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View Full Version : Jesse Jackson criticizes Obama for 'acting white'



Laisrean
October 5th, 2007, 07:22 AM
http://www.thestate.com/local/v-print/story/177514.html


Jackson sharply criticized presidential hopeful and Illinois Sen. Barack Obama for “acting like he’s white” in what Jackson said has been a tepid response to six black juveniles’ arrest on attempted-murder charges in Jena, La. Jackson, who also lives in Illinois, endorsed Obama in March, according to The Associated Press.

“If I were a candidate, I’d be all over Jena,” Jackson said after an hour-long speech at Columbia’s historically black Benedict College.

SwordsFlameSong
October 5th, 2007, 07:44 AM
Jesse Jackson is not a canidate.

And dang judgemental of him to say Obama is acting white. He's a man. Seems to me Jesse needs to quit seeing issues along the lines of race. Seems bigoted to me.

LadyWinter
October 5th, 2007, 07:50 AM
If I said to someone..."Quit acting black" I would be labeled a racist by many people...What does a white person act like? How do you define that statement without being racist?

Winter
drinking coffee in her suit at her office (am I acting white or black?)

Agaliha
October 5th, 2007, 08:18 AM
And dang judgemental of him to say Obama is acting white. He's a man. Seems to me Jesse needs to quit seeing issues along the lines of race. Seems bigoted to me.

I agree.

Amythyst
October 5th, 2007, 09:03 AM
Jesse Jackson criticizes Obama for 'acting white'

Hmmm...is "acting white" a bad thing?

Has anyone ever been accused of "acting black"?

Philosophia
October 5th, 2007, 09:20 AM
He's in the same league as Bill O'Reilly. Both are idiots. :)

WitchJezebel
October 5th, 2007, 09:33 AM
Jesse Jackson is a dumbass. He's an attention whore and since no one is talking about him right now he's got to spew some ignorant, racist crap to stir things up and get his mug back on the news.

Dumbass.

CoolJ
October 5th, 2007, 09:33 AM
Ohhh. Dis.

... idiot.

Mesektet
October 5th, 2007, 09:37 AM
If you were a candidate Jackson...well you were and we saw what happened there...

Tullip Troll
October 5th, 2007, 09:38 AM
Winter
drinking coffee in her suit at her office (am I acting white or black?)

whats in your coffee and what hand are you drinking it with ; )

banondraig
October 5th, 2007, 01:21 PM
If you were a candidate Jackson...well you were and we saw what happened there...

:thumbsup:

SwordsFlameSong
October 5th, 2007, 01:23 PM
Besides, what does this have to do with Obama's platform? It's as stupid as the media going on about how he is nolonger wearing a flag lapel pin.

SwordsFlameSong
October 5th, 2007, 01:27 PM
Jesse Jackson is a dumbass. He's an attention whore and since no one is talking about him right now he's got to spew some ignorant, racist crap to stir things up and get his mug back on the news.

Dumbass.

And there it is. :)

BlackLili
October 5th, 2007, 01:34 PM
Man, Jackson just can't shut up, can he?

Personally, of the "front-runners" I'm more in favor of Obama simply because he makes statements that make sense. When this bullhonky went on with Limbaugh, and the Senate was taking a vote whether to denounce him or not, Obama declined to vote because the issue was a smokescreen and drawing attention away from real issues.

I didn't think I'd ever hear a candidate turn down a chance to mug for the cameras just because it took attention away from real issues. But then, its possible that was his calculated attempt for attention, too. ;)

wolfjan1
October 5th, 2007, 01:56 PM
Very bigoted. Jesse WAS a candidate, and you saw how far that got him.

Snapdragon
October 5th, 2007, 02:49 PM
Reverend Jackson has participated in many worthy endeavors and supported progressive causes in his lifetime; for that, I admire and thank him.

He is not particularly radical, and so has compromised with existing power--a salient example of this being his unfailing loyalty to the "Democratic" Party. He is personally flawed, as it appears to me all of us are; I find it easy to dismiss criticisms of his temperament from those who have never confronted racist mobs, who never hesitated to cast the first stone.

That said, I think that any talk about a person being of some other color is at best suspect. If someone is caricaturing someone of another ethnic or racial group, sure, I can see how that is not okay. However, saying that there is some kind of norm or standard to which you should conform because you are X color or race...that's nonsense. Where is the standard? Who sets it?

