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Felidae
July 31st, 2006, 01:32 PM
Pumpkin is a Japanese Chin (like my five year old Dru). My daughter asked for a Japanese Chin that was more hers than mine and chose Pumpkin (via the internet) for her pretty Red and White markings and adorable face.

We had to drive to Hartsfield in Atlanta on June 25th to pick her up , so it was not until the next day that we noticed that after a romp with Dru her little front legs would shake, like my knee wobbles when it's wanting to slip out of joint. The vet said it may have been because her breeder (a different one that Dru's) might have confined her too much, so her muscles need to develop a little. A prescription of mega vitamins and a Sulpha drug to erradicate her Coccidia has cleared things up and gotten her on the right road, though at present only weighs 3 1/2 pounds.

But here's the problem: judging from the way she behaves she believes herself to be a 60 plus pound Saint Bernard.

I am doing light Crate training (when we are absent or asleep, otherwise we let her run and stretch) because she simply refuses commands that will greatly inconvenience her. Just stops for a minute, looks at you, then goes right back to whatever she is destroying. When I bathe, I usually have to take the crate into the bathroom with me, because letting her out is a reward for her whining, yipping, and barking to get out when I go to bathe.

I use a squirt bottle, which stops Dru from the aggressive play that Pumpkin instigates, but Pumpkin hardly notices. I use a few (3 or 4) rolled up pieces of newspaper, but yesterday Pumpkin snatched them from my hand and raced across the room, shaking them...

She simply ignores my loud, firm "No!" when my old cat Hex is around. Hex is old, Hex is a little mean, and so far Hex has avoided going across Pumpkin's face like Zorro, but that won't last long. Yesterday Hex was yakking a hair-ball and Pumpkin head-butted her in the bottom before I could catch her.

The only one who seems to have any disciplinary effect on her at all is the older Chin, Dru, and though Dru has taken a slightly surragate motherly role on, well, when she gets bored or fed up she just walks off and leaves us to it.

Most of the time she settles down by 7:00 pm or so, but there are days when, just like a little toddler, her wildness and aggression are amplified so that she can keep herself awake. Then I eventually have to put her in the crate for the night, and I'm serious, she makes growly, yarking, snarkly noises that sound a lot like the kid in the Exorcist until she finally passes out.

I know that she will grow out of most of this eventually, and I know that she is really, deep down inside, a super good puppy. She's just a little more energetic than I'm used to. But in the meantime, anybody got any tips or thoughts that might help us guide her into the dog she's meant to be?

Shanti
July 31st, 2006, 01:57 PM
Basic training. Everyday. Dogs dont get tired of repeating.
Get a good book like ASAPC Complete Dog Training Manual.
It makes the world of difference to work your dog regularly.
The dogs is happy because it has something to do and wants to please its human. It also learns to behave. All are happier.
Refreshing weekly keeps your dogs busy, and in right patterns of behavior.

The book I recommend also has a section for just about every prob you can come across with training exercises to unteach the bad or unwanted behavior.

Felidae
July 31st, 2006, 02:02 PM
Basic training. Everyday. Dogs dont get tired of repeating.
Get a good book like ASAPC Complete Dog Training Manual.
It makes the world of difference to work your dog regularly.
The dogs is happy because it has something to do and wants to please its human. It also learns to behave. All are happier.
Refreshing weekly keeps your dogs busy, and in right patterns of behavior.

The book I recommend also has a section for just about every prob you can come across with training exercises to unteach the bad or unwanted behavior.

Thanks Shanti!

We got a little book from them with her papers when we registered her, but this sounds bigger and I'm betting I can get it on their website!

:)

Shanti
July 31st, 2006, 02:37 PM
Heres a link showing the book, title and author. Its an awesome book.
I dont know if its in print anymore.
LINK (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1564584879/sr=1-2/qid=1154370937/ref=sr_1_2/104-5860514-7700714?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Shanti
July 31st, 2006, 02:42 PM
Hey here is another ASPCA Dog Training Book by the same author.
LINK (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0789447975/sr=1-9/qid=1154371180/ref=sr_1_9/104-5860514-7700714?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Felidae
July 31st, 2006, 02:49 PM
Heres a link showing the book, title and author. Its an awesome book.
I dont know if its in print anymore.
LINK (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1564584879/sr=1-2/qid=1154370937/ref=sr_1_2/104-5860514-7700714?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Well, I'll take a shot at getting a used one. But from my experience, it takes Amazon so long to get these special orders to you Pumpkin may be grown up by the time it comes in! :lol:

We noticed that she was a little inbred when we got her papers in (Grand-Dam was also her Great Grand-Dam, Grand Sire was also her Father)... nothing like Dru's breeding (OK, I know it sounds like I'm playing favorites, like my boss says no dog will "Hold the Bone" that Dru does but it's true!), and as I've stated before I got the dogs from different breeders: Dru's in Tennessee, Pumpkin's in Missouri, so the bloodlines are very different. Could the inbreeding be contributing to her difficulties with behavior? Should I ease up and lower my expectations with her?

