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Agaliha
June 22nd, 2006, 10:24 PM
Any Panentheists here?

Like a month ago I found Pantheism and I sort of jumped on that wagon because well it fit, but I never really looked into Panentheism. So because I still have ideas and beliefs about there being an unknowable, unnamed force that we can't even imagine or comprehend (to which I call myself agnostic about and to the known gods that we know of I am more atheistic...if that makes sense).

So to make sure I'm in the right place and label -- though I don't really care about labels, but if I'm going to call myself something I want to be sure I'm it-- I'm reading more about Panentheism.

Any one want to share their Panentheistic views, beliefs, ideas?
Edit: There doesn't seen to be much online about it :( so all the input I get is helpful!

Morgandria
June 23rd, 2006, 12:42 AM
*waves*

Don't have much to offer you. I believe that the Source is in all things, but is also separate and its' own being. That's about the size of it.

Agaliha
June 23rd, 2006, 02:34 AM
Hey! :)
I remember you mentioning that you had Panetheist beliefs.

I guess what I'm curious about is how Panetheist live-- spiritually. I get the Pantheist thing, but I'm still wondering about this.
I mean there's the belief that their is a Source, but do you (or just Panentheists) pray to the Source? Honor it? How is it represented? Things like that.

I guess it's those details I'm curious about and struggling to find out.

And uh, I really don't know what I believe. ::sigh::
Is this energy part of the univese only or part of it and also seperate?
:wah: Seesh, this stuff is hard.

Grimr
June 23rd, 2006, 04:23 AM
Hey! :)
I remember you mentioning that you had Panetheist beliefs.

I guess what I'm curious about is how Panetheist live-- spiritually. I get the Pantheist thing, but I'm still wondering about this.
I mean there's the belief that their is a Source, but do you (or just Panentheists) pray to the Source? Honor it? How is it represented? Things like that.

I guess it's those details I'm curious about and struggling to find out.

And uh, I really don't know what I believe. ::sigh::
Is this energy part of the univese only or part of it and also seperate?
:wah: Seesh, this stuff is hard.

I consider myself a Pantheist.

Is it different from Panetheists?

Agaliha
June 23rd, 2006, 04:34 AM
I consider myself a Pantheist.
Is it different from Panetheists?

Yup. Totally. That little "en" in the middle makes a big difference.

Wikipedia:
Panentheism (Greek words: πάν ( 'pan' ) =all, en=in and Theos=God; "all-in-God") is the view that God is immanent within all Creation or that God is the animating force behind the universe. Unlike pantheism, panentheism does not mean that the universe is synonymous with God. Instead, it holds that there is more to God than the material universe. In panentheism, God maintains a transcendent character, and is viewed as both the creator and the original source of universal morality.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panentheism

Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( 'pan' ) = all and Theos = God) literally means "God is All" and "All is God". It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. More detailed definitions tend to emphasize the idea that natural law, existence, and the universe (the sum total of all that is, was, and shall be) is represented or personified in the theological principle of 'God'.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantheism

And now I just came across Deism ::sigh:: more reading. Heh. :idea:
Belief in God: Yes
Foundation for Belief:Reason
Basis for Belief:Nature and Experience
Relationship with God:Abstract and Impersonal
Nature of God:Generally Incomprehensible (individualized and based on Reason)
Morality:Humanist/Utilitarian - Generally based on Reason and The Golden Rule
Communication with God:Private Revelation – Rejection of Special Revelation (individualized based on Reason)
Rights of Man:Natural Law
Gods Involvement:Varying Degrees of interaction from mere observance to guidance but must remain within laws of nature
Purpose of Life:To honor God by using our God-given reason to act in such a way as to secure human happiness and contentment
Afterlife:
Skeptical and non-dogmatic about it's existence, but "hope" there is one.
http://www.positivedeism.com/deisminanutshell.html

Hummmm...