Rev. Jackson has spewed drivel, and I hope someone he'll listen to can point this out to him.

LadyWinter
October 5th, 2007, 03:03 PM
whats in your coffee and what hand are you drinking it with ; )

:hehehe: :fpraiseyo :fpraiseyo :crylaugh:

SphinYote
October 5th, 2007, 05:31 PM
:T OK, OT fun.

Ouch. Drinking coffee with your hands would burn. Personally I prefer a cup.

Actually, how would you drink coffee with your hands? Would be an interesting change from using my mouth. Do fingers have taste buds?

Hmmm, now you went and gave me a caffeine craving....

Back on topic, I did see that in the news earlier and I thought it rather racist and bigoted....then concerned myself with other things more worthy of my time.....

Yote

Wicce
October 5th, 2007, 06:07 PM
Other black people themselves talk about another person of their race 'acting white', not just Jesse Jackson. and while I find this particular situation to be ridiculous, I'm not going to be the person to tell them how to work their issues out or underestimate just how deep the frustration against cultural indoctrination runs. How many people in this thread are black?

SwordsFlameSong
October 5th, 2007, 06:37 PM
What gives Jackson the right to accuse another man of acting too white? Whatever happened to looking at a man on the basis of what he is and not what color his skin is? I don't look at people on the basis of their outer appearanc but on the quality of what is there beneath the skin.

Maybe not the same thing but I have been judged harshly for being a woman. My personal favorite comment was a guy telling me one day I would realize I was female and enjoy it just because I am interested in military history and the mechanics of warfare. I remember how denigrated I felt. As if my gender should determine what my interests are and where my abilities reside.

That is the first thing I thought of when I read what Jesse Jackson said about Obama. And how rotten it feels to be defined on such a narrow yardstick.

Jess Jackson is a very literate and intelligent man. A man who happens to be black, he should be able to see how his own words can sound. I am sure he has faced enough bigotry in his time on earth. In this case, I think he sounded bigoted.

One way or the other, it is time to stop defining men and women by the color of their skin, their gender, their religious or sexual preferences- but as individuals who stand apart due to their own abilities, accomplishments and stance.. etc

blithespirit
October 5th, 2007, 08:50 PM
To quote South Park:

Token: Jesse Jackson is not the emperor of black people!

Stan: He told my dad he was.

Autumn
October 5th, 2007, 11:06 PM
I'm white.

This "Black enough?" crap has been happening to Obama right along and it's so lame. seems people would rather pass judgment than see a potential historical first. A black man as US president. Successful black folks often face this and I sometimes wonder if it's a form of jealousy on the part of those who haven't worked hard enough to get somewhere.

For 200 years the power elite in the United States has been White Anglo Saxon Protestant Males. One step in the process of changing this is adopting some of the values so that these values can be changed from within. Of course the first black man in the Whitehouse will share many of the WASP values. Once the idea of a black man as commander in chief becomes more commonplace then the need to conform to WASP expectations will be less important.

I wonder if they would say this if he had emerged from the right instead of the left?

David19
October 6th, 2007, 09:37 AM
What gives Jackson the right to accuse another man of acting too white? Whatever happened to looking at a man on the basis of what he is and not what color his skin is? I don't look at people on the basis of their outer appearanc but on the quality of what is there beneath the skin.

Maybe not the same thing but I have been judged harshly for being a woman. My personal favorite comment was a guy telling me one day I would realize I was female and enjoy it just because I am interested in military history and the mechanics of warfare. I remember how denigrated I felt. As if my gender should determine what my interests are and where my abilities reside.

That is the first thing I thought of when I read what Jesse Jackson said about Obama. And how rotten it feels to be defined on such a narrow yardstick.

Jess Jackson is a very literate and intelligent man. A man who happens to be black, he should be able to see how his own words can sound. I am sure he has faced enough bigotry in his time on earth. In this case, I think he sounded bigoted.

One way or the other, it is time to stop defining men and women by the color of their skin, their gender, their religious or sexual preferences- but as individuals who stand apart due to their own abilities, accomplishments and stance.. etc

I agree with you, people shouldn't be judged by their skin colour, culture, religion, whatever, etc - it's you act what you can do that should count.

