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Libris
November 6th, 2007, 04:54 PM
Does anyone else out there homestead or interested in homesteading, mini-farming etc...?

We have a little farm (about 2 acres), with chickens and a large garden. I like the idea of raising my own food and having a place to worship outside. I think that some homesteading ideals coincide nicely with heathen ideals, so I wouldn't be surprized if there are quite a few pagan homesteaders out there.

So fess up, who likes to homestead? Who out there dreams of having a little farm, raising their own food and filling up a pantry with home canned goods?

:fpoke:

aranarose
November 6th, 2007, 05:00 PM
I'm working on in. I live in the city right now, and am slowly working on putting my life in order so that I can homestead and be where I want to be. Winter is hitting where I'm at, but I'm hoping to put together a small indoor garden soon, and then in the spring, plant a garden outside. I have a decent size backyard, and could easily convert a good chunk of it to a garden. Want to grow primarily vegetables and herbs, but have a few flowers as well.

Can't exactly have farm animals in the city, though have thought about getting a few hens. I noticed the other day that a neighbor around the corner has four, and I would love to have fresh eggs around here! Don't want a rooster, too mean and noisy at times!

Tanya
November 6th, 2007, 06:01 PM
^^^^puts down composting pitchfork with a big ole "yuuuuuuuuuuuuup"

350 acres of organic farm, bushland and pasture...

I love eating off my place, and it does seem a really rigth way to live as a pagan.

It was one of the things that brought my husband and I together, and hold us together through the rough spots... \

my parents were part of the first hippie wave out to the sticks, so for me, chickens and 1001 things to do with zuchinni is a way of life... My husband is another generation... he grew up, I swear, on the set of the Waltons.

we've bene on the place 2 years, currently we get most of our meat, vegies and seasonings off the place, the orchard is begun, but so far we've got 1 apricot to show for it, and a handful of olives.... patience patience patience....

lamoka
November 6th, 2007, 07:19 PM
5 acres.. 3000 sf late 1800's victorian home (under construction for the past 5 years) large garden, 4 dogs, 2 cats, 2 birds, 2 children, one fish, three horses of our own, but board occassionally for others, one beef cow on the way.. I wonder if I'm missing anything.. we grow and eat organic (or buy when we don't grow or can't grow :) )
crap kickers and carharts are a way of life!!!!
aho

halfwaynowhere
November 6th, 2007, 08:41 PM
I would love to someday. Right now we live in the suburbs, with a decent sized yard, but too small to do a whole lot in. i don't exactly have a green thumb, i killed all of the herbs i was growing. Right now my mom is really into making jelly. since we don't have anything really growing, she's getting fruit from friends with trees, and exchanging some of her jellies. I think its a fun little thing, and a tiny step in the right direction. we want to get chickens so we can have fresh eggs. we used to have four hens, and they were a lot of fun, and the eggs were really nice. my mom's dog would probably kill chickens, though, so until we figure out a way to keep them away from the dog and still let them have some free range, no chickens. I think that if we want to get into any sort of homesteading, it would sort of have to be a network of people in the area, each working on a few things, and then trading our stuff. Urban homesteading, i guess...

Libris
November 7th, 2007, 09:41 AM
we want to get chickens so we can have fresh eggs. we used to have four hens, and they were a lot of fun, and the eggs were really nice. my mom's dog would probably kill chickens, though, so until we figure out a way to keep them away from the dog and still let them have some free range, no chickens.

Oh Oh, have you looked into chicken tractors? They're basically smallish cages that you keep a few chickens in with a little shelter/nest box. The cages are small enough to move around your yard, yet they keep the chickens somewhat enclosed. So the chickens are free-range, but safe. If you google 'chicken tractor' you'll find tons more information and patterns to build your own. They're also great because the chickens, if left in one area long enough, will tear up the ground and prepare it for a garden, just like a tiller.

There is also this really neat book called "Food Not Lawns (http://www.amazon.com/Food-Not-Lawns-Neighborhood-Community/dp/193339207X)" about urban homesteading and creating community in suburban settings.

I have a large PDF file that has scans of homestead garden plans for under one acre, basic info on chicken tractors and other interesting things, if you want I can send it to you. Actually, if anyone wants the file, just PM me with your email addy and I'll send it to you. It's large (~20mb) but very cool!


5 acres.. 3000 sf late 1800's victorian home (under construction for the past 5 years) large garden, 4 dogs, 2 cats, 2 birds, 2 children, one fish, three horses of our own, but board occassionally for others, one beef cow on the way.. I wonder if I'm missing anything.. we grow and eat organic (or buy when we don't grow or can't grow :) )
crap kickers and carharts are a way of life!!!!
aho

Sounds lovely! I'm so jealous, we don't have room for larger livestock at the moment. The area around us is all fallow pasture that's currently tied up in estate. I'd love to buy or lease some of it!