Philosophia
June 23rd, 2006, 06:22 AM
Here are some links:
http://www.panentheism.com/
http://www.websyte.com/alan/pan.htm
http://www.pantheist.net/society/panentheism.html
http://mb-soft.com/believe/txc/panenthe.htm
http://atheism.about.com/library/FAQs/religion/blrel_theism_panen.htm
http://www.panentheism.net/
http://www.kheper.net/topics/worldviews/panentheism.html
Here's a yahoo group to look at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Panentheism/

I've never really looked into Panentheism but it's very interesting.

shuvanilu
June 23rd, 2006, 12:15 PM
I consider myself panentheist. I think the most simple way of putting it is that I believe that the Divine pervades everything, and is at the same time transcendent. There is a Divine spark in everything and everyone, but there is still *something* out there higher than us. It complements my belief in a kind of oneness...that we are all connected somehow. I'm not really sure how to answer your question about how a panentheist worships. Panentheism just kind of fits with my religion...in my mind anyway---surely others would disagree.---shuavnilu

omar
June 23rd, 2006, 04:30 PM
I consider myself panentheist. I think the most simple way of putting it is that I believe that the Divine pervades everything, and is at the same time transcendent. There is a Divine spark in everything and everyone, but there is still *something* out there higher than us. It complements my belief in a kind of oneness...that we are all connected somehow. I'm not really sure how to answer your question about how a panentheist worships. Panentheism just kind of fits with my religion...in my mind anyway---surely others would disagree.---shuavnilu
I thought there was a differance in the two words. So now I know i'm Panentheism. Thanks.

Christo Pagan
June 23rd, 2006, 04:42 PM
Here's another good site that I've really enjoyed reading through about, what the author calls, "symbiotic Panentheism":

www.panentheism.com

Very interesting!

Agaliha
June 23rd, 2006, 05:20 PM
Thanks everyone :)

cheddarsox
June 23rd, 2006, 07:13 PM
I called myself a panentheist for awhile. I was used to having a deity, and it was a transitional stage for me. Then I got to the point where I realized I was basically agnostic about the transcendent part. If there is more to the Divine than the universe, that is fine, but there is no way for me to know or interact with that which is, by definition, beyond that which I am capable of interacting with.

If the Divine is "more" that is great...but it doesn't really affect me, I can only deal with the part of the Divine that interacts with the universe...so, instead of spreading myself thin, and trying to understand that which may or may not exist outside of my realm of understanding...I gave up and now only focus on the parts I can interact with.

I'm the sort of person who stays up at night wondering...so this was basically the only way I could get back to a productive life and have some sort of functional practice.

cheddar

Agaliha
June 23rd, 2006, 09:03 PM
That makes a lot of sense, Cheddar. Thanks for posting!
I just find myself...thinking, wishing even that there is something out there, but I've never really experienced it. I'm agnsotic about it as well. I don't know if it's there or not.

I realize I spend way too much time thinking about gods and things that I can never proove, experience and explain. Most of it is that history, anthroplogy, and theology are favorite subjects of mine and I like learning about it all in general and another part is that I keep thinking I'll find that which is unknowable, the proof I need to believe in something greater out there.

I realized today I should just cool it with my spirituality and just focus on what's there and what I know (so more Pantheistic than anything).
I think Pantheism fits me more, but because it's so new to me, I feel lost or more like wondering...which is why I started to look into other things.

Garm
June 23rd, 2006, 10:09 PM
I realize I spend way too much time thinking about gods and things that I can never proove, experience and explain. Most of it is that history, anthroplogy, and theology are favorite subjects of mine and I like learning about it all in general and another part is that I keep thinking I'll find that which is unknowable, the proof I need to believe in something greater out there.

I realized today I should just cool it with my spirituality and just focus on what's there and what I know (so more Pantheistic than anything).
I think Pantheism fits me more, but because it's so new to me, I feel lost or more like wondering...which is why I started to look into other things.

Have you ingested any Kantian Metaphysics yet?

It's heavy stuff, and a hell of a hangover.

But what little I read of it and understood sorted out a lot af these issues out for me.