SwordsFlameSong
October 6th, 2007, 10:14 AM
I agree with you, people shouldn't be judged by their skin colour, culture, religion, whatever, etc - it's you act what you can do that should count.

I guess my biggest problem is that someone who has faced bigotry should not perpetuate it.

When it comes down to it there are a lot of us who have faced some form of bigotry in our lives. We don't have to be black for that to happen. We have color biases, religious biases, gender biases, age biases etcetera.

David19
October 6th, 2007, 10:54 AM
I guess my biggest problem is that someone who has faced bigotry should not perpetuate it.

When it comes down to it there are a lot of us who have faced some form of bigotry in our lives. We don't have to be black for that to happen. We have color biases, religious biases, gender biases, age biases etcetera.

That's true, everyone will be picked on for some reason, there are many different types of bigots - some pick on others due to sexual orientation, religion, culture, skin colour, class, even what politics you're into, etc.

SwordsFlameSong
October 6th, 2007, 11:03 AM
That's true, everyone will be picked on for some reason, there are many different types of bigots - some pick on others due to sexual orientation, religion, culture, skin colour, class, even what politics you're into, etc.

Sadly enough.

I am not the greatest fan of Jesse Jackson. I don't know why. I can logically see that he is intelligent and he is a powerful speaker. With that being said, I was very disappointed in him when I read his remark to Obama.

Then again, I think there have been better leaders in the black community then Jackson. Martin Luther King Jr for one.

banondraig
October 6th, 2007, 11:09 AM
I wonder if they would say this if he had emerged from the right instead of the left?

Then it's even more likely he'd be considered an "Uncle Tom", "Oreo", whatever. Look at the flap around Clarence Thomas, and he wasn't even a "first black".

SweetIsTheTruth
October 6th, 2007, 11:33 AM
I am not the greatest fan of Jesse Jackson. I don't know why.

Well given Jesse's reference to Jews as 'hymies' and New York as 'hymietown' in the 80s, it's obvious the man has some prejudices of his own to battle. Oddly enough, Jesse made those comments leading up to a presidential election as well.

This more recent incident regarding Obama reminded me of my school days. At one point in time, I went to an all black high school with only 6 white kids out of about 1500. Everybody in the school knew me since I stuck out like a sore thumb! This was on the cusp of 79/80.

In those days, there were a few black kids who would tease other black kids who did well in school or spoke 'too proper,' as 'acting white.' I didn't understand it then and I don't understand it now. I am sure this sort of thing still goes on, but I would doubt it continues to the extent it did in those days. We have so many upwardly mobile lawyers, doctors, etc who are black now who wouldn't dare allow their kids to devalue education in that manner.

SSanf
October 6th, 2007, 11:58 AM
Does any rational person on this planet harbor any kind of a doubt that Jesse Jackson is a racist? Has that ever even been a question in anyone's mind? Has he ever even tried to hide it?

A flaming racist made a racist comment. So?

SSanf
October 6th, 2007, 12:01 PM
What gives Jackson the right to accuse another man of acting too white?
Uh, that would be the First Amendment.

banondraig
October 6th, 2007, 12:40 PM
What gives Jackson the right to accuse another man of acting too white?



Uh, that would be the First Amendment.

That's true. The First Amendment gives us the right to make flagrantly unjustified and/or stupid comments.


Whatever happened to looking at a man on the basis of what he is and not what color his skin is? I don't look at people on the basis of their outer appearanc but on the quality of what is there beneath the skin.

Maybe not the same thing but I have been judged harshly for being a woman. My personal favorite comment was a guy telling me one day I would realize I was female and enjoy it just because I am interested in military history and the mechanics of warfare. I remember how denigrated I felt. As if my gender should determine what my interests are and where my abilities reside.

That is the first thing I thought of when I read what Jesse Jackson said about Obama. And how rotten it feels to be defined on such a narrow yardstick.

Jess Jackson is a very literate and intelligent man. A man who happens to be black, he should be able to see how his own words can sound. I am sure he has faced enough bigotry in his time on earth. In this case, I think he sounded bigoted.