^^^^puts down composting pitchfork with a big ole "yuuuuuuuuuuuuup"

350 acres of organic farm, bushland and pasture...

we've bene on the place 2 years, currently we get most of our meat, vegies and seasonings off the place, the orchard is begun, but so far we've got 1 apricot to show for it, and a handful of olives.... patience patience patience....

350 acres? Nice! My parents were sort of back to the land hippies too, well in my dad's case it was that he lived through the last bit of the great depression so he was always concerned with food security. I hope that our little place will bring my husband and I closer too, we have fun fixing it up and taking care of the garden together.





Can't exactly have farm animals in the city, though have thought about getting a few hens. I noticed the other day that a neighbor around the corner has four, and I would love to have fresh eggs around here! Don't want a rooster, too mean and noisy at times!

I wish I could send you a few of mine, we still have a few to many for the size of our hen house. Have you thought about what breed you'd like? If you want eggs and not meat, if you can find them, you might try a hamburg. They're small, but they lay decent sized eggs and lay more eggs for the same amount of feed than almost any other chicken breed. Of all the breeds though, I like Brahmas the best. They're more of a multipurpose breed, but they make great pets too. They're very gentle and friendly. Our Brahma rooster follows us everywhere hopping for some scraps. He's like a dog, I swear. But he's not very good at protecting the hens, so we have a Blue Andalusian rooster too. We bought a mix of 25 chicks from McMurry hatchery last spring, I highly recommend them. But of course, you have to buy 25, so unless you want 25 chicks they're not so great. Feed stores often have chicks in the spring though, and you can usually buy 5 or so.


Ok, sorry I've rambled on way to much!

Happy Homesteading all

vulfsung
November 7th, 2007, 12:48 PM
The savings is split between university fund for the Kid, and going off the grid in ten years.

We have our eye on a parcel of land in the 400 acre range. Right now it's owned by a cousin, who actually has over 1500 acres. She's considering selling it since it's mostly bush and wild, but there is a few acres that are suitable for building.

I figure we need to hold out on suburban life for only ten years-then the house will be paid off, the kid will have a drivers license, and then, blam, we're outta here.

In the meantime, I have converted a large protion of our backyard to garden, and took up canning this year, so we are less reliant on freezing. Husband's job its to put meat on the table, and bring me the skins of the food animals. Unfortunately, we cannot even have chickens where we are...I know animal services is tired of hearing me complain about it, but I realy think I should be allowed one goat. I mean really, a pygmy goat is smaller than my dog, the poo is compostable, and goats are way quieter than all the dogs barking around here.

halfwaynowhere
November 7th, 2007, 03:58 PM
wow, thanks for that idea about the chicken tractors. i'd never heard of them before... if we could figure out a way to make one thats mastiff-proof, it might work.

Tanya
November 7th, 2007, 05:52 PM
strangley, as I was walking around Canberra's older suburbs and then my job took me to a new 'eco-friendly' burb under construction I started think about "block size"

In the older neighborhoods the houses are small and theblocks of land are largish, and most people are a bit older and have lovely gardens. They are very pleasent to walk through..

In the new burbs the houses fill completely the tiny blocks of land, with little or no room for anything but a driveway.. they are a McDoland's sort of hell....

and I started thinking about our current water crisis here in Eastern Australia... and how part of my own family plan of action is to be raising more vegies this year than ever, because I expect vegi prices to go through the roof. ( tomatoes already cost $9 a kilo!) Even though we are pretty comfortable, I can see us going broke if we have to pay those kind of prices...

and then I kinda twigged to why maybe suburbs used to have fairly large blocks.... so you can grow even in the city most of your own food.... radical isn't it... but my parents started on an acre when i was little and had an orchard, strawberry patch, chickens, rabbits, bees and a large vegi garden....on good land, 1 acre is plenty.

it isn't so much that we can't grow all we need, but that we can't grow all we want Think about this.. we need fruit and veg, we want strawberries in december...apples and dry fruit got our grandparents through winter.... its about exceptations as much as what we can grow. ....

since we discovered tea will probably grow on our place... the thought of shuttign the gates has leaped a bit closer... because we REALLY REALLY want our caffine. :)

Those of you in the burbs have a read of Noah's Garden: Restoring the Ecology of Our Own Backyards: by Sara B. Stein.. she's amazing...

vulfsung
November 8th, 2007, 01:11 PM
I think you are quite right about growing on small plots of land. Living in the city, for me, has proven it can be done. In a 100' x 80' lot I have grown enough to keep our veggie cost way down over the winter (sadly we're nearing that 9$ mark for tomatoes too, but that happens when they are shipped from california), while we still enjoyed much of the harvest as it came. It's about using the space you have, and preserving what is more than one can use at the time.