Agaliha
June 24th, 2006, 01:41 AM
No, I've never heard of it.
Are there any sites about it...?
What's it about?

Grimr
June 24th, 2006, 02:17 AM
Yup. Totally. That little "en" in the middle makes a big difference.

Wikipedia:
Panentheism (Greek words: πάν ( 'pan' ) =all, en=in and Theos=God; "all-in-God") is the view that God is immanent within all Creation or that God is the animating force behind the universe. Unlike pantheism, panentheism does not mean that the universe is synonymous with God. Instead, it holds that there is more to God than the material universe. In panentheism, God maintains a transcendent character, and is viewed as both the creator and the original source of universal morality.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panentheism

Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( 'pan' ) = all and Theos = God) literally means "God is All" and "All is God". It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. More detailed definitions tend to emphasize the idea that natural law, existence, and the universe (the sum total of all that is, was, and shall be) is represented or personified in the theological principle of 'God'.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantheism

And now I just came across Deism ::sigh:: more reading. Heh. :idea:
Belief in God: Yes
Foundation for Belief:Reason
Basis for Belief:Nature and Experience
Relationship with God:Abstract and Impersonal
Nature of God:Generally Incomprehensible (individualized and based on Reason)
Morality:Humanist/Utilitarian - Generally based on Reason and The Golden Rule
Communication with God:Private Revelation – Rejection of Special Revelation (individualized based on Reason)
Rights of Man:Natural Law
Gods Involvement:Varying Degrees of interaction from mere observance to guidance but must remain within laws of nature
Purpose of Life:To honor God by using our God-given reason to act in such a way as to secure human happiness and contentment
Afterlife:
Skeptical and non-dogmatic about it's existence, but "hope" there is one.
http://www.positivedeism.com/deisminanutshell.html

Hummmm...

Fascinating.

I will have to look up these new lines of thought and then meditate on them.

I will come back to tell you what I think.

I thank you for your wise insight.


Here are some links:
http://www.panentheism.com/
http://www.websyte.com/alan/pan.htm
http://www.pantheist.net/society/panentheism.html
http://mb-soft.com/believe/txc/panenthe.htm
http://atheism.about.com/library/FAQs/religion/blrel_theism_panen.htm
http://www.panentheism.net/
http://www.kheper.net/topics/worldviews/panentheism.html
Here's a yahoo group to look at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Panentheism/

I've never really looked into Panentheism but it's very interesting.

Thanks for the links. :)


Have you ingested any Kantian Metaphysics yet?

It's heavy stuff, and a hell of a hangover.

But what little I read of it and understood sorted out a lot af these issues out for me.

Immanuel Kant? :)

cheddarsox
June 24th, 2006, 09:12 PM
That makes a lot of sense, Cheddar. Thanks for posting!
I just find myself...thinking, wishing even that there is something out there, but I've never really experienced it. I'm agnsotic about it as well. I don't know if it's there or not.

I realize I spend way too much time thinking about gods and things that I can never proove, experience and explain. Most of it is that history, anthroplogy, and theology are favorite subjects of mine and I like learning about it all in general and another part is that I keep thinking I'll find that which is unknowable, the proof I need to believe in something greater out there.

I realized today I should just cool it with my spirituality and just focus on what's there and what I know (so more Pantheistic than anything).
I think Pantheism fits me more, but because it's so new to me, I feel lost or more like wondering...which is why I started to look into other things.

Practicing my faith, all labels aside, is what helped me feel fulfilled. I worship WHAT IS, and don't worry if there may be other levels I am not aware of, it is enough of a job to properly appreciate the wonder I am able to experience.

At first, I felt like I was swimming for the first time without my life preserver...but now, wow. It is really just great. Like any new relationship...or any time a relationship moves to a new level, there is a bit of an akward stage. People used to ask me why I bothered to worship, as a pantheist, if I didn't believe there was a being on the other end enjoying the worship.

