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David19
March 13th, 2006, 08:20 PM
This is something i've wondered, do you take the myths as literal events that happened that involved supernatural beings, gods and supernatural/mystical events or do you believe there are natural explanation's for them. It's just i'm curious, as i'm interested in several reconstructionist religions, but i'm not sure how hard polytheist's view the myths, since if the gods are individual, and you believe the myths aren't true, how do you know what the gods are like (e.g. how do you know what Zeus is like, or what the Greek gods are like or Norse gods, etc).

Hope that made sense :)

Thanks.

Brandon Bee
March 13th, 2006, 09:06 PM
No, I don't think all the myths should be taken literally. Personally, I believe some mythology should be taken symbollically or metaphorically, and some mythology should be taken literally (according to whatever you believe).

Morag Elasaid Ni Dhomhnaill
March 14th, 2006, 08:58 PM
I believe that the myths are romanticised versions of remembered events. For example there are many myths involving Niall of the Nine Hostages, but he is also the first verifiable king of Ireland as well as mythical character. The myths about Fionn Mac Cumhail (Finn Mac Cool), Cu Chullain or the Tuatha de Dannan are likely to be based on historical events that have been otherwise forgotten and since embellished. They may have been turned into gods due to the wonder and amazement people have for them, but in fact likely started out as a people just like you and I.

Nantonos
March 18th, 2006, 07:18 AM
This is something i've wondered, do you take the myths as literal events

Mine don't have myths, generally.

But I have not seen much in the way of 'Recon Creationism', mainly because there isn't that same social pressure to compete on piety, which tends to produce that sort of extreme literalism.

solar_pagan
April 14th, 2006, 05:04 AM
As a Phoenician reconstructionist I see the mythology primarily as theological lore. Their primary purpose is to explain the nature of things through stories, Especially the nature of deities and how they interact with the world. They also can explain the inner meaning of certain festivals and ritual practices. It's not that the stories are actually literal but how the people understood their gods and their religious leaders expressed these beliefs through sacred myths and prayers.

Just because they are myths though doesn't mean they're not held in the same esteem as "supposed" literal holy books like the Bible, Vedas, or Quran. They are sacred to us because they represent how the people believed in their gods and their religious rites. See back in the day Religion wasn't based on holy books and faith alone. Religion was a holy rite, a way of achieving good ties with the gods.

Theres
April 14th, 2006, 11:09 AM
since Greek myths are conglomerate stories altered over time, i generally disregard them entirely in favor of cultic histories and contemporary literature.

i only fall back on the myths when no other material is available.

Ceffyl
April 20th, 2006, 01:01 AM
This is something i've wondered, do you take the myths as literal events that happened that involved supernatural beings, gods and supernatural/mystical events or do you believe there are natural explanation's for them.

None of the deities I honor have any known myths. When I've read myths about deities -- Norse, Roman, Greek, etc. -- I've viewed them like stories your grandmother might tell you about a distant relative. More romanitcised than anything, but possibly a grain of truth and insight into the person's character.

Tim
September 1st, 2006, 01:19 AM
I don't take them literally... either.

Eldred Grimm
September 1st, 2006, 08:18 PM
The myths are first stories to entertain second lessons to learn for the culture they are told from

Theres
September 1st, 2006, 08:30 PM
The myths are first stories to entertain second lessons to learn for the culture they are told from
i would say that it's the other way around, but that is the jist of it.