I think the preservation of our foods is just as important as the growing of it. Yes, I want strawberries in December, so, I spend a few dollars at the u-pick farm, pick a bunch of baskets, we eat as much as we want, then I preserve what's left. Jams, berries in syrups, freeze, whatever strikes the families taste buds. That way, I'm not paying ridiculous prices for shipped, wooden tasting berries.

Ideally, for me, the concept of that large acreage is to get away from the humans around me. That and to be able to have livestock. Animal control here is very anal about any sort of livestock in the city, so if it doesn't bark or meow, it's not allowed. I want cattle, a couple curly horses, and a small herd of buffalo.

I'll have to check out that book, sounds interesting.





and I started thinking about our current water crisis here in Eastern Australia... and how part of my own family plan of action is to be raising more vegies this year than ever, because I expect vegi prices to go through the roof. ( tomatoes already cost $9 a kilo!) Even though we are pretty comfortable, I can see us going broke if we have to pay those kind of prices...

and then I kinda twigged to why maybe suburbs used to have fairly large blocks.... so you can grow even in the city most of your own food.... radical isn't it... but my parents started on an acre when i was little and had an orchard, strawberry patch, chickens, rabbits, bees and a large vegi garden....on good land, 1 acre is plenty.

it isn't so much that we can't grow all we need, but that we can't grow all we want Think about this.. we need fruit and veg, we want strawberries in december...apples and dry fruit got our grandparents through winter.... its about exceptations as much as what we can grow. ....

since we discovered tea will probably grow on our place... the thought of shuttign the gates has leaped a bit closer... because we REALLY REALLY want our caffine. :)

Those of you in the burbs have a read of Noah's Garden: Restoring the Ecology of Our Own Backyards: by Sara B. Stein.. she's amazing...

Tanya
November 8th, 2007, 06:28 PM
hens? a few ducks? and a small milk goat might be OK... call it a pet, keep it quiet and compost the droppings.
a cow produces WAY more milk than a family can use... and butchering a cow... well... probably would REALLY upset suburban neighbors.

medit8ive_spirit
November 8th, 2007, 09:23 PM
I long to have a parcel of land to build a house upon, grow my own fruit, some vegetables, herbs, raise some animals and have some peace away from the city.
We want to be off the grid, utilizing solar, wind, water and geothermal power.
I still wish the government did the true homesteading thing and would give you a small piece of land to start. But then, what am I thinking, all our government does is take! My husband is a veteran and as far as the government is concerned, that doesn't mean a thing. (Sorry about the rant!)

back to the land thing....it's a dream...hopefully not to much longer until it will be a realty........

Philosophia
November 8th, 2007, 09:31 PM
My parents house (where I currently live) is inside a small country town and has its own miniature orchard with apricots, plums, cherries, almonds, apples, mandarins, oranges, etc.. I grow my own vegetable garden with isn't flourishing right now due to water restrictions and the unpredictable weather. We also have meat rabbits and chooks. Someday I'm going to live on my own small farm outside of townships.

We used to have turkeys and ducks but they kept using the concrete as their own personal toilet and chasing us around the backyard.

Tanya
November 8th, 2007, 11:02 PM
philosophia....

You can get around water restrictions with a rainwater tank or by using grey water.

After a shower bucket the water on to your garden.. similarly use water from the rinse cycle of your washing machine.

If you have guttering, getting your rainwater is only a matter of putting a wheelie bin under it... then drag it around dipping out the water.
some info just for SA can be found here:
http://www.watercare.net/water_sa.php

Libris
November 9th, 2007, 10:00 AM
I totally agree, urban/suburban homesteading is going to get much more popular. I think it's a good way to go, save a long commute and 'bloom where you're planted' so to speak. I've been seeing lots of articles in the Mother Earth News etc... dealing with homesteading on less than an acre.

Philosophia, you're parents house sounds lovely. I am so jealous, I wish we could grow some of citrus. We have a miniature orange tree, but it doesn't show signs of fruiting anytime soon LOL

banondraig
November 9th, 2007, 11:43 AM
I long to have a parcel of land to build a house upon, grow my own fruit, some vegetables, herbs, raise some animals and have some peace away from the city.
We want to be off the grid, utilizing solar, wind, water and geothermal power.
I still wish the government did the true homesteading thing and would give you a small piece of land to start. But then, what am I thinking, all our government does is take! My husband is a veteran and as far as the government is concerned, that doesn't mean a thing. (Sorry about the rant!)

back to the land thing....it's a dream...hopefully not to much longer until it will be a realty........