I worship because it is my natural response to what is. I do it because I cannot help it, it is like a reflex action. And if feels right, and great, and amazing, and true. I don't do it out of obligation or because I want to appease some deity, I do it because I can do no other. Like laughing at a great joke. We don't think..."I'll laugh to make the jokester happy" we laugh because the joke is great. I worship because the universe is great, not convenient, but great.

cheddar

Garm
June 26th, 2006, 03:31 AM
No, I've never heard of it.
Are there any sites about it...?
What's it about?

It's part, in fact an important part, of the wisdom traditions of the DWEM tribe.

[That's Dead White European Males, at least by the definition of some of the more radically PC]

I'm not sure how fairly I can summarize this, be aware of personal skewage.

Kant's work on metaphysics starts with a very critical examination of our means of percieving and understanding the world around us. Investigating our notions of space, time, casaulity and the infinite he leads us to the conclusion that they are part of our sensory apparatus which function to create the enviroment we experience. Without them we can't even have the experience of anything at all, so their forms are apriori set in our mind and they are not things we learn about from an enviroment exsisting externally. They are fine and perfectly suited to accomplishing tasks within the realm of the mundane, but even within the limits of their own fields they have flaws, contradictions which lead us to paradoxes like Xenos arrow or mirror image thing which he describes as

"What can be more similar in every respect and in every part
more alike to my hand and to my ear, than their images in a
mirror? And yet I cannot put such a hand as is seen in the glass
in the place of its archetype; for if this is a right hand, that
in the glass is a left one, and the image or reflection of the
right ear is a left one which never can serve as a substitute for
the other. There are in this case no internal differences which
our understanding could determine by thinking alone. Yet the
differences are internal as the senses teach, for,
notwithstanding their complete equality and similarity, the left
hand cannot be enclosed in the same bounds as the right one (they
are not congruent); the glove of one hand cannot be used for the
other."

Illogical Iconsistencies like these point to a problem in the perceptive toolkit, IOW, it's not the images, it's the camera.

"What is the solution? These objects are not
representations of things as they are in themselves, and as the
pure understanding would know them, but sensuous intuitions, that
is, appearances, the possibility of which rests upon the relation
of certain things unknown in themselves..."

Then he proceeds to demonstrate how these bugs in the software when applied to questions about the nature of God and the universe will be able to give different awsners which can each be "right" in the sense of being consistent with it's own logic but are contradictory of one and other.

Probably the most complete paradigm of agnostism ever formulated, he kills off any and all hope of an intectual solution with total ownage.

The percievable universe he defines as phenomena, the universe of things unknown in themselves as noumena, the latter being the ground the former is based upon.

This concept of an imperfectly narrated reality that will always be, by the nature of our own minds, incomplete and flawed was one the major cornerstones of our current secular culture. No "truth" will ever be adquate to describe the complete nature of the noumena. This has major implications for the idea of any religious orthodoxy or theocracy. The 1600's saw a number of incredibly viscious wars of religion, the enlightenment of the 1700's was very much in reaction to that.

His own solution to the notion of God and morality seemed based upon the arguement through utility idea, there is nothing in the world of experience to provide us with our ideas about them, so like our sense of spatiotemporal causality, they are placed within us apriori, so the basis for our faith is to be found in the immanent kingdom[to paraphase NT terminology].

Now the best intro to his work is something he described as being for teachers of metaphysics who are trying to find a simple enough of way of describing the Kantian system.

http://philosophy.eserver.org/kant-prolegomena.txt

What he regarded as being his real work, the prolegomena was kind of the cheat and crib note version,

http://philosophy.eserver.org/kant/critique-of-pure-reason.txt

both of those links are from this site here

http://www.hkbu.edu.hk/~ppp/K1texts.html#II

Grimr
July 11th, 2006, 10:50 AM
Can someone help me in understanding the basic principles of Panentheism?

