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View Full Version : We're more Amish than the local Amish!



Shanti
January 27th, 2008, 05:16 PM
I have been watching the Amish around here over the last year. Its hard not to, we are in an Amish area.

I noticed things.

They use a bobcat to move snow and hay.
We use a shovel and a pitchfork.

They use a gas weed whacker to get the weeds around their houses.
I move the goats around the house to get the weeds.

They use riding lawn mowers for lawns.
We use goats and sheep.

They feed their animals in store bought metal hay feeders.
My mate tosses feeders together out of scrap wood.

They heat with propane.
We use wood.

They dont have cloths hanging to dry outside in summer.
We do.

They cut and bail hay with machinery.
We cut with a cycle and pile the hay be hand.

Darn, we're more Amish than the local Amish!!! :rotfl:

Juniper138
January 27th, 2008, 06:10 PM
lol
Thats great!!!

alwaysfallingup
January 27th, 2008, 06:10 PM
Are they actually Amish, or are they Mennonites? My parents live in the middle of a large Amish community, and their neighbors don't use any kind of powered machinery at all. In fact, when they moved in, they asked my Dad if he would use his bushhog to clear the Russian olives from their field so they could put their horses and cattle in because the olives were so thick there was not room for them! The local Mennonites, on the other hand, drive and use some machinery in their farming practices. Maybe it varies from community to community, too. Is there such a thing as a liberal Amish family? Hmm.

I hope that at some point, I get to rely mostly on people-power, but I have to admit... I'm not going to be above asking my Dad to come plow for me with the tractor, or having Preston mow with the lawnmower. I guess I'm just not quite ready to go completely back to the old ways!:T

Halstrom
January 27th, 2008, 06:54 PM
Yeah, I was thinking the same thing as alwaysfallingup. Are you sure that they are Amish, and not Mennonite? Because I know that the Amish are absolutely forbidden from using modern technology.

Shanti
January 27th, 2008, 08:10 PM
LOL, Yes they are Amish.
We have done business with them because they have a saw mill and a scratch and dent grocery store.

They have modernized just in the last few years.

I just found humor in us being more Amish than the Amish when it comes to doing things all by hand.

Lunacie
January 27th, 2008, 08:10 PM
I lived around both Amish and Mennonite for most of my adult life, and you're describing Mennonites. They come from the same root stock, but at some point the Mennonites decided to allow some "modern" things. And to make it more confusing, there are different sects of Mennonite, some more strict and some less strict. There are a few other Old Orders like the Dunkers scattered around the country as well.


Edited after reading Shanti's last post. If they say they're Amish, then it's a new sect that I've never heard about.

Shanti
January 27th, 2008, 08:21 PM
Hey they just are people that are finding it hard to make a living in an area that has large competition.

They need money too ya know.

They can either modernize or stop farming, which is how they make their money.

They dont just farm for themselves. They have needs for cash these days.

They are not as large as they once were here.
They have to depend more and more for outside purchasing of goods.

I know a lot of Amish are finding themselves with the same dilemmas.

Times are changing for even the Amish.

Lunacie
January 27th, 2008, 08:26 PM
Just saying it's not a change I've seen. Maybe because it's not happening in Kansas, or maybe it's really recent (I moved to the city about 5 years ago).

banondraig
January 27th, 2008, 10:45 PM
I have been watching the Amish around here over the last year. Its hard not to, we are in an Amish area.

I noticed things.

They use a bobcat to move snow and hay.
We use a shovel and a pitchfork.

They use a gas weed whacker to get the weeds around their houses.
I move the goats around the house to get the weeds.

They use riding lawn mowers for lawns.
We use goats and sheep.

They feed their animals in store bought metal hay feeders.
My mate tosses feeders together out of scrap wood.

They heat with propane.
We use wood.

They dont have cloths hanging to dry outside in summer.
We do.

They cut and bail hay with machinery.
We cut with a cycle and pile the hay be hand.

Darn, we're more Amish than the local Amish!!! :rotfl:

:lol:

That's awesome!

I'm reminded of a cartoon I saw back in 1999. There was an Amish farmer, and he was wearing a T-shirt captioned "Y2K Ready".

Autumn
January 28th, 2008, 11:59 AM
In western NY in the 70's and 80's the Amish used engines mounted on carts that were horse drawn, so I can see using a weed wacker, an old fashioned push mower (has a 4 stroke running the blade but you push it) Or a DR Trimmer, because all require some serious physical exertion.

I may be off base here but if these folks wanted to make serious money they should register a trademark and take advantage of the brand, after all everyone equates Amish with doing things the old fashioned way and with pure ingredients... seems a better way to survive than letting go of long held principles. I could be talking through my hat here, if so feel free to ignore me.