Nebraska was giving away free land a while back. Maybe they are still doing it.

banondraig
November 9th, 2007, 11:48 AM
philosophia....

You can get around water restrictions with a rainwater tank or by using grey water.

After a shower bucket the water on to your garden..


similarly use water from the rinse cycle of your washing machine.

How do you get this to work? mine drains automatically . . .


If you have guttering, getting your rainwater is only a matter of putting a wheelie bin under it... then drag it around dipping out the water.
some info just for SA can be found here:
http://www.watercare.net/water_sa.php


:uhhuhuh:

i wash my dishes by hand, and i save the not-hot-yet water for watering my plants, and let it sit for a day. the plants don't really appreciate the chlorine, so it's helpful for them in that respect, too.

Novembers River
November 9th, 2007, 02:29 PM
You guys are all so inspiring!

My husband and I would love to homestead, but right now we are living in the city (Houston) and getting many things in order. We know we'll be here at least another 10 years.

However our plan is to purchase land while we're still working here in Houston. We have a nice nest egg we're building too. So once we have the land and the nest egg ready we'll be "retiring early" and building a home on our land.

Currently the plan is to have a backyard garden at our new house so we can grow some of our own food even while in the burbs.

banondraig
November 9th, 2007, 02:44 PM
coolness!

it's surprising how much you can grow in a small space if you really want to. i, as an apartment dweller, have grown rosemary, sage, parsley, bay, lavender, thyme, lemon balm, spearmint, sweet woodruff, and a full-sized rosebush on my patio, all at the same time. Also some other plants just for fun.

My next project is going to be figuring out how to set up the old underbed storage "box", of the type with the clear plastic zippered top, as a cold frame. I actually got it from my complex's trash area. You never know what kind of useful stuff people are going to throw out next.

MorningRose
November 13th, 2007, 07:12 PM
My bf and I are only in our 20's but we dream of living out of town on a good piece of land. We've been looking at alternative construction methods as well, as we want something more unique than the cookie-cutter houses that are being built around town right now. I really like cob or straw bale construction, the look is much more natural than the huge box we're in. My grandmother has the small city lot and has managed so much, I want to follow her example and provide more of my own food. I don't like relying on the store as much as I do.

Philosophia
November 13th, 2007, 07:17 PM
philosophia....

You can get around water restrictions with a rainwater tank or by using grey water.

After a shower bucket the water on to your garden.. similarly use water from the rinse cycle of your washing machine.

If you have guttering, getting your rainwater is only a matter of putting a wheelie bin under it... then drag it around dipping out the water.
some info just for SA can be found here:
http://www.watercare.net/water_sa.php

We have a rain water tank but only one unfortunately. I would love to have one that is specific for our garden but its going us a bit more. We use our grey water a lot but it mostly goes to watering the trees and other plants my dad has before I get my hands on it. :(

I would also love to find out if there is any bore water on our property.

banondraig
November 14th, 2007, 11:09 AM
My bf and I are only in our 20's but we dream of living out of town on a good piece of land. We've been looking at alternative construction methods as well, as we want something more unique than the cookie-cutter houses that are being built around town right now. I really like cob or straw bale construction, the look is much more natural than the huge box we're in. My grandmother has the small city lot and has managed so much, I want to follow her example and provide more of my own food. I don't like relying on the store as much as I do.

Make sure you know your plans inside and out, because most localities have strict rules about what kind of house you can and cannot build for yourself. It is possible to convince them to approve an unconventional house if you can show you know what you are doing.

MorningRose
November 14th, 2007, 02:37 PM
Make sure you know your plans inside and out, because most localities have strict rules about what kind of house you can and cannot build for yourself. It is possible to convince them to approve an unconventional house if you can show you know what you are doing.

Oh yes, my uncle had this problem when he wanted to build a stackwall home in his town. They didn't understand it and didn't want to change :goodgrief We're doing lots of research and preparing for an argument. I think we have this thing against doing things the easy way ;D We love our dreams too much to give up without a fight.

banondraig
November 14th, 2007, 04:50 PM
Oh yes, my uncle had this problem when he wanted to build a stackwall home in his town. They didn't understand it and didn't want to change :goodgrief We're doing lots of research and preparing for an argument. I think we have this thing against doing things the easy way ;D We love our dreams too much to give up without a fight.

good for you.

personally i could never build a house in my home county, because they have regulations that a living room must have minimum x square feet, each bedroom must have minimum y square feet, who and how many people may live with you, . . . . ad fascism.

