, 05:19 PM
Java actually loves his. He doesn't go in it much during the day, but it's wherehe sleeps at night. As son as I turn the bedroom lights off, he'll go stand right inside the crate with a "aren't you going to close teh door" look, or right outside it, until I say "go to bed" then he runs in it--if I don't close it quickly enough to suit him, he'll come out, spin around ,and do it again, just to make sure I saw :)

*nods in agreement*
I have a german shepherd and she loves her crate. We got her from the animal shelter when she was 9 weeks old, and started crate training right away.

While it may seem cruel-and I have had people tell me I was a horrible person for locking her in the crate-taking her crate away now, six years later is impossible. We haven't had to lock her in or even close the door since she was two, but it's *her* space in the house, where she can go to sleep and the kid can't bug her, the cats don't go, etc. It's hers, all hers!

During training, we made sure she went out first thing in the morning, and right before we left for work at 6:30am. My dad worked half days, so he came at lunch to let her out to pee and run a bit, then she'd be in the crate until 4:30 or so...and as soon as we came in, the first thing was to open the door and let her out to pee. Then, she'd run and run and run and run.....:lol: Always, right before bed, she went out for the last time of the night....Even with me home now, and being 6 yrs old, she *still* follows this schedule.

Once we were about 90% sure she wouldn't have night time accidents, we stopped closing the crate door, and she still slept there. She still does now, until the heat comes on, then she's on the heat register :lol:

For me, personally, I couldn't imagine leaving her outside while I wasn't here...I don't leave her in the yard if I'm not out with her. Winter is something else entirely, it just gets too cold here!

stella01904
November 22nd, 2005, 08:18 PM
Java actually loves his.... As son as I turn the bedroom lights off, he'll go stand right inside the crate with a "aren't you going to close teh door" look, or right outside it, until I say "go to bed" then he runs in it--if I don't close it quickly enough to suit him, he'll come out, spin around ,and do it again, just to make sure I saw :)MM ~ Well, if the dog says he likes it, that's another story!
They do like "caves". Mine hang out under the bed during much of the day.
BB, Stella

Isil Darkmoon
November 22nd, 2005, 11:39 PM
MM ~ Well, if the dog says he likes it, that's another story!
They do like "caves". Mine hang out under the bed during much of the day.
BB, Stella

Under the bed is sacred territory of the cats. Java tries to go under the bed, he gets royally bopped on the nose.

That's the great thing about proper crate training--it's never used as punishment, it speeds up housebreaking, and it makes them more reliable around the house as a whole, while it also gives them a safe and secure place to go to, somewhere that's really "theirs" and they want to be when they feel stressed or just cranky or want ot be alone.