Lunacie
January 28th, 2008, 12:25 PM
In western NY in the 70's and 80's the Amish used engines mounted on carts that were horse drawn, so I can see using a weed wacker, an old fashioned push mower (has a 4 stroke running the blade but you push it) Or a DR Trimmer, because all require some serious physical exertion.

I may be off base here but if these folks wanted to make serious money they should register a trademark and take advantage of the brand, after all everyone equates Amish with doing things the old fashioned way and with pure ingredients... seems a better way to survive than letting go of long held principles. I could be talking through my hat here, if so feel free to ignore me.

It's really not about being "old fashioned." This page explains it all pretty well I think.




The most important factor of Amish life is Gelassenheit, or submission to the will of God. Gelassenheit is based primarily on Jesus' words, "not my will but thine be done."16 By giving up individuality and any thought of selfishness, they embrace God's will by serving others and submitting to Him.



The Amish feel that Gelassenheit should permeate every facet of their existence, and even be apparent in their material possessions. Consequently, they will only selectively use modern technologies. As seen in the symbols of Gelassenheit, the Amish believe that using lanterns and the buggies typifies their lifestyle of simplicity and modesty.

Any technology that does not uphold the Gelassenheit principles is banned from use. Electricity is seen as a connection with the outside world and violates the Amish principle of separation from society. Electricity also promotes the use of household items, such as the television, that allow the outside, "English," values of sloth, luxury, and vanity to infiltrate the household.

Automobiles are not often used because they degrade the Gelassenheit principle of a small, close-knit community. The Amish fear, with good reason, that these modern transportation technologies will cause them to spread apart, much like most modern American families. Also, the Amish fear that the automobile will promote competition among themselves. They worry that the car will become a status symbol and promote vanity, which is in direct violation of the Gelassenheit value of modesty.

The telephone is banned from the household because, much like the automobile, it promotes a separation of community. Instead of taking a carriage or walking to a friend's house, the Amish feel that they would be tempted to simply stay home and speak on the phone. In order to uphold Gelassenheit, many modern technologies have been banned from regular use.

quoted in part from: http://www.shawcreekgeneralstore.com/amish_article1.htm

banondraig
January 28th, 2008, 07:12 PM
It's really not about being "old fashioned." This page explains it all pretty well I think.

[SIZE=3]
quoted in part from: http://www.shawcreekgeneralstore.com/amish_article1.htm

Ah. So in a nutshell, farm machinery is OK because it lets you survive financially, and spend more time with your family, but cars, electricity, and phones are not OK because they might make you a lazy show-off who is detached from your community.

Or am I off-base?

Lunacie
January 28th, 2008, 08:06 PM
Well... that does seem to basically what the author of the article is saying.

Halstrom
January 28th, 2008, 08:06 PM
Ah. So in a nutshell, farm machinery is OK because it lets you survive financially, and spend more time with your family, but cars, electricity, and phones are not OK because they might make you a lazy show-off who is detached from your community.

Or am I off-base?

That's what the article seems to say.

Lunacie
January 28th, 2008, 08:54 PM
So as you can see, there's a lot more to being Amish than simply not using electricity. Kinda like saying that a Christian who appreciates the changing seasons and honors more than one god (Jehovah and Mary and Jesus), and believes in reincarnation and recycles and cares about the planet... is more Pagan than some Pagans.

It's okay Shanti, I did get your joke, just in a foul mood because of a meeting at school this afternoon.

Shanti
January 29th, 2008, 02:58 AM
So as you can see, there's a lot more to being Amish than simply not using electricity. Kinda like saying that a Christian who appreciates the changing seasons and honors more than one god (Jehovah and Mary and Jesus), and believes in reincarnation and recycles and cares about the planet... is more Pagan than some Pagans.

It's okay Shanti, I did get your joke, just in a foul mood because of a meeting at school this afternoon.
Thanks Lunacie.
Its was just a little light humor I was trying to share.
I said this to my mate when driving home one day, we are more Amish than the Amish, as we watched them on their bobcat as we passed by.
It was funny then. ~shrugs~

Aidron
January 29th, 2008, 04:17 AM
Do your Amish neighbors have access to a computer and the internet though?

forestrangergrrl
February 10th, 2008, 06:56 PM
there's also another explanation... there are basically 2 'types' of amish - the church amish and the house amish. one group allows the use of more modern things like cars and machinery the other doesn't. the one isn't more or less amish than the other and unless you see them on a tractor or whatever you can't tell just by looking at them. they still dress the same (although i think they do allow more color in their clothing if memory serves me right...) and they act and sound pretty much the same. i don't know if they still have that seperation or not, but from what shanti has described it sounds like she and her family lives close to the group that allows more modern 'conveniences' to be used. unfortunately i can't remember which group is which, grrr... lol
anyway, just my .02 cents...
and yeah, that's funny that you're more amish than the amish! lol!