I would very much appreciate it. :)

Fatherman
July 11th, 2006, 04:24 PM
I've considered myself panentheist for quite a few years. It's not a religion, it's just a particular perspective. Right now, I'm really interested in ways of expressing it...expressing my unity with the Divine Source. Magic is a really good way of expressing panentheism. Saying "Hey, I'm a partner in creation here! I'm going to play my part!"

Agaliha
July 11th, 2006, 05:39 PM
Can someone help me in understanding the basic principles of Panentheism?
I would very much appreciate it. :)

Did you read those sites linked above?

From what I understand Panentheism beliefs god is the force behind the universe, and is not the universe as Pantheism states.
Panetheism beliefs there is more to god than what we see (Pantheists believe nature and the universe is all there is).
God is transcendent in panentheism, its the creator and source of things.

Panentheism states the universe and nature is part of god, but there is something more...something higher than us and somewhere outside of what we see.
Pantheism states the universe and nature is "god" and sacred, ther is nothing more outside of us...most are agnostic and atheist, it's a what you see is what there is thing.



Neoplatonism is panentheistic. Plotinus taught that there was an ineffable transcendent God 'The One' of which subsequent realities were emanations. From the One emanates the Divine Mind (Nous), the Cosmic Soul (Psyche), and the World (Cosmos).




Panentheism
A model of the relation between God and the universe which regards the whole created order as contained within God, and yet considers that this does not exhaust the divine being.

To compare:

Pantheism
Pantheism holds that God is in the world or, rather, God is the world. It stresses the immanence of God in the world. There are several kinds of pantheism. The Greek philosopher Parmenides is famous for explicating what is known as absolute pantheism. This asserted that there was only one being in the universe and everything else was non-being. Another ancient source, Plotinus, was believed to be an exponent of emanational pantheism, in that everything flows from God the way a flower unfolds from a seed. The most obvious example of this kind of thought in the contemporary climate is Hinduism, a manifestational pantheism; that all things are, in some sense, divine and to be venerated as such.

Does that answer it?
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoplatonism)

Grimr
July 12th, 2006, 02:00 AM
Did you read those sites linked above?

From what I understand Panentheism beliefs god is the force behind the universe, and is not the universe as Pantheism states.
Panetheism beliefs there is more to god than what we see (Pantheists believe nature and the universe is all there is).
God is transcendent in panentheism, its the creator and source of things.

Panentheism states the universe and nature is part of god, but there is something more...something higher than us and somewhere outside of what we see.
Pantheism states the universe and nature is "god" and sacred, ther is nothing more outside of us...most are agnostic and atheist, it's a what you see is what there is thing.




To compare:


Does that answer it?


That does help me out.

Consider myself a Panentheist then! lol


What does Panentheism think of the many religions and faiths of this world?

Agaliha
July 12th, 2006, 02:12 AM
What does Panentheism think of the many religions and faiths of this world?

I'm not sure actually.
Panentheism isn't a religion in itself, but a belief/view. It's found in many faiths-- Hinduism, Christianity, etc

I used to wonder what it would be called when someone believes all the worlds paths and gods were equally valid, but I never came across any definition that fit.
Is that what you were asking about?

Grimr
July 12th, 2006, 02:33 AM
I'm not sure actually.
Panentheism isn't a religion in itself, but a belief/view. It's found in many faiths-- Hinduism, Christianity, etc

I used to wonder what it would be called when someone believes all the worlds paths and gods were equally valid, but I never came across any definition that fit.
Is that what you were asking about?

Yes.


I see all religions and beliefs as expressions of the divine put in place in the many different peoples of this world.

I believe that since the divine created many different peoples of this world that in that the divine chooses to show itself in many guises with a common underlying theme of wisdom.

Agaliha
July 12th, 2006, 02:53 AM
Yes.
I see all religions and beliefs as expressions of the divine put in place in the many different peoples of this world.
I believe that since the divine created many different peoples of this world that in that the divine chooses to show itself in many guises with a common underlying theme of wisdom.

