PDA

View Full Version : Parallels between Bhuddism and Taoism



Cool Music Guy
September 29th, 2007, 03:34 PM
The paths of Bhuddism and Taoism contain numerous parallels and in today's modern world of New Age spirituality, it might be beneficial to those familiar with either one of these two paths to draw corollaries between these two spiritual systems. The obvious reason for this would be that some hidden nugget of wisdom might reveal itself to the seeker.

The first parallel that could be drawn is that both Bhuddism and Taoism attempt to reduce the amount of desire within the individual psyche, so as to reduce the anxiety and discomfort present in the turbulence of Samsara.

Any others?:reading:

BenSt
September 29th, 2007, 03:43 PM
Thsi is best suited for the eastern paths section.

Moving there...

It really isnt a surprise that Buddhism and Daoism are related and have parrelels... since both systems became syncretized in Japan and Korea... and to a great extent in C hina

Shanti
September 29th, 2007, 04:03 PM
I guess it all depends on what Buddhism and Taoism one is following.

The interpretations of various teachings are as individual as we are.
The reason behind sects of Buddhism is the same as for all religious sects, not all Buddhist agree. And Taoism isn't a religion. Taoism cant be taught. Thats one of the first things told in the Tao Te Ching.

I don't see Taoism teaching lowering desire to obtain anything.
I do see it teaching to empty oneself of all you have learned to make room for a new self discovery.
I see it teaching no mind.
I see it teaching that everything is exactly as it should be.

Common between the two...
they both teach to find your own truths.
They both teach you to not just believe what you are told but to test it for yourself to see if it fits.
They both teach that there is no paved road for you to walk, only a path you must create for yourself.

So thats this individuals perspective. :)

Cool Music Guy
September 29th, 2007, 05:42 PM
Galadraal

I know that this thread belongs in the Eastern subsection of the "Paths" section, but I posted a similar thread in this subsection and it has yet to get any response and only has a dozen or so total views, so I posted this thread in the main "Paths" section so it could be shared with more of the community here at MW....:ringaroun

Cool Music Guy
September 29th, 2007, 06:02 PM
I guess it all depends on what Buddhism and Taoism one is following.

The interpretations of various teachings are as individual as we are.
The reason behind sects of Buddhism is the same as for all religious sects, not all Buddhist agree. And Taoism isn't a religion. Taoism cant be taught. Thats one of the first things told in the Tao Te Ching.

I don't see Taoism teaching lowering desire to obtain anything.
I do see it teaching to empty oneself of all you have learned to make room for a new self discovery.
I see it teaching no mind.
I see it teaching that everything is exactly as it should be.

Common between the two...
they both teach to find your own truths.
They both teach you to not just believe what you are told but to test it for yourself to see if it fits.
They both teach that there is no paved road for you to walk, only a path you must create for yourself.

So thats this individuals perspective. :)

Shanti, here is the Legge translation of the first part of the Tao te Ching...


1


The Tao that can be trodden is not the enduring and unchanging Tao. The name that can be named is not the enduring and unchanging name.


(Conceived of as) having no name, it is the Originator of heaven and earth; (conceived of as) having a name, it is the Mother of all things.


Always without desire we must be found, If its deep mystery we would sound; But if desire always within us be, Its outer fringe is all that we shall see.


Under these two aspects, it is really the same; but as development takes place, it receives the different names. Together we call them the Mystery. Where the Mystery is the deepest is the gate of all that is subtle and wonderful.

The concept of "no desire" in order to gain the deep mystery of the Tao is present in the first section of the ancient text, and similar concepts are found throughout. Of course, you are free to interpret the words of the ancient text in any way that you wish, and if you believe that Taoism does not teach the renunciation or at least the lowering of desire, then you certainly are entitled to your interpretation.

As far as Taoism not being a religion, it depends on how one percieves the word religion. I agree with you that it is not a religion.
Can Taoism be taught? I don't know. But I would not be so bold as to make the dogmatic assertion that it absolutely cannot be taught, because there might always be pesky little philosophical exceptions to any absolute. I am not claiming that there are "absolutely no absolutes," only that they are far more rare than most would like to believe.

