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Laisrean
August 27th, 2007, 02:38 PM
Which is your favorite? I'm going to have to think before offering my own opinion, but there is a list on wikipedia of them, so I think for now I'll set up a poll of some of the more notable ones...

I would love to hear your thoughts. :cheers:

Zibblsnrt
August 27th, 2007, 04:06 PM
Molôn labe, baby!

LostSheep
August 27th, 2007, 04:49 PM
You forgot Camlann ... and if anyone says that that's mythological... I know it was real. :2G:

Pol
August 27th, 2007, 07:06 PM
God, that's a toughie.
I went with San Juan Hill, just because it's a personal point of interest for me.
Thermopylae, though it has become trendy in recent years, has always been a favourite of mine as well.
And of course The Alamo.
Iwo Jima was heartbreakingly tragic, as well..

ap Dafydd
August 28th, 2007, 08:09 AM
Never heard of most of them, and some of them I'd question whether they were last stands anyway or just situations where a small army was up against a larger one. I mean, Agincourt? The last stand of the English? Probably not...

Voted for Numantia, as you might expect, seeing as there weren't any Gaulish or British ones.

gwyn eich byd

Ffred

ModernKnight
October 10th, 2007, 12:52 PM
If there were survivors, it doesn't compare to Thermopylae.

I agree with the others, many of these aren't true last stands.

solinviticus
October 29th, 2007, 11:11 PM
Fall of Constantinople.

I just find it so romantic when Constantine XI cast off his imperial clothing and threw himself into the fray to die unfound by the Turks and just put together with all common soldiers slain. Sorta put things full circle, the last Roman emperor dieing a death with the common men, kinda returning to the more egalitarian roots of Rome.

Bettie
October 29th, 2007, 11:13 PM
I voted for Rorke's Drift... :)

Tanya
October 29th, 2007, 11:57 PM
I voted for Little Bighorn.. always love a battle where the Indians win..

but nearer and dearer to my cultural heart is Culloden.... as it changed the course of my family's history.

Theres
October 30th, 2007, 12:02 AM
I voted for Rorke's Drift... :)
this was my first thought too.

it's not generally known, at least not from the very excellent movie, that three days after the Zulus saluted the British troops bravery and left the farm they returned and killed them all to a man.

but man, what a stand!

Philosophia
October 30th, 2007, 02:23 AM
The battle of Long Tan holds significant meaning for me so I have to go with that one.

anoke
October 30th, 2007, 05:13 PM
Only a few of the list are "last stands" in the accepted military sense of the word.

Rorkes Drift was a hell of a fight, but not a last stand. And I am not sure that as suggested above it is correct that the Zulu's returned and wiped out the garrison 3 days later. By then most of the ZULU were either dead as the Brits took revenge for Isandalwana, or were hightailing it back to their Kraals in Zululand. Most of the Brits and others who fought that day went on to do other things with their lives after they left the army. Henry Hook, The private soldier, for example, who won the VC in the action in the hospital, made his living for a time telling and retelling the story on stage. He died in Gloucestershire in 1904. Lt Bromhead is buried at Allahabad in India. Another (name escapes me) from the Natal Native Contingent was buried at sea off the coast of Angola many years later - etc etc.

But the interesting inclusion in the list was the Battle of Long Tan which would only be known to the Australians on this board. Its from the Vietnam war where a company of Aussie infantry (Delta Company, 6 Btn Royal Australian Regiment - about 108 guys with artillery support from Nui Dat) bumped a full regiment of 2500 NVA regulars and fought them to a standstill in the pooring rain in a rubber pantation. The butcher sheet has 18 Aussies killed v/s 245 Vietnamese. Great heroics, but as they were eventually evacuated by carriers, it was not a last stand either.

gillian_greenleaf
November 4th, 2007, 12:50 AM
How about the Massacre of Wounded Knee?

Bettie
November 4th, 2007, 12:55 AM
Anoke, I agree with you about Long Tan, which is why i didn't vote for it...

But then I did vote for Rorke's Drift, so what the hell do I know?! :lol:

Tanya
November 15th, 2007, 07:16 PM
On further refelction, I think I vote for the Battle of Krojanty

Anoke, being the history powerhouse around here can perhaps expound further..