I used to believe that too. Well I still do, only I don't have the theistic angle of it anymore. I see them all as being equally valid because they all were created/inspired by people, our world and our experiences. They came from us and we are all human. I don't see one faith being better or more true than another. I don't see one god being the only one or more true, even though I personally don't believe in the gods.

Baha'i has that belief as well, what you are describing...but they leave out Pagan faiths. Heh. They're monotheists as well.
Bahá'í Faith (http://www.religionfacts.com/bahai/index.htm)
Bahai.org (http://www.bahai.org/)
Like Jews, Christians and Muslims, Bahá'ís believe in only one God, who sends prophets as his messengers. But Bahá'ís regard God as completely transcendent and ultimately unknowable, so Bahá'í doctrine focuses primarily on "Manifestations of God" who progressively reveal God to humanity. These include Abraham, Moses, Zoroaster, Krishna, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, the Bab, and Bahá'u'lláh.

They're more tolerant of other faiths though.

Grimr
July 12th, 2006, 03:03 AM
I used to believe that too. Well I still do, only I don't have the theistic angle of it anymore. I see them all as being equally valid because they all were created/inspired by people, our world and our experiences. They came from us and we are all human. I don't see one faith being better or more true than another. I don't see one god being the only one or more true, even though I personally don't believe in the gods.

Baha'i has that belief as well, what you are describing...but they leave out Pagan faiths. Heh. They're monotheists as well.
Bahá'í Faith (http://www.religionfacts.com/bahai/index.htm)
Bahai.org (http://www.bahai.org/)
Like Jews, Christians and Muslims, Bahá'ís believe in only one God, who sends prophets as his messengers. But Bahá'ís regard God as completely transcendent and ultimately unknowable, so Bahá'í doctrine focuses primarily on "Manifestations of God" who progressively reveal God to humanity. These include Abraham, Moses, Zoroaster, Krishna, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, the Bab, and Bahá'u'lláh.

They're more tolerant of other faiths though.

I have heard of Bahai , but I never could understand their ecleticism on a personal level.

Since a earlier age I have believed all beliefs to be divine manifestations of the great spirit in all things.

I am definately no monotheist though. lol.

I am heavily polytheistic and yet I do believe that everything comes from a single source in which that source I see as the all powerful Goddess Eurynome.

I am very different I know. ;)

Agaliha
July 12th, 2006, 03:12 AM
I am heavily polytheistic and yet I do believe that everything comes from a single source in which that source I see as the all powerful Goddess Eurynome.

Henotheism perhaps? Or monolatry?
Thread: Views of the Divine (http://www.mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=64607&highlight=views+divine)

Henotheism—belief in, and possible worship of, multiple gods, one of which is supreme. It is also called inclusive monotheism or monarchial polytheism.
henotheism – I worship one God, but there may be more.

polytheism + monism – There are multiple Gods, but they are all aspects of one divine Force; OR, there are multiple Gods, and there is also a divine Force.
(also known as “monolatry”)

Monolatry—the practice of worshiping only one god without, however, denying the existence of other gods.

Grimr
July 12th, 2006, 03:17 AM
Henotheism perhaps? Or monolatry?
Thread: Views of the Divine (http://www.mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=64607&highlight=views+divine)

Henotheism—belief in, and possible worship of, multiple gods, one of which is supreme. It is also called inclusive monotheism or monarchial polytheism.
henotheism – I worship one God, but there may be more.

polytheism + monism – There are multiple Gods, but they are all aspects of one divine Force; OR, there are multiple Gods, and there is also a divine Force.
(also known as “monolatry”)

Monolatry—the practice of worshiping only one god without, however, denying the existence of other gods.

I would probally call myself Henotheistic.

That sounds more closer to my belief.

I don't deny the existence of other Gods though.

I worship many Gods besides Eurynome.

Agaliha
July 12th, 2006, 03:21 AM
Perhaps monolatry along with something else, a combo of sorts.

Or this:
henopolytheism - Devotion in one pantheon or set of gods/goddesses, without denying the existence of other gods/goddesses outside of that set.