One way or the other, it is time to stop defining men and women by the color of their skin, their gender, their religious or sexual preferences- but as individuals who stand apart due to their own abilities, accomplishments and stance.. etc

:thumbsup:

*GrumpButt*
October 6th, 2007, 01:13 PM
Errrr...

Ok how does being an intelligent well spoken person makes you act white?

Yeah... I guess then , in his mind, people that are not intelligent and well spoken are acting black? Does he not see that the statement he made can be seen as a slur against all the things he has worked for?

Makes tons of sense doesn't it? :wtf:

Laisrean
October 6th, 2007, 01:21 PM
"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

If Jesse Jackson is criticizing Obama for not being black enough, then isn't he contradicting MLK's dream?

banondraig
October 6th, 2007, 02:27 PM
"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

If Jesse Jackson is criticizing Obama for not being black enough, then isn't he contradicting MLK's dream?

Yes.

Apparently Jesse Jackson has a different dream. I don't think I want to know what it is, though.

David19
October 6th, 2007, 06:03 PM
"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

If Jesse Jackson is criticizing Obama for not being black enough, then isn't he contradicting MLK's dream?

Yes, and I don't think Jackson can even compare to Martin Luther King Jr. who was a great man, and, IMO, a hero.

Jesse Jackson, like SSanf said, is just a racist, just like the KKK or other bigots, and after hearing what SweetisTruth said about Jackson making those anti-Semitic comments, I'm surprised people still listen to him or give him any attention at all (you know, I think Jackson and Mel Gibson would probably get along great, don't you think?).

BTW, this is kind of OT, but is he any relation to Michael Jackson at all?.

Sequoia
October 6th, 2007, 06:59 PM
So what, JJ won't be happy until Obama wears a 'do-rag' and speaks without any concern for grammar or usage? Is that what he means by "being black"? Because that seems like the opposite of what Obama is doing right now, being clean-cut and well-spoken.

"YO YO YO WHAT UP AMERICA? OBAMA IN DA HIZHOUSE, YO!"

I never understood the idea of perpetuating stereotypes. Seems that the good reverend would see them made into personal law.

I just don't see why acting like any other educated human being would be considered "bad". I don't see what Obama is doing wrong, and while I'm not black, I sure as hell would hope that if I WAS black, I would value eloquence and success.

What is with Jackson trying to enforce stereotypes?

SwordsFlameSong
October 6th, 2007, 09:37 PM
Uh, that would be the First Amendment.
True. Though my question was more rhetorical.

Jesse Jackson has never been one to take care with his own hatespeak.

sarabethv
October 6th, 2007, 09:53 PM
So, does this mean that black people shouldn't vote for him, even if they think he is the best candidate because he isn't black "enough?" *sarcasm* I suppose, if we take it to the logical conclusion that because Obama isn't acting black that they should vote for a white woman instead (presumably Hillary acts white and womanly).

banondraig
October 7th, 2007, 10:38 AM
So, does this mean that black people shouldn't vote for him, even if they think he is the best candidate because he isn't black "enough?" *sarcasm* I suppose, if we take it to the logical conclusion that because Obama isn't acting black that they should vote for a white woman instead . . .

No, they should vote for whoever Jesse Jackson tells them to (or so he seems to think), which would be Jesse Jackson if he had a prayer of getting elected. He is just throwing a fit of sour grapes because another guy is likely to be the first major-party black presidential candidate.


(presumably Hillary acts white and womanly).


No, that's Laura Bush. She was a schoolteacher and she bakes cookies. :rolleyes:

Laisrean
October 7th, 2007, 11:13 AM
No, that's Laura Bush. She was a schoolteacher and she bakes cookies. :rolleyes:

Correction: She still is a schoolteacher. Just this time, the one she is trying to teach to read and write is her husband.


...and I suppose the cookies are his reward for a job well done.

CoolJ
October 7th, 2007, 11:15 AM
No, that's Laura Bush. She was a schoolteacher and she bakes cookies. :rolleyes:

Oh and don't forget, that's "not even a real job"

David19
October 7th, 2007, 11:56 AM
...and I suppose the cookies are his reward for a job well done.

and pretzels are probably used when he gets things wrong....

banondraig
October 7th, 2007, 12:21 PM
Oh and don't forget, that's "not even a real job"

Which, the teaching of school or the baking of cookies?