Felidae
July 31st, 2006, 03:09 PM
Hey here is another ASPCA Dog Training Book by the same author.
LINK (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0789447975/sr=1-9/qid=1154371180/ref=sr_1_9/104-5860514-7700714?ie=UTF8&s=books)

Oh cool! Now we're in business!

Shanti
July 31st, 2006, 03:16 PM
No book is 100% perfect, IMO. But the ASAP books seem to be the better than most. Except for one.

I also don't use that book alone. Another, it awesome for understand and correcting some of the strange unwanted behaviors in our 4 legged friends. This book for problem behaviors. My copy is from 1994. I love this book and its perfect for that barking dog, chewing dog, bad manners dog, dog that doesn't play nice dog and the list goes on and on. Its 239 pages. Paperback.

Understanding The Dog You Love, A guide to Preventing and solving Behavior problems in your dog.
By, Mordecai Sigal

Here is the contents:
Chapter one..Will the real dog please sit up. (this section talks about dog emotions, Neurosis, Expectations, spoiling and what may result, All sorts of mental issues one may come across, understanding helps to fix it. etc)
Chapter 2...The canine response. ( this talks about Pack behavior, social attachments, alpha/beta, territory, hunting behaviors, practical view of a dogs first year broken down by months, etc)
Chapter three...The dog your puppy will become.(excellent chapter talks about the shy puppy,aggressive pup,nervous pup,stubborn pup, sedate pup, all different dominating personalities. Excellent because different personalities need different interaction, etc)
Chapter 4... A dog in the family ( all about dog/human interactions as stuff)
Chapter 5 Getting your dog under control (Why train, approval, disapproval , basic obedience, objectives, etc)
Chapter 6 house training.
Chapter 7 misbehavior. (puppies probs: crying, chewing, nipping/biting, barking, etc, Adult dogs: the crate what it can be for your dog, barking, begging, biting, boredom, destructive chewing, eating probs, jumping on people/furniture, mounting, stealing food, etc)
Chapter 8.. The AKC canine good citizens test.


Finding even a used copy is worth it. I never understood dog behavior as much till I read this book. It has perspectives I would never of thought of and it all seemed very logical.

It took awhile for me to dig out this book cause I haven't used any of my dog books in a while, but if you an find a copy..its great for understanding why in addition to fixing probs and in teaching your dog.

Felidae
July 31st, 2006, 03:24 PM
Your right, the two books together sound like what I need, because I truly cannot seem to get on Pumpkin's wavelength at all!

Thanks so much again, Shanti! :fpraise:

Tonight I'm going to Amazon to go shopping!

Shanti
July 31st, 2006, 03:49 PM
Your right, the two books together sound like what I need, because I truly cannot seem to get on Pumpkin's wavelength at all!

Thanks so much again, Shanti! :fpraise:

Tonight I'm going to Amazon to go shopping!
Your welcome. Its my magic combo!!
Funny too. I needed to pull my books out anyhow.
We have a new member to our family.
His name is Oshi.
He is around one year old, abandoned rescue.
He is a beagle/basset, which is called...LOL a Bagal!!!!
He is sweet and wonderful and gets along great with our pit and terriers, but...
He was never taught basic commands. He is very calm, like a basset, but he also doesn't react to anything. He doesn't say when he needs to go potty. He hasn't gone in the house, he just holds it for so long, his piss turns dark yellow and he goes and goes and goes.
He doesn't know how to walk on leash. He just stands there, and stands there.
He is afraid of soft ground. (Suspected he was kept kenneled on concrete.)
He doesn't do anything bad, but he doesn't know how to do anything a all!
He doesn't even know how to play, with people or the other dogs.
He is afraid of open spaces so he only walks on the side of a room and wont go across the open middle.

Being a hound he loves my rabbits, but he doesn't try to hurt. He only instinctively knows to chase. We need to work on teaching him to control the instinctive urges to chase so he never bolts from us and gets hurt or lost.

He already rescued one of my rabbits!!
Taking my bunnies outside for their daily lounge in the outdoor pens, one jumped out of my arms and took off. I got Oshi, he tracked and flushed the bunny, got it cornered and just stood guard barking in that beautiful hound howl, and we retrieved the bunny, unharmed.
Oshi prefers the bunnies penned where he can keep an eye and nose on them. LOL

We have had him a few weeks. We have decided to adopt. He is wonderful. He just needs to learn how to be a dog and to not be afraid.