Grimr
July 12th, 2006, 03:24 AM
Perhaps monolatry along with something else, a combo of sorts.

Or this:
henopolytheism - Devotion in one pantheon or set of gods/goddesses, without denying the existence of other gods/goddesses outside of that set.


I looked up both Henotheism and Monaltry.

I have decided that my belief is more leaning to Henotheism.

On Panentheism I am not sure what to think.

Is Henotheism compatible with Panentheism?

Agaliha
July 12th, 2006, 03:30 AM
Is Henotheism compatible with Panentheism?

I would think so.
Panentheism just says nature and the universe are part of "god" (or energy, higher spirit) as well as being outside of it.
So you believing they are higher and transcendent would work with henotheism.

Grimr
July 12th, 2006, 03:37 AM
I would think so.
Panentheism just says nature and the universe are part of "god" (or energy, higher spirit) as well as being outside of it.
So you believing they are higher and transcendent would work with henotheism.

To me the Universe and all of reality with existence is ruled by Eurynome.

I also believe that all Gods have descended from her since the beginning of time.


Other Gods I worship would be Ares,Dionysus,Pan,Eros, and Hades.

I also worship Herakles , but not as a God.

I worship Herakles as a divine spirit that one can benefit from in prayer.

Herakles to me would be a divine guide or gaurdian.


I also worship the many forms of Eurynome.

Artemis,Aphrodite,Athena,Astarte,Gaia,Hecate and Demeter.

fafonen
July 15th, 2006, 08:40 AM
I don't believe pantheism and panentheism are considered religions, which is why there isn't any description as to how they worship, their ideals, etc. Pantheism and panentheism are belief systems. Their words to describe how someone views the divine, not a religion.

For instance, monotheism is a belief system, not a religion, but religions like Islam and Christianity fall under monotheism, even though they aren't the same religion. Just like most pagan religions fall under the belief system of polytheism.

Edit: I just saw someone else posted something similar earlier. Sorry for the redundancy.

Birdy
August 21st, 2006, 02:10 AM
People used to ask me why I bothered to worship, as a pantheist, if I didn't believe there was a being on the other end enjoying the worship.

I worship because it is my natural response to what is. I do it because I cannot help it, it is like a reflex action. And if feels right, and great, and amazing, and true. I don't do it out of obligation or because I want to appease some deity, I do it because I can do no other. Like laughing at a great joke. We don't think..."I'll laugh to make the jokester happy" we laugh because the joke is great. I worship because the universe is great, not convenient, but great.

cheddar

I just wanted to say that I love this. This is how I feel as a pantheist, I was never able to put it into words like this, so thanks.

Also, I wanted to note that for pantheists, the universe is the something more/something larger (since we are a tiny part of it)

cheddarsox
August 21st, 2006, 10:01 PM
I don't believe pantheism and panentheism are considered religions, which is why there isn't any description as to how they worship, their ideals, etc. Pantheism and panentheism are belief systems. Their words to describe how someone views the divine, not a religion.

For instance, monotheism is a belief system, not a religion, but religions like Islam and Christianity fall under monotheism, even though they aren't the same religion. Just like most pagan religions fall under the belief system of polytheism.

Edit: I just saw someone else posted something similar earlier. Sorry for the redundancy.

There are people who are interested in having a pantheistic religion. So while pantheism, as a whole, is not organized into a religion, there are movements forming for pantheists who practice their faith as a religion.

I happen to be one of those people.

I practice a version called Ardent Pantheism.

I love my faith!

cheddar

cheddarsox
August 21st, 2006, 10:03 PM
I just wanted to say that I love this. This is how I feel as a pantheist, I was never able to put it into words like this, so thanks.

Also, I wanted to note that for pantheists, the universe is the something more/something larger (since we are a tiny part of it)

It's always wonderful to find another kindred spirit.

I have a yahoo group...ardentpantheism...I post stuff, sometimes people respond. I'd like more people to respond. If you are interested, feel welcome to drop by.

cheddar