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View Full Version : Which Democrat Candidate does the G.O.P. want to be nominated?



Laisrean
January 31st, 2008, 03:11 PM
Now that the struggle is between Hillary and Obama, which of the two do you think the G.O.P. will be hoping is nominated? What I mean here is, which of the two will be the least likely to win a general election against the traditional elderly white male candidate the G.O.P. puts up? Like it or not, there is a great deal of racism and/or sexism still present in the USA and this will work to the Republicans' advantage, because many people simply won't vote for a minority and/or female for president.

In addition, there is also a lot of bad stuff associated with the Clinton name, and Obama is said to lack experience and so on. So this also factors into things. Now that all the other major democrats are out, the choice comes down to a woman with a lot of bad baggage attached from her husband, and a black man who is said to lack experience. So which of these two will the G.O.P. be more likely to win when up against?

Edit: Another problem with Hillary would be the fact she voted for the war and all that other crap like the Patriot act. On the other hand, I don't think Obama is really a pro-peace candidate either, but AFAIK he hasn't actually voted for the invasion. Correct me if I'm wrong.

banondraig
January 31st, 2008, 05:54 PM
Hillary. There is practically an entire industry devoted to hating her, which has been in place for over fifteen years now.

Brightshores
January 31st, 2008, 07:46 PM
I agree. Nothing galvanizes a bunch of fractious Republicans like a Clinton.

Wicce
February 1st, 2008, 02:24 AM
Hillary Rodham Clinton, I'd say...it's a talking point, but I agree with it, she unites the republicans, not the democrats.

There is nothing I want less then to have the election come down to one state for the electoral tiebreaker for the THIRD election in a row. I don't believe our country can take it. I'm sick of an America with blue on each coast and a wide swath of red states in between, and an eyepatch of blue Great Lakes states, with it coming down to Florida or Ohio to be the decider. Hillary can't win the swing states we need.

matella18
February 1st, 2008, 04:32 AM
I agree that the Republicans would love to have Hillary win the democratic nomination. I just spoke with someone the other day who made it clear that they would not vote for Hillary because she is a woman. This person also said that they wouldn't vote for Barack either because he is black. This kind of thinking is so prevalent where I live that I really get frustrated and want to pull my hair out.

BlueSage
February 1st, 2008, 10:04 AM
Now that the struggle is between Hillary and Obama, which of the two do you think the G.O.P. will be hoping is nominated? What I mean here is, which of the two will be the least likely to win a general election against the traditional elderly white male candidate the G.O.P. puts up? Like it or not, there is a great deal of racism and/or sexism still present in the USA and this will work to the Republicans' advantage, because many people simply won't vote for a minority and/or female for president.



Something I've wanted to point out for a while. Remember back in the day when the news companies said we will have either a woman or minority leader as president? Remember that? That "or" statement more then likely cost one of the 2 (if not both) of them their chances at winning the election since that "or" statement already divided the two and people made a descision instead of on party lines rather "a woman or a colored man."

just my 2 cents.

BlueSage
February 1st, 2008, 10:05 AM
oh, and yes i do think there will be another republican president. (i'm independent)

David19
February 1st, 2008, 07:49 PM
This may be quite OT, but can I just ask, what exactly is G.O.P., I've seen loads of people mention that before in this forum, but don't know what exactly it means.

Brightshores
February 1st, 2008, 07:51 PM
It means "Grand Old Party" and is a term for the Republican party. Basically - the Republican party as it is now was founded earlier than the Democratic party was.

Laisrean
February 1st, 2008, 08:02 PM
It means "Grand Old Party" and is a term for the Republican party. Basically - the Republican party as it is now was founded earlier than the Democratic party was.

Yep. Abraham Lincoln was the first Republican president the U.S. ever had. Before him, we had some weird parties like the Whigs and the No-nothings which no longer exist today. Back then the Republican party was considered a third party, but it won and it replaced those others.

I'm not really sure what the story is behind the Democratic party, but I think Andrew Jackson was an early example of a Democrat... Interestingly, George Washington (the first president) wasn't a member of any party at all. He warned that political parties weren't a good idea, but no one listened to him.

Brightshores
February 1st, 2008, 08:15 PM
Yep. Abraham Lincoln was the first Republican president the U.S. ever had. Before him, we had some weird parties like the Whigs and the No-nothings which no longer exist today. Back then the Republican party was considered a third party, but it won and it replaced those others.

I'm not really sure what the story is behind the Democratic party, but I think Andrew Jackson was an early example of a Democrat...
Actually, the Democrats were around from early on - Thomas Jefferson was (confusingly) a Democratic-Republican; but you're absolutely right, Andrew Jackson was a Democrat. The reason the Republicans get to call themselves the "GOP" is that the Democratic party fractured itself like crazy and ended up being nothing like it is now in the years before the Civil War, leading to a Republican ascendancy that really controlled the country for a very long time, starting with Lincoln and ending with Hoover in the 1930s.

BTW - I always thought that the "Know-Nothings" were a great political party. If all of our politicians admitted how little they really know, we'd all be in a lot better shape. :lol:

Interestingly, George Washington (the first president) wasn't a member of any party at all. He warned that political parties weren't a good idea, but no one listened to him.
QFT. If you read the Federalist Papers, you'll see how very much political parties were hated by most of the Founding Fathers. They detested what they called "factionalism" and felt it would tear the country apart.

David19
February 1st, 2008, 10:07 PM
It means "Grand Old Party" and is a term for the Republican party. Basically - the Republican party as it is now was founded earlier than the Democratic party was.

Thanks for that, I didn't know.



Yep. Abraham Lincoln was the first Republican president the U.S. ever had. Before him, we had some weird parties like the Whigs and the No-nothings which no longer exist today. Back then the Republican party was considered a third party, but it won and it replaced those others.

I'm not really sure what the story is behind the Democratic party, but I think Andrew Jackson was an early example of a Democrat... Interestingly, George Washington (the first president) wasn't a member of any party at all. He warned that political parties weren't a good idea, but no one listened to him.

That's quite interesting.

banondraig
February 2nd, 2008, 12:34 PM
Yep. Abraham Lincoln was the first Republican president the U.S. ever had. Before him, we had some weird parties like the Whigs and the No-nothings which no longer exist today. Back then the Republican party was considered a third party, but it won and it replaced those others.



Dude, it's the "Know-Nothings". They got the nickname because they refused to talk about what went on at their party gathering, saying, "I know nothing."

Laisrean
February 2nd, 2008, 01:06 PM
Dude, it's the "Know-Nothings". They got the nickname because they refused to talk about what went on at their party gathering, saying, "I know nothing."

So their party chairman was Sgt. Schultz? :hahugh: