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Dustypuppy
October 2nd, 2006, 08:51 AM
what is their connection?

Paracelsus
October 3rd, 2006, 01:24 AM
There isn't one.

Cerulean_damselfly
October 3rd, 2006, 01:39 AM
http://www.druidorder.demon.co.uk/druid_history.htm

The site noted above makes a broad comparison, but not an actual connection as far as I am reading--I am curious if this is why the original question was asked?

Here's an excerpt:

The origins of Druidry are lost in remote antiquity, but its history, so far as we can trace it, has been one of continuous evolution; a process which continues to the present day. Unlike Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam, Druidry had no human founder, nor does it have a fixed canon of scriptures. Perhaps its nearest equivalent is found in Hinduism, where the Brahamana caste have much the same socio-religious role as the Druids in pagan European society. Like the Brahmins, the Druids of old were teachers, priests and priestesses, doctors, historians, prophets, guardians of lore and givers of law. Brahmin and Druid were both noted for their devotion to the concept of a transcendent and all-encompassing Truth. The word Druid may indeed derive from an Indo-European root 'dreo-vid,' meaning 'one who knows the truth.' In practice it was probably understood to mean something like 'wise one,' or 'philosopher-priest.' Some Druids did (and still do) perform priestly functions; officiating in public and private worship, initiating and instructing, healing and blessing.

As far as we know, the religion practised among the Celtic peoples of pre-Roman Europe had no name, just as adherents of what we call Hinduism refer to their faith simply as 'the eternal religion.' Again like Hinduism, Celtic religion seems to have consisted of innumerable localised cults based around local or tribal deities. It seems likely that the rites of these local cults were overseen by members of the Druid caste, just as those of Hinduism are overseen by Brahmins. Their function was to ensure that rites were performed correctly, and their presence in itself lent spiritual authority to the proceedings, for they were professional 'walkers between the worlds;' mediators between Gods and people.
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If so...the above might be a very broad comparison--but I am also stumped and curious. Perhaps my understanding of both topics is so vague, I'm missing any real connectivity--and I'm eager to hear more.

Regards,

Cerulean_Damselfly

Seren_
October 3rd, 2006, 03:48 AM
The idea comes from a time when Indo-European studies were very fashionable, and the elements of similarity found in the Vedas, for example, with elements of Celtic mythology (mostly Irish) made scholars very excited.

Studies have tended to go the other way now, emphasising the differences between each Celtic culture and the other cultures they came into contact with, or may share a common origin with. While there are going to be linguistic similarities because of the common Indo-European origin, and similarities in motifs etc, it could be argued that focusing on the similarities as the antiquarians and scholars did often tends to blind them to the very distinct differences between the cultures that also exist.

That said, there are modern druid orders who find the Brahmins a rich source of information with which to enrich their own practises, as do others. Alwyn and Brinley Rees' book, Celtic Heritage, uses comparisons between the two cultures a lot if you're looking for more information on the matter. It's not something I've ever explored really, so that's about all I can say.

Faol-chu
October 3rd, 2006, 08:01 AM
If you start looking at the indo-european comparative information, the similarities of all indo-european cultures begin to smack you in the face.
J.P. Mallory is a good author to check out on the topic, as well as Bruce Lincoln's Death, War, and Sacrifice.

Among the indo-european cultures, the Celtic cultures and the Brahmin (Vedic) culture were strikingly similar. Presumably, a lot of this is due, in part, to the lack of Mediterannean influences. The very role played by the priests, and the societal structure of those cultures was similar in a way that was not shared by any other known (documented) culture of the time.

Yes, Celtic cultures were unique in their own right...The different ones were even unique from each other if you go the distance to examine them...but that does not negate the documented similarities.

The Rees brothers book recommended by Seren is an excellent place to start if you're interested in mythological similarities.

Le meas,

KiNoRonin
January 15th, 2008, 11:12 AM
Konnichi Wa to All:

I just got a Message from someone from E-Sangha Message Forums that you might find Very Interesting!!!

Click on: http://www.celticbuddhism.org/index.htm

I have already clicked on it and I Like It!!!

I was thinking of suggesting such a Concept to you, but it seems that someone had already thought of such a thing back in the mid 1970s. So someone has beaten me to it.

So all there is for me to do is help this Concept by giving it some Free Publicity!

Ki No Ronin - 3X3

BenSt
January 15th, 2008, 04:34 PM
Konnichi Wa to All:

I just got a Message from someone from E-Sangha Message Forums that you might find Very Interesting!!!

Click on: http://www.celticbuddhism.org/index.htm

I have already clicked on it and I Like It!!!

I was thinking of suggesting such a Concept to you, but it seems that someone had already thought of such a thing back in the mid 1970s. So someone has beaten me to it.

So all there is for me to do is help this Concept by giving it some Free Publicity!

Ki No Ronin - 3X3

What makes it celtic though?

patch
January 15th, 2008, 05:29 PM
^ My thoughts exactly.
What makes it celtic?
Is it just buddhism in celtic countries? 0__o

KiNoRonin
January 15th, 2008, 05:30 PM
What makes it celtic though?


Click on the Link in my Previous Post and you will Find Out!

They have Buddhistic Style Collages that Depict Famous Ancient Celtic Mythical Gods, Goddesses and Characters.

KNR - 3X3

BenSt
January 15th, 2008, 08:36 PM
With respect though. That doesnt come close to what buddhism is... and neither does it coem close to what Celtic is.

I looked at the site and there really isn't anything there except vagueness.

What is remarkably celtic about Celtic Buddhism? What makes it different from Buddhism in general? Surely a single image or a collection of images does not a Path make...

After all, I can depict Buddha as a French revolutionary guard and call it Napoleonic Buddhism... but there wouldnt be anything there.

Agaliha
January 15th, 2008, 08:43 PM
I posted a thread some time ago about a site I found talking about a Vedic & Celtic connect, it's:Vedic and Celtic connections... would love comments (http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=102404&highlight=vedic)

KiNoRonin
January 16th, 2008, 12:36 PM
Here is a Picture of a Buddhistic Style Collage that has some some Major Celtic Characters included into it sush as Bridget and Cerunnos:

http://www.celticbuddhism.org/graphic_images/mandala-whole.jpg



KNR - 3X3

BenSt
January 16th, 2008, 02:43 PM
Here is a Picture of a Buddhistic Style Collage that has some some Major Celtic Characters included into it sush as Bridget and Cerunnos:

http://www.celticbuddhism.org/graphic_images/mandala-whole.jpg



KNR - 3X3

It's Buddhist not Buddhistic... and I have to say, yes its beautiful... but that doesn't alone make it Celtic Buddhism. Especially since, Buddhist Bodhisattvas and Celtic Gods are on a totally different plane and level. They're teachings are different.

haw_thrn
January 16th, 2008, 03:45 PM
hinduism and budhism are not the same thing for starters.

there is no actual documentation about druidic practices that come from non roman sources that i am aware of. there also has been much speculation to the authenticity of druidic records from roman sources. though it is said to be a practice of a concouring country to demonise a cultures people and practices. i would like to remind everyone reading this that rome had many religions in it's own city walls. some of which came from outside lands. Also Rome would have no reason to demonise a culture to justify concouring it. (especially one that gave the romans such a hard time. ) I believe they had no moral isues with concouring lands as it was benificial to the empire. this is entirely heresay however as i am just speculating.

I have heard some speculations as to the origin of druid practices coming from the same source as hinduism. I see no reason to completly disclaim this as the celts could have had contact with that culture. However their own take on these practices would have invariably changed over time as they traveled and came into contact with local cultures of other areas..(the celts were an invading culture too.)

quote=Galadraal;3405715]With respect though. That doesnt come close to what buddhism is... and neither does it coem close to what Celtic is.[/quote]

Though the concept if celtic buddhism is new to me i see no reason for there to be a problem with it. Providing that it is taught by realised practitoners. The founder was a close freind (or so the page says) of Chogyam Trungpa who was at one time a tibbetan lamma, and was insrtrumental in the spreading and teaching of tibetan buddhism world wide.

the practice of the way of buddha, is by it's very nature entirely devoid of religous and cultural systems. Invariably cultural aspects are picked up and applied to the practice. in whatever location it comes into. I can see no added benifit to calling it celtic.

buddhism by it's nature dosent even give a rats ass about buddha. Considering him to be a god or spirit in no way aids the practice and its entirely irrelivant whether or not he even actually existed.