Oh and he is already neutered!! :)

So I will be using my book combo to help Oshi with his own doggie probs. :)

nik
August 1st, 2006, 11:31 PM
Inbreeding can contribute to some behavior problems, but it sounds more like normal untrained puppy stuff. Let the older dog and the cat discipline her, by the way, that's how they learn to respect each other (assuming no real injuries occur, of course). The fastest way to teach her not to pester the cat is to let her get a swipe across the face. It won't happen more than once. She'll get the message!

Lowering your expectations will only allow the unacceptable behavior to continue. Get the dog into a puppy training class as soon as possible. (Call your local pet store, animal shelter, and veterinarian to find a class) And DO crate train, as appropriate to the age of the pup. You have to be consistent though, if you crate her at night then crate her EVERY night. Puppies need routine and consistency. Regular scheduled exercise is also key to controlling excessive puppy behavior. Play ball or go for a long walk or something every evening if she is not seeming tired at the end of the day.

Every dog has its own personality, so don't read much into the bloodlines unless inherited physical problems are at issue. Get whatever training books you can from your local store or library, don't wait for a special order.

Why are you taking the crate to the bathroom? Leave it wherever it belongs. Moving the crate is giving her attention also. Why are you stopping Dru and Pumpkin from playing aggressively? Puppies need to learn limits. If she gets too rough, let Dru let her know. As for ignoring any commands that inconvenience her, its more likely that she doesn't have a clue what your're trying to tell her, in which case she needs obedience training. It's either that or she doesn't respect you, which can only be cured by, guess what, obedience training.

Felidae
August 2nd, 2006, 09:31 AM
Inbreeding can contribute to some behavior problems, but it sounds more like normal untrained puppy stuff. Let the older dog and the cat discipline her, by the way, that's how they learn to respect each other (assuming no real injuries occur, of course). The fastest way to teach her not to pester the cat is to let her get a swipe across the face. It won't happen more than once. She'll get the message!

Lowering your expectations will only allow the unacceptable behavior to continue. Get the dog into a puppy training class as soon as possible. (Call your local pet store, animal shelter, and veterinarian to find a class) And DO crate train, as appropriate to the age of the pup. You have to be consistent though, if you crate her at night then crate her EVERY night. Puppies need routine and consistency. Regular scheduled exercise is also key to controlling excessive puppy behavior. Play ball or go for a long walk or something every evening if she is not seeming tired at the end of the day.

Every dog has its own personality, so don't read much into the bloodlines unless inherited physical problems are at issue. Get whatever training books you can from your local store or library, don't wait for a special order.

Why are you taking the crate to the bathroom? Leave it wherever it belongs. Moving the crate is giving her attention also. Why are you stopping Dru and Pumpkin from playing aggressively? Puppies need to learn limits. If she gets too rough, let Dru let her know. As for ignoring any commands that inconvenience her, its more likely that she doesn't have a clue what your're trying to tell her, in which case she needs obedience training. It's either that or she doesn't respect you, which can only be cured by, guess what, obedience training.

Good, sensible advice! Thank you :)

I got a couple of training books, though they weren't the ones Shanti recommended, one is by the same author. We're working on some basic commands and she catches on pretty well, if Dru isn't hovering about distracting her. One thing I didn't mention is that Pumpkin caught on to pad training within a week and a half, and Dru still hasn't! 8O

My daughter and I thought back, and we remember that when we got Dru she was already 3 months old, and we were only able to purchase her because her herniated naval disqualified her for the show ring. Thanks to her breeder she had a lot of basic training under her belt long before she moved in with us.

I put myself in this little, 8 week old dogs place, and I believe that if Pumpkin did not have as the strong will and personality that she does she would just feel lost or completely unable to find her place in a household with three older, established animals. Looking at it that way, it does work to everyone's advantage, really.

Yep, she's just a strong willed, energetic puppy. Not Satan incarnate. And I will try not to step in the animal dynamics so often (though you'd think they could try a nice, quiet game of backgammon every now and then :lol: )

And I'll keep the crate out of the bathroom! Damn things too big to fit well, anyway.

Felidae
October 12th, 2006, 12:34 PM
Here are a few pics of Pumpkin, the Delinquent in question, that we took last night.

She's still strong willed, but I have discovered that her raison d'etre is not to assert her dominance, it's to be involved in all (and I mean all) household activities.

So costuming not a problem!