alwaysfallingup
February 10th, 2008, 07:13 PM
My Mom would totally love to convert if there was a process. I think she's really in love with her Amish neighbors. But my Dad keeps telling her things like, "The Amish don't get to sit in their recliner and watch the game on their days off. Who would want to be Amish?" :lol:

Lunacie
February 10th, 2008, 08:05 PM
there's also another explanation... there are basically 2 'types' of amish - the church amish and the house amish. one group allows the use of more modern things like cars and machinery the other doesn't. the one isn't more or less amish than the other and unless you see them on a tractor or whatever you can't tell just by looking at them. they still dress the same (although i think they do allow more color in their clothing if memory serves me right...) and they act and sound pretty much the same. i don't know if they still have that seperation or not, but from what shanti has described it sounds like she and her family lives close to the group that allows more modern 'conveniences' to be used. unfortunately i can't remember which group is which, grrr... lol
anyway, just my .02 cents...
and yeah, that's funny that you're more amish than the amish! lol!

We talked about that earlier. As far as I know the "church Amish" are called Mennonite.


edited:
Just did a google for "church Amish" and found this... http://www.horseshoe.cc/pennadutch/religion/amish/amishkle.htm
Apparently we don't have any "church Amish in this part of the country. I have learned something new.

forestrangergrrl
February 10th, 2008, 09:29 PM
yes, i read thru the whole thread and saw that the connection to the mennonites was made, but they aren't mennonites. the mennonites have much more freedom of dress and use many more modern conveniences. the women basically just have to wear dresses (or skirts) and the little bonnets and the men usually can't really be told from your basic farmer, whereas the amish (no matter which ones) have a very strict dress code w/ very few colors and you can definately tell them from everyone else.
i'm glad you found that article as it goes into how they first started and the basic differences. i tried reading it all but started to get a headache from the color of the screen... lol!
in any case, usually mennonites and amish are easy to tell apart provided you know the differences and both make marvelous food! yum!
there's an amish 'general' store about a 1/2 hour east of cincy that used to be on the way to my college and it was a stop that was always made to get breads, cheeses, meats, candies, etc. they also sell sheds, furniture, gazebos and whatnot. it's an awesome place and i miss being able to go to it several times a year.

Lunacie
February 11th, 2008, 10:18 AM
The article said that "church Amish" can wear colors, which is certainly not my experience with the Amish in this state. The women here wear black dresses, white prayer caps, black bonnets, and black shawls or capes. The men wear black pants and white shirts, a black felt hat in winter and a straw hat in summer. Unmarried men don't have beards. They drive a horse and buggy, and use horse-drawn farming equipment.

Around here only a couple of Mennonite sects still have women wearing the prayer cap. They wear plain dresses, but in various colors. The men don't dress quite as plain, I've seen them wearing plaid shirts and "gimme caps". And the married men don't have to wear beards. The old-order Mennonites don't drive cars but they do drive tractors, so we often see them driving to town on their tractors, sometimes with a covered box wagon behind for the family and the groceries. The rest drive newer cars and minivans, and act like they never took driver's ed and "God will protect them" no matter how badly they drive. Gah.

Diotima
February 11th, 2008, 04:58 PM
I did some research on the dress of various "plain" sects before I started dressing plainly myself (obviously, my reasons have nothing to do with Bible and anyone knowledgeable about plain people would not confuse me with Amish).

As far as I know, little can be said about Amish dress in general. They are divided in small church districts, and each district has its own "Ordnung", or code of conduct that among many other things regulates dress. Most Amish I know of wear solid colors rather than patterned fabrics, have their women wear some sort of headcovering (usually but not always a little bonnet), have married men wear beards but not usually mustache, and suspenders instead of belt.

Mennonites are even more difficult to categorize: there are Old Order Mennonites who are not that different from Amish -most would allow patterned fabric in women's dresses but that's it, while many Mennonites dress in mainstream style. In general, Old Order Mennonites are a little less conservative than Amish, though probably some of them are more conservative than some "church Amish" eg. Beachy Amish. It is very confusing to say the least!

Besides Amish and Mennonites, few Quakers, Hutterites, Old Order Brethren and even some conservative Baptists dress plainly. It is sometimes difficult to tell different groups apart- the differences can be very small and not easily recognizeable for an outsider, like whether or not zippers or buttons are allowed, whether men wear belt or suspenders etc.

PrincessKLS
February 12th, 2008, 02:42 PM
I went to the Amish country in Lancaster PA over the summer, I was shocked to learn that yeah some used cars and lawn mowers. When I was in Philadelphia over the same vacation I did noticed this one Amish girl walking about the street with her bonnet a bit loose, and a pattern floral dress that looked Amish from the knees up. Her dress was about knee or calf level and she wore sandals.

They even used washers and dryers but they used a special wind generator or something taht did not require electricity.