SSanf
November 14th, 2007, 06:01 PM
Does anyone else out there homestead or interested in homesteading, mini-farming etc...?

We have a little farm (about 2 acres), with chickens and a large garden. I like the idea of raising my own food and having a place to worship outside. I think that some homesteading ideals coincide nicely with heathen ideals, so I wouldn't be surprized if there are quite a few pagan homesteaders out there.

So fess up, who likes to homestead? Who out there dreams of having a little farm, raising their own food and filling up a pantry with home canned goods?

:fpoke:I do as much as I can to be self-sufficient. I am in the city but I have many raised garden beds which provide pretty darned well for one old woman by herself. I also have indoor chickens that give me more eggs than I can at.

Tanya
November 14th, 2007, 06:13 PM
Morning Rose,
We are building a passive solar house right now... if you want some pics and a long winded discussion on how we designed it and materials, pm or email, as I can't do either to you with your current set up.

SSanf
November 14th, 2007, 06:37 PM
I found this site.

I love the third picture down that shows how much you can do with raised beds in a small space.

http://pathtofreedom.com/journal/

You can get a great deal out of raised beds or containers in a very small space. Squashes and other vining plants can grow up on trellises if you support the fruit as it gets heavy. There are ways to conserve space.

banondraig
November 14th, 2007, 06:40 PM
Morning Rose,
We are building a passive solar house right now... if you want some pics and a long winded discussion on how we designed it and materials, pm or email, as I can't do either to you with your current set up.


that sounds awesome!


I found this site.

I love the third picture down that shows how much you can do with raised beds in a small space.

http://pathtofreedom.com/journal/

You can get a great deal out of raised beds or containers in a very small space.

i've been to that site before, it's fantastic! thanks for sharing!

SSanf
November 14th, 2007, 06:51 PM
This is Me and my grandaughter showing the corn in JUNE! http://www.mywitchshop.com/Garden_Me_and_Kendra_2007.JPG

I planted it three times and got to harvest it. So, that small space gave me all I need this year.

Of course, the chicken poop helps. LOL!

As you can see from the other boxes, I had already been eating from the garden quite a while in the late spring.

Tanya
November 14th, 2007, 06:53 PM
super pic!

Philosophia
November 14th, 2007, 06:54 PM
I found this site.

I love the third picture down that shows how much you can do with raised beds in a small space.

http://pathtofreedom.com/journal/

You can get a great deal out of raised beds or containers in a very small space. Squashes and other vining plants can grow up on trellises if you support the fruit as it gets heavy. There are ways to conserve space.

Ooh, I love this site. Thank you so much for sharing! :hugz:

SSanf
November 14th, 2007, 06:57 PM
Since you like that, some credit must be given where some credit is due.

Behold my familiar.

http://www.mywitchshop.com/Garden_Turner_the%20Cat_in_the_Corn.JPG

banondraig
November 14th, 2007, 07:00 PM
what a beautiful kitty!

i love black cats, they're somehow so much more cat-like than other colors.

SSanf
November 14th, 2007, 07:02 PM
Yes, I love him so much. The garden on this small personal island hidden in the midst of the city is his domain.

Do remember that I have lost 15 pounds! LOL! The garden is good to me.

So, let's do it. I am up for a homesteading group. What works in the city will work in the country as well. What works in the country may be adaptable to the city.

We can be a mutual support, bragging and back patting group. Could be fun and also make us all feel more empowered.

Philosophia
November 14th, 2007, 07:05 PM
Since you like that, some credit must be given where some credit is due.

Behold my familiar.

http://www.mywitchshop.com/Garden_Turner_the%20Cat_in_the_Corn.JPG

He's gorgeous! Oh, I love cats. :hugz: I have a black cat as well.

darkchild
November 15th, 2007, 12:39 AM
We are homesteading.
We are livng on the acreage that we plan to live on for the rest of our lives.
It has taken four years, but we have finally put a roof on the home that we are building on a 45 acre agricultural farm.
It was actually homesteaded by my SO's Great-Grandfather, but we have made it our own. I would not trade this experience for anything in the world.
We farm, we live and we honor the land as it was meant to be.

P.S. - I have a black cat as well, what does this mean? LOL

banondraig
November 15th, 2007, 01:24 AM
We are homesteading.
We are livng on the acreage that we plan to live on for the rest of our lives.
It has taken four years, but we have finally put a roof on the home that we are building on a 45 acre agricultural farm.
It was actually homesteaded by my SO's Great-Grandfather, but we have made it our own. I would not trade this experience for anything in the world.
We farm, we live and we honor the land as it was meant to be.