.. nothing is more noble or filled with pathos than the idea of the last of the Hussars charging Hitler's Panazers on horses.

SwordsFlameSong
December 4th, 2007, 10:14 PM
Thermopylae. Despite the recent rise in popularity of this one it was fascinating to me as a kid. And still is. Please to note the siggy quote. ;0)

I also found Long Tan very interesting as I tend to study the Viet Nam war but wouldn't call it a last stand. Though I am not Australian.

Little Big Horn cuz Custer got what he deserved. There was a wildfire there a few years back and archeologists have gone in and battlefield reconstructionists. Fascinating. They even found a foot still in a boot. The detris of wild growth had covered it all. Bullets and other bone fragments etc. There was a special done on this - I think it was on Unsolved History

Laisrean
December 4th, 2007, 11:40 PM
Little Big Horn cuz Custer got what he deserved. There was a wildfire there a few years back and archeologists have gone in and battlefield reconstructionists. Fascinating. They even found a foot still in a boot. The detris of wild growth had covered it all. Bullets and other bone fragments etc. There was a special done on this - I think it was on Unsolved History

I seen either that show or something similar to that, and on the show I watched they said Custer's men weren't fighting a heroic last stand, because the way the shell casings were found indicated they were massacred while fleeing from the battlefield, and there were more Indian rifle shells than their own which means they weren't fighting bravely as is commonly depicted.

SwordsFlameSong
December 4th, 2007, 11:52 PM
I seen either that show or something similar to that, and on the show I watched they said Custer's men weren't fighting a heroic last stand, because the way the shell casings were found indicated they were massacred while fleeing from the battlefield, and there were more Indian rifle shells than their own which means they weren't fighting bravely as is commonly depicted.

It was probably the same show. What Custer and his men faced was well beyond what they expected. They thought they were facing off with a few warriors and found themselves facing an army, of deservedly pissed off Native Americans. In this battle they were out-numbered and out-classed.

Which is expected since Custer made a name for going after women, children and the old when the men were out. He deserved the death he got. No insult to the Native Americans meant but Custer really wasn't the bravest and toughest military man in history. I always think of Johnny Cash's song "Custer" when I think of the real man.

Though, if I recall correctly, and it is a bit hazy - there was a knoll of some short where the forensic evidence showed that there were some of Custer's men who tried to hold that ground and did attempt to fight back. They failed obviously. I would hazard a guess that when they fell back some tried to regroup. Custer was a coward but he was still fronting a group of soldiers. Not all of them had a yellow streak down their backs.

Here in ND there's this fort where Custer lived. It's considered a landmark and is a tourist attraction. I have no desire to go to a place that lauds Custer.

Laisrean
December 5th, 2007, 12:35 AM
There's a statue of Custer in my hometown of Monroe Michigan, where he lived for short time with his wife (she is a native here, but he was actually from Ohio).

Its sad that the only person we could think of to make into our town hero is him...

SwordsFlameSong
December 5th, 2007, 08:39 AM
There's a statue of Custer in my hometown of Monroe Michigan, where he lived for short time with his wife (she is a native here, but he was actually from Ohio).

Its sad that the only person we could think of to make into our town hero is him...Is that lower or upper penninsula? I hail from Munising initially - UP.

I don't think Icould stomach seeing a statue of Custer on a regular basis. Blech.

Philosophia
December 5th, 2007, 09:31 AM
But the interesting inclusion in the list was the Battle of Long Tan which would only be known to the Australians on this board. Its from the Vietnam war where a company of Aussie infantry (Delta Company, 6 Btn Royal Australian Regiment - about 108 guys with artillery support from Nui Dat) bumped a full regiment of 2500 NVA regulars and fought them to a standstill in the pooring rain in a rubber pantation. The butcher sheet has 18 Aussies killed v/s 245 Vietnamese. Great heroics, but as they were eventually evacuated by carriers, it was not a last stand either.

I know but I still voted for it. It has a loose definition so it may fit under the guidelines. :)

Laisrean
December 5th, 2007, 09:16 PM
Is that lower or upper penninsula? I hail from Munising initially - UP.