However, I wholeheartedly agree with your assertions that both paths teach an individual's responsibility to create her/his own path...

That may be one of the most important commonalities between the two paths...:spinnysmi

BenSt
September 29th, 2007, 06:03 PM
Galadraal

I know that this thread belongs in the Eastern subsection of the "Paths" section, but I posted a similar thread in this subsection and it has yet to get any response and only has a dozen or so total views, so posted this thread in the main "Paths" section so it could be shared with more of the community here at MW....:ringaroun

There are reasons why I moved it, please check your mailbox :)

Shanti
September 29th, 2007, 11:24 PM
Shanti, here is the Legge translation of the first part of the Tao te Ching...


1


The Tao that can be trodden is not the enduring and unchanging Tao. The name that can be named is not the enduring and unchanging name.


(Conceived of as) having no name, it is the Originator of heaven and earth; (conceived of as) having a name, it is the Mother of all things.


Always without desire we must be found, If its deep mystery we would sound; But if desire always within us be, Its outer fringe is all that we shall see.


Under these two aspects, it is really the same; but as development takes place, it receives the different names. Together we call them the Mystery. Where the Mystery is the deepest is the gate of all that is subtle and wonderful.

The concept of "no desire" in order to gain the deep mystery of the Tao is present in the first section of the ancient text, and similar concepts are found throughout. Of course, you are free to interpret the words of the ancient text in any way that you wish, and if you believe that Taoism does not teach the renunciation or at least the lowering of desire, then you certainly are entitled to your interpretation.

As far as Taoism not being a religion, it depends on how one percieves the word religion. I agree with you that it is not a religion.
Can Taoism be taught? I don't know. But I would not be so bold as to make the dogmatic assertion that it absolutely cannot be taught, because there might always be pesky little philosophical exceptions to any absolute. I am not claiming that there are "absolutely no absolutes," only that they are far more rare than most would like to believe.

However, I wholeheartedly agree with your assertions that both paths teach an individual's responsibility to create her/his own path...

That may be one of the most important commonalities between the two paths...:spinnysmi



As I said its all up to personal interpretation and perspective.
I know the Tao Te Ching and have translated myself from my perspective.
My post was stated as being my perspectives only.
That's the beauty of both Taoism and Buddhism, there is no right or wrong way. There is only one way, your own way.

And this translation is someone else's way of understanding it. Its not my way of understanding.

To lesson desire one needs to know it well first. You can not lesson until you build.
Also as you grow and find your way, your desire will follow the path your on.
By just looking for ourselves we are in desire.
Desire is normal and natural. Its excess in either direction that can be a prob. But in order to be balanced, you need to know what the extreme feels like or you have nothing to compare for your own self.
Knowing through just see in others in extremes isnt the same as feeling the experience yourself. Once you have experienced extreme, balance is most noticeable and pleasurable.

You can not empty a cup unless it is first full.

Cool Music Guy
September 30th, 2007, 02:58 PM
This website has eighty-five English translations of the Tao te Ching...

http://home.pages.at/onkellotus/TTK/_IndexTTK.html

Just scroll down to the bottom of the page...

Shanti
September 30th, 2007, 03:01 PM
This website has eighty-five English translations of the Tao te Ching...

http://home.pages.at/onkellotus/TTK/_IndexTTK.html

Just scroll down to the bottom of the page...
Got an error that page cant be found.

But yeah there are alot of different translations and even the translations can be viewed differently from person to person.
What one feels a translation is meaning isn't necessarily going to be what another one feels the meaning is.

Cool Music Guy
October 1st, 2007, 03:48 PM
Got an error that page cant be found.

But yeah there are alot of different translations and even the translations can be viewed differently from person to person.
What one feels a translation is meaning isn't necessarily going to be what another one feels the meaning is.


I just tried the link on multiple computers and connections, and it works just fine.