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Kendrah
December 2nd, 2005, 03:08 PM
What is the best way you found to learn how to draw, other then drawing all the time? I know drawing all the time is the best way, so there's no issue there.

But, did you learn a lot from copying other people's art? Or studying people and things out in the natural enviroment? I've heard the best way to learn how to draw is to copy the masters but I've also heard that a lot of artist take offense if someone copies their art (even if they don't pass it off as their own and it never sees the light of day and some such.)

So, for those who are fairly profitiant in draawing, what do you think?

Kendrah
December 4th, 2005, 01:29 PM
Nothing? No one?

halfwaynowhere
December 4th, 2005, 01:50 PM
i think a lot of it depends on what you want to draw... if you want to draw people, it might be good to invest in a book of photographs of nudes.. then you try to copy those photographs, that way you gt a feel for anatomy, and for shaping people properly, especially if those photographs are of all different shapes and sizes of people... at least, thats what i have done, and although i don't draw all that well, or all that often, it seems to help... once you get a feel for copying pictures, you will be able to draw your own...

Raunijar
December 4th, 2005, 02:19 PM
I think drawing from observation is the best way to learn... Not that you should try to be 'realistic' when drawing from observation...But understanding the corellation between what your eyes see when you look at an object, and the movement of your hand when you try to draw that object is one of the fundamentals, and a key to perspective and visual measurement.

Dawa Lhamo
December 6th, 2005, 01:17 PM
A good book is Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (http://www.drawright.com/). We used it in my HS drawing class, and I found it very helpful. Anyway, it's got some good ideas for overcoming the common difficulties with proportion and realism...

You have to get beyond the conception of the object and learn to just see the shape of it. Otherwise it will be distorted (child-like). Copying from other drawings and photographs is sometimes easier at first than drawing from life, because they're already 2D (though small still-lifes are good... you may consider taking pictures of what you want to draw and then drawing from the pictures).

One thing to try is to take the image you want to draw and turn it upside-down. This confuses the brain so you don't use the recognition part of the brain so much and you can see it "more purely". Then draw the picture with the image upside down.

Another good exercise is to make a grid on your paper and also on the image you're drawing. (You can set up a grid-screen for still-lifes), then concentrate only on one square at a time and the shapes within that square.

Start with small things, simple things, like a crumpled up piece of paper, and experiment with drawing textures. Forget what you *know* about an object, just draw exactly what you see. (i.e. it's not a "nose" it's this kinda long, roundish, knobby bit with some light here, some shadow here... once you're done drawing, you can step back and say, "hey, what do you know, that's a nose!") It's tricky to get the hang of this.

Once you get good at drawing from what you see and not what you know, (don't feel you have to rush into it) then is the time to start building what you know. For people, it might be becoming acquainted with how the muscles move and anatomy, for trees, you might study how they branch, which way the leaves turn, what they look like in the wind... that sort of thing... Don't be afraid to sketch, either... not everything you draw has to become a completed work of art.

Copying is a tried-and-true way of building your skill, but honestly, I find drawing from life a lot more rewarding. Plus, if you do a good job, you can hang it up and it's YOUR work and not just a copy of something well-known. [I've got a bunch of good drawings in a folder of copies of images, but the ones I've hung up are all originals.] But start simple. That's my advice.

Tashi delek!
Dawa Lhamo

KEishin
December 6th, 2005, 03:20 PM
I love that book - it wasn't until I read it that I found that when I turn things upside down I could draw them more accurately, because my astigmatism distorts the lines I draw right-side-up. They look fine to me when I draw them, but when I turn the picture around, they are totally off.

I personally hate copying, which was how my art teachers wanted me to learn. Honestly, it didn't work for me, because I used the *pictures* as a crutch and wasn't able to tranfer that knowledge to RL. Once I stopped listening to them :shhhh: , I got much better.

I used to take my sketchbook and find a place I could hide and draw people. (I hate having people watch me draw in public, like I'm their entertainment!) Shopping malls, university campuses, public parks, etc are all great. When in college, I used to sit on the third floor balcony of the student union and draw all the people passing by. Because they moved so fast, I did line drawings or motion sketches with a thick pencil, which taught me LOADS about how the human figure moves. More so in fact than my figure drawing classes.

I always found that when I sat out in nature I got too distracted by everything going on to truly focus. Instead I would get small objects - leaves, rocks, pinecones, feathers - and arrange them at home and draw them. I used to use the same items over and over, as each time you repeat you get more proficent at drawing them.

SidneyCozzoi
December 7th, 2005, 02:24 PM
What is the best way you found to learn how to draw, other then drawing all the time? I know drawing all the time is the best way, so there's no issue there.

But, did you learn a lot from copying other people's art? Or studying people and things out in the natural enviroment? I've heard the best way to learn how to draw is to copy the masters but I've also heard that a lot of artist take offense if someone copies their art (even if they don't pass it off as their own and it never sees the light of day and some such.)

So, for those who are fairly profitiant in draawing, what do you think?
To be honest, study people and things, take photographs. There are zillions of drawing books, I would recommend for any artist "Anatomy for the Artist" It's a huge detailed book. It helped by leaps and bounds!