P.S. - I have a black cat as well, what does this mean? LOL

that is awesome!

my cat is gray.

Bronach Druid
November 15th, 2007, 01:38 AM
Growing up I guess you could say my parents where "homesteaders". We always had a big garden, that provided much of our food, made our own tomato sauce, pickles, various relishes, canned peaches, etc. I would love to start doing all of that myself as well, not sure about raising the critters though......I tend to get very attached to any animals I am around, I don't think I could make them into my supper!

TheWomanMonster
November 15th, 2007, 01:42 AM
I've always wanted to...

But apartment dweller me the closest I can get is my kitchen herb garden plan and balcony garden.
For now...

Eldawyn
November 15th, 2007, 01:53 AM
It sounds so good. I'd LOVE to even just have a garden. And eat from it.

But I have a horrible, shameful problem. This little pagan has a BROWN thumb. I cannot keep plants alive. I just don't know what it is, but I never have been able to. Pets, I can do, but green stuff? Dies.

I try to get my mom to do more vegetables and herbs. She has the room and the skill, but we live in a semi-arid desert so some things are harder to grow.

darkchild
November 16th, 2007, 01:24 AM
that is awesome!

my cat is gray.

That's so funny, I have a gray cat as well. He is the brother of the black cat.

I got them from the Humane Society, I just couldn't seperate them by taking only one of them. :)

Libris
November 16th, 2007, 10:01 AM
So, let's do it. I am up for a homesteading group. What works in the city will work in the country as well. What works in the country may be adaptable to the city.

We can be a mutual support, bragging and back patting group. Could be fun and also make us all feel more empowered.

A group would be so great. Actually, that's kind of one of the reasons I started this thread. I wanted to know how many people out in MW are homesteaders and are interested in homesteading and if there were a homesteading sub-forum if they would participate. I keep wanting to post things in the survival forum, but they're really more related to homesteading than survival. I'm not sure where to post homesteading related things, pagan spaces, the green witchcraft path forum?

I wonder if it would be possible to get a sub-forum for homesteading if there are enough people interested?

Maybe I should start a thread to how many other people would be interested

SSanf
November 16th, 2007, 10:08 AM
A group would be so great. Actually, that's kind of one of the reasons I started this thread. I wanted to know how many people out in MW are homesteaders and are interested in homesteading and if there were a homesteading sub-forum if they would participate. I keep wanting to post things in the survival forum, but they're really more related to homesteading than survival. I'm not sure where to post homesteading related things, pagan spaces, the green witchcraft path forum?

I wonder if it would be possible to get a sub-forum for homesteading if there are enough people interested?

Maybe I should start a thread to how many other people would be interestedSurvival and homesteading kind of go hand in glove to me. But, the difference is one is emergency preparedness for an under the gun situation and the other is a life style choice.

I think a big issue in a homesteading thread would be to help those who want to but who are forced to live in the city find ways and means to do as much as they are able even living in an apartment.

They can do little things that add up such as encouraging the right "weeds" to grow where weeds grow, anyway, near them. There are always spots here and there that don't get mowed. These can be bountyful little hidden gardens.

Anyway, that is just one way a person can homestead in the city. I think we can put our heads together and give them ideas.

Libris
November 16th, 2007, 10:13 AM
True, true! One of the reasons I homestead is for emergency preparedness. I think a lot of people with the homesteading mindset homestead for this reason. But I'm worried about getting off topic in the emergency prep forum. I wonder, do you think we might be able to expand the subject of that forum to include homesteading since they kind of go hand in hand?

I started a thread in the site room on the subject:
http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?p=3329431#post3329431

banondraig
November 16th, 2007, 12:25 PM
True, true! One of the reasons I homestead is for emergency preparedness. I think a lot of people with the homesteading mindset homestead for this reason. But I'm worried about getting off topic in the emergency prep forum. I wonder, do you think we might be able to expand the subject of that forum to include homesteading since they kind of go hand in hand?

I started a thread in the site room on the subject:
http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?p=3329431#post3329431

makes sense to me, i think of homesteading as long-term emergency preparedness.

Shanti
November 17th, 2007, 07:17 PM
Little house on the prairie here, except we have electricity and the pc and the toilet is actually inside. LOL :)
We homestead.
Land on the river.
We do things the old ways, manual.
Hauling water 3 times a day in winter to 4 different winter pens.
My mates works for a farmer near by cutting and bailing hay so we have all the free hay we need for our animals.