I don't think Icould stomach seeing a statue of Custer on a regular basis. Blech.

Lower Michigan.

Not far from the statue there is a museum that features quite a few things on Custer, including letters he sent to his wife. One of the letters contained a lock of his golden hair that he was very proud of. It is on display there. He was apparently a very vain main.

SwordsFlameSong
December 5th, 2007, 09:24 PM
Lower Michigan.

Not far from the statue there is a museum that features quite a few things on Custer, including letters he sent to his wife. One of the letters contained a lock of his golden hair that he was very proud of. It is on display there. He was apparently a very vain main.

Well we can't all be from the UP.:T

Seriously though he was a vain man from all I have heard. I can remember how they used to teach the Indian Wars. Had a teacher in elementary school who just thought he was the greatest. I had a father who told me about history and thought he was a horrible man. So, I ask why it was a battle when the whites won and a massacre when the Indians won at Little Big Horn. She gaped. Then I asked why Custer was so great when he liked to raze villages when the men were hunting and how did killing women and children make him a hero.

I had to take a note home to my parents for my attitude. Dad patted me on the back. lol

Funny. One could argue I let my father's opinion color mine. Perhaps true when I was 8. But I have studied Custer in the numerous years since and I still don't see why he was touted as a hero. He was a coward and a bigot. A pompinjay.

~*Midnight Flame*~
November 3rd, 2008, 01:40 PM
You forgot Camlann ... and if anyone says that that's mythological... I know it was real. :2G:
My thoughts exactly! I agree with you entirely... :thumbsup:

monsnoleedra
November 3rd, 2008, 01:59 PM
Boy when you talk of Custer how can one forget Fetterman. Chasing those Indians into the hills and thinking he would just walk through.

Just for the record though I picked the Battle of Corregidor though I would have chosen the Battle for Wake Island had that been a choice. Back to the wall, no chance of victory or help.

*~Amora~*
November 3rd, 2008, 03:37 PM
It was a really close call between Thermopylae and Agincourt.

ninurta2008
April 27th, 2009, 04:46 PM
I picked the Other, which is the Battle for Nineveh, it was the last great battle of the Babylonians. I really don't know though, its just the only one I read about in depth.

TygerTyger
April 28th, 2009, 03:58 AM
Whilst the Battle of Thermopylae has always been one of my favourites it was not a 'last stand' in so far as the largest part of the allied Greek army safely withdrew before the conclusion.

Whilst the Spartans held the pass they were assisted by 700 Thespians and 400 Thebans and the Spartan Helots who remained with their King; some 1500 men altogether and not the 300 portrayed in the movie.

I voted 'other' and would recommend the Battle of Senlac Ridge, now called Hastings, from 1066. As is usual in history this battle is normally told from the perspective of the victors and the Norman Conquest is often portrayed as inevitable; it was not. The Saxons fought from early morning and came very close to winning against supposedly 'superior' troops. The battle went on into the night with the Saxons refusing to surrender and battling as hard as the Spartans had done over the body of their own King, Harold who was not killed by an arrow in the eye. The largest part of Harlod's army was slain at Senlac Ridge and the Saxon way of life came to an end.

It was indeed a poetic last stand of the Saxons.

Telluride
May 2nd, 2009, 11:41 AM
Remember the Alamo! :thumbsup:

LostSheep
May 2nd, 2009, 11:47 AM
I voted 'other' and would recommend the Battle of Senlac Ridge, now called Hastings, from 1066. As is usual in history this battle is normally told from the perspective of the victors and the Norman Conquest is often portrayed as inevitable; it was not. The Saxons fought from early morning and came very close to winning against supposedly 'superior' troops. The battle went on into the night with the Saxons refusing to surrender and battling as hard as the Spartans had done over the body of their own King, Harold who was not killed by an arrow in the eye. The largest part of Harlod's army was slain at Senlac Ridge and the Saxon way of life came to an end.

It was indeed a poetic last stand of the Saxons.

But then of course, Harold was fielding a weakened side after his victory over Harald Hardråde at Stamford Bridge. That's always the trouble with these fixture clashes, isn't it.