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David19
July 1st, 2006, 10:15 AM
I just wanted to know something, and i know there's a Druid forum too, but i wasn't sure where to put this (so i hope it's ok in here:)). But is there a difference between Celtic and/or Irish reconstructionism and Druidry, i'm not a Celtic/Irish recon or a Druid, but it's something i've wondered about, i know the Druids were, originally, governors, judges, lawyers(?), mages/sorcerers, etc, so were Druids more like the 'high priests' and would Celtic recons be reconstructing the practices of the 'ordinary' people or something.

Or would Druid beliefs be completly different to Celtic and Irish recons? (i think i've read that modern Druid beliefs will be different, depending on the area that they are focusing on e.g. a Druid that is focusing in Ireland will be different to one focusing on France, etc (i think, anyway).

Anyway, does anyone know or have any opinions?.

Maggie
July 1st, 2006, 12:04 PM
I just wanted to know something, and i know there's a Druid forum too, but i wasn't sure where to put this (so i hope it's ok in here:)). But is there a difference between Celtic and/or Irish reconstructionism and Druidry, i'm not a Celtic/Irish recon or a Druid, but it's something i've wondered about, i know the Druids were, originally, governors, judges, lawyers(?), mages/sorcerers, etc, so were Druids more like the 'high priests' and would Celtic recons be reconstructing the practices of the 'ordinary' people or something.

Several things here.

Druid is a flexible term in modern usage. There is no one definition; it can range from strict reconstructionism usage to a term applied to a philosophical system that has tenuous or no connection to any celtic society.

Celtic is an unbrella term that includes Ireland, therefore any recon usually states what particular culture he or she is working with. Ireland usually comes up in these discussions, IMO in large part simply because the past of that particular culture is the most well known. It's not even certain that other celtic cultures even had druids, although it seems to be assumed that they did.

There do seem to be differences among the different cultures; for example there doesn't seem to be any evidence of summer solstice celebrations in the Scottish Highlands. There are also differences in the dieties, some seem to be confined to the continent and vice versa.

Maggie

Seren_
July 1st, 2006, 03:49 PM
Those druids who are reconstructionist in focus would come under the umbrella term of Celtic Recons, but not all Celtic Recons identify themselves as druids and not all druids are recons.

Generally druids are perceived as those who serve a community (and are learned, priestly etc), and seeing as I'm more interested in focusing on the practises in the home - and don't have a community to serve anyway - I guess it's like you say. Some Celtic Recons prefer to focus on the practises of the 'ordinary' people - in my case, the home - or various other aspects of society.

There is a FAQ that's just been published here:

http://www.paganachd.com/faq/

There are various points currently being argued about by some recons, seeing as it's just been published, but it should give you the general gist of things.

skilly-nilly
July 2nd, 2006, 10:59 AM
I just wanted to know something, and i know there's a Druid forum too, but i wasn't sure where to put this (so i hope it's ok in here:)). But is there a difference between Celtic and/or Irish reconstructionism and Druidry, i'm not a Celtic/Irish recon or a Druid, but it's something i've wondered about, i know the Druids were, originally, governors, judges, lawyers(?), mages/sorcerers, etc, so were Druids more like the 'high priests' and would Celtic recons be reconstructing the practises of the 'ordinary' people or something.

Or would Druid beliefs be completely different to Celtic and Irish recons? (i think i've read that modern Druid beliefs will be different, depending on the area that they are focusing on e.g. a Druid that is focusing in Ireland will be different to one focusing on France, etc (i think, anyway).

Anyway, does anyone know or have any opinions?.

I have opinions, although they are much like the ones already expressed.
'Druid', in the old way, is indeed a title and not really a description of a group of people with a common religion. Druids has an extensive and exacting education and had to demonstrate their understanding and skills in tests before they achieved their titles (there were several, not just 'Druid'). So 'the Druid' was a societal title, not a definition of belief---it wouldn't mean 'follower of Druidry' but something more like 'Priest' and 'Professor' and 'Lawyer'.

Many modern followers of Druidry mis-identify (imo) themselves as 'Druids'. This, to my mind, would be like someone saying, "I am a Catholic, so I am a priest."

The FAQ link is brilliant; that group of re-cons , although hard as stone, are profoundly well-informed and very, very good at expressing themselves.

Reconstructionists often have little to do with Druids, Druidism, or Druidry. They are interested in archaeologically researching what was which, while it can lead to religious behaviour, isn't religious in and of itself---it's a knowledge search. Much of daily living, then and now, isn't referential to the High Gods. The socital values were generated by the society itself---hospitality and honour, for example. People were expected to share and be honourable not because a God/s/dess/desses would punish them if they were not but because the society and the land itself would discredit them if they did wrong action.

Look at the stories about war, famine, and plague coming to lands who'se kings were dishonourable--the stories cite the bad effects as deriving from the bad actions without the addendum of 'the gods brought badness because'.

Sooooooooooo, reconstructionism has mainly to do with research and accuracy, with religious belief as a private concern.

Stoirmeacha
February 23rd, 2008, 12:03 PM
Mainstream Druidism (if it can be called that) is based on mostly the Revivalists from the past couple hundred years, and is not a reconstruction. Druids within CR are those who have kinda been bestowed that title by the community, or those who seek to follow the Druid path as closely as possible. Revivalist Druids were also strongly influenced by Christianity at the beginning too, and I have met some that emphasize the ONE in deity, while Recons are usually, probably always, strictly polytheistic. So Druidism and Celtic Reconstructionist Druidism are basically two different faiths, or rather practices, under the same name.