We raise animals for food. Goats, sheep and rabbits.
We have chickens and Muscovy ducks and this spring turkeys will be added.

We haven't raised much by way of vegetables since we got hit by a record flood this summer and our gardens got wiped out. But that's life. Lucky its was a 100yr plus record flood. We were actually very lucky, quite a few farms here got wiped out and lost everything including their animals.

We live in a dump that's was built in pieces out of scraps, a dog patch house.
We heat with wood in an old box stove.

Its a little backwards by today's standards.
River living is a little different than prairie life.

But it works. We got food and necessities and we wouldn't trade it for anything. :)

alwaysfallingup
November 17th, 2007, 08:49 PM
We raise animals for food. Goats, sheep and rabbits.
We have chickens and Muscovy dicks and this spring turkeys will be added.



Muscovy...DUCKS, maybe? :gagged:

banondraig
November 18th, 2007, 12:16 AM
Muscovy...DUCKS, maybe? :gagged:

:lol: i noticed that, too.

Shanti
November 18th, 2007, 02:08 AM
Muscovy...DUCKS, maybe? :gagged:
opps. Major blush going on here.
Good thing I had a post in my Animism class or lord knows how long it may have been before I came back and got this little booboo fixed.
My, thats was so bad.

Um, yes, ducks. They're ducks. LMAO

~slinks out red faced to go post in animism class.~

Cindlady2
November 18th, 2007, 06:04 AM
LMAO!!!!! It took me a little longer because she fixed it by the time I got here! lol

If it were not for the health issues, I would do it in a heart beat!
Came close when I was first married, but we were renting and got the chance to buy our own house so we took it. I do miss our little piece of the farm, but getting the house seemed like a better idea at the time. I've always had homestead "habits" and a homestead heart! :)

alwaysfallingup
November 18th, 2007, 03:46 PM
opps. Major blush going on here.
Good thing I had a post in my Animism class or lord knows how long it may have been before I came back and got this little booboo fixed.
My, thats was so bad.

Um, yes, ducks. They're ducks. LMAO

~slinks out red faced to go post in animism class.~

You can imagine the kind of mental image I had...:weirdsmil

Novembers River
November 18th, 2007, 04:48 PM
I wonder if it would be possible to get a sub-forum for homesteading if there are enough people interested?

Maybe I should start a thread to how many other people would be interested

I think a homesteading/simple living sub-forum would be great!

Tanya
November 18th, 2007, 05:29 PM
Hey Shanti,
You are up on us.. we live in a shed and the toilet and shower are outside! That's nice in the summer... I have many philosophical pees... but in the winter... while its not Wisconsin cold... its well below freezing..... and showering is taking your life into your hands.

BTW... can you or SSanf give me any tips on how to PLUCK A DUCK.... I did one a few weeks back like a chicken in a hot pot of water... and .... HE DIDN'T fit into even my canning pot.... and it took me about 3 hours....... I was too exhausted to eat him after I got the bugger clean...

further... I know he was so diffuclt because of all his down.... how do you save the down? It was beautiful stuff,., but after dipping (parts of him) him it hot water repeatedly,.. it was all pretty wet and hard to control.. and I assumed it would go moldy if I bagged it wet, and blow away if I let it sit out to dry... so this time it unfurnunately went into the compost.

Shanti
November 18th, 2007, 06:00 PM
Hey Shanti,
You are up on us.. we live in a shed and the toilet and shower are outside! That's nice in the summer... I have many philosophical pees... but in the winter... while its not Wisconsin cold... its well below freezing..... and showering is taking your life into your hands.

BTW... can you or SSanf give me any tips on how to PLUCK A DUCK.... I did one a few weeks back like a chicken in a hot pot of water... and .... HE DIDN'T fit into even my canning pot.... and it took me about 3 hours....... I was too exhausted to eat him after I got the bugger clean...

further... I know he was so diffuclt because of all his down.... how do you save the down? It was beautiful stuff,., but after dipping (parts of him) him it hot water repeatedly,.. it was all pretty wet and hard to control.. and I assumed it would go moldy if I bagged it wet, and blow away if I let it sit out to dry... so this time it unfurnunately went into the compost.
Hehehe sounds like they way I grew up!
My parents had a one room cabin. No plumbing, no electric and an outhouse. :)
And that was northern Wisconsin. :)

I cheat when it comes to plucking.
I kill and then pull the feathers that will come off easily. Down usually comes off fairly easy. I dont bother to soak cause after I get as many easy feathers as I can, I skin all my birds! :)
We use the meat in stir fry's and casseroles and roasted in sauces or covered in bacon. :) No need to keep the skin on for us.

Then I take the skin and toss some borax on the flesh side and as it dries I work more feathers off. Any that just wont give, I cut off. :)

Tanya
November 18th, 2007, 06:52 PM
how do you keep the down?

btw... since you're a spinner.... is it worth keeping the brushings from my angora rabbit.. do think a spinner would want it?

Shanti
November 18th, 2007, 08:22 PM
how do you keep the down?

btw... since you're a spinner.... is it worth keeping the brushings from my angora rabbit.. do think a spinner would want it?
I just keep them in a plastic bin with a lid.
I dont get them wet so they stay fine in plastic bins.

Ok the angora rabbit, "is it worth keeping the brushings"....:foh:
Um, yes!!!! Thats stuffs gold.
As long as its over 1 1/2 inches long its spinnable and sellable.
The longer the fiber the more its worth.
Gosh do an e-bay search for Angora fiber in the spinning section. Its expensive.
And brushed or plucked fiber is worth more than cut.
Most spinners dont want cut.
And your in Australia? They are regulated to heck in rabbit keeping from what I heard.
I imagine with all the regulations for rabbit ownership that fiber may be worth even more there than it is here.

Tanya
November 18th, 2007, 09:34 PM
well thats good news! I don't come from a spinning family....

Maybe my mother in law can spin it... then my daugher can have a grey fuzzy scarf from her grey fuzzy friend.

Cindlady2
November 19th, 2007, 02:29 AM
I would think that would be a keepsake of a lifetime! :)

haw_thrn
November 19th, 2007, 11:52 PM
id love to have a homestead. thats what i'm working towards right now. (one skill at a time) barring that i'm getting a cabin in the bush ( deep bush seeing as i already live in the country) and living off the land as much as posssible. ( ironic seeing as i used to be a vegitarian).. I don't even think it'll be all that big of a stretch for me anyways seeing as i'm pretty much a hermit as it is .
now, how does a hermit male meet a hermit female? Hmmm.

Tanya
November 20th, 2007, 12:20 AM
the internet... that's how I met mine :)

It sure beats peeing on trees and hoping the 'signal' gets out there.

Libris
November 20th, 2007, 09:08 AM
See, I was JUST thinking about whether it would be worth the extra brushing and upkeep to get angora rabbits. I'd love to do fiber work, but I don't have a place ready for a goat. So I thought- hmmm rabbit?

You guys are helpful without even knowing it :lol:

I love this thread, I love reading about everybody's dreams, what they've got going, what they're going to do. It makes me less angry at this place for sucking down 4K the first year, because I can see what a great place it's going to be and how the land will feed my family.

My husband and I just burned off a section of the overgrown oak savanna in the back (a very small section). I know next year we'll see an increase in the native sedges and maybe some of the savanna wild flowers will return.

banondraig
November 20th, 2007, 01:35 PM
id love to have a homestead. thats what i'm working towards right now. (one skill at a time) barring that i'm getting a cabin in the bush ( deep bush seeing as i already live in the country) and living off the land as much as posssible. ( ironic seeing as i used to be a vegitarian).. I don't even think it'll be all that big of a stretch for me anyways seeing as i'm pretty much a hermit as it is .
now, how does a hermit male meet a hermit female? Hmmm.

i'm a hermit female. :wave:


the internet... that's how I met mine :)

It sure beats peeing on trees and hoping the 'signal' gets out there.

:rollingla

Juniper138
November 20th, 2007, 08:11 PM
I have a nice sized acreage where we board horses and raise dogs. My family has been showing and breeding dogs for decades. My mom and I bought the property and split it up between us, we were lucky to find a small farm with two houses. We grow a fair bit of our own food, lots of herbs, and many flowers. We have been considering adding a few sheep to the mix this summer. We also would like to get off grid in the next few years.

Diotima
January 29th, 2008, 05:57 AM
Does 0.6 acres count, if there are some 80 fruit trees growing on it?:hahugh: Plus a veggie patch, berry bushes and lots of dreams of adding some chickens.

I and DH love our tiny orchard like crazy. We moved in here in summer 2006, and still feel that we are still beginners in many ways.
We love simple lifestyle: grow our food, heat our home with wood as far as possible. I cook on woodstove and craft. I also dress plainly (I don't know any other Pagans who do that, but I still think it's one of my better ideas) We are interesting to make our little patch of land besides a productive garden, also a haven for local fauna like birds and butterflies.

I'm a Pantheist and feel that simple lifestyle matches my faith 100%. It's nice to see so many fellow Pagans here.