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Agaliha
March 3rd, 2008, 11:32 PM
Some resources on Ostara and Spring Equinox symbolism, traditions, lore and whatnot. Feel free to add more links and discuss!

**

(note: if you click on a link and it says: "This link is not authorized by Yahoo! If you would like to continue to this link's intended destination at your own risk, click here."
The link isn't broken. Instead of typing the URL directly, I copied the link from Yahoo's search, which gets old over time.)

The Spring Equinox is associated with, or known as: Alban Eilir, Eostar, Eostre, Feast of Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Festival of Trees, Lady Day, NawRuz, No Ruz, Ostara, Ostra, Rites of Spring, and the Vernal Equinox.

Spring Equinox


Celebrating Spring Equinox - School of the Seasons (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiljvcxH7sYAVGVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhNzhxdjVzBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=121idui7l/EXP=1204686563/**http%3a//www.schooloftheseasons.com/spring.html)
Spring (season) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiljvcxH7sYAWGVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhamdwMGpqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=12017nk9l/EXP=1204686563/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_%28season%29)
Spring Equinox celebrations of Christianity, Judaism, Neopaganism, etc (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiljvcxH7sYAWmVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhNGQ4c21qBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=128iv373n/EXP=1204686563/**http%3a//www.religioustolerance.org/spring_equinox.htm)
Spring Equinox: Facts and Misinformation (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB4nJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFidHZuc3FlBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTEEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=11pan8lba/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//www.tylwythteg.com/Spring.html)
Free Spring Equinox Ecards, Spring Equinox Greeting Cards, Happy Spring (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB5nJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFidmtiZG02BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTMEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=126pias3m/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//www.123greetings.com/events/spring_equinox/)
BBC - Religion & Ethics - Spring Equinox (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB7HJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFiMnZpYmx2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTYEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=131uqn9tq/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/paganism/holydays/springequinox.shtml)
Is Easter a Christian or Pagan Holiday? Unpacking the Pagan Elements (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB9HJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFiOHFoZzh0BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMjAEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=12oi25mv9/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//atheism.about.com/od/easterholidayseason/p/PaganChristian.htm)

Ostara


Ostara - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkmhrvsxHh7oAXR1XNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhaHBlYTduBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11n7fchi9/EXP=1204686827/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostara)
History of Ostara (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkliSvsxH0icAwiJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFiajRtZ2V0BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTIEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=12v30p1ik/EXP=1204686866/**http%3a//paganwiccan.about.com/od/ostarathespringequinox/p/Ostara_History.htm)
Witchvox: You Call It Easter, We Call It Ostara (http://www.witchvox.com/va/dt_va.html?a=usma&c=holidays&id=1991)
Ostara - Overview by Christina (http://www.witchvox.com/va/dt_va.html?a=usma&c=holidays&id=4050)
Ostara (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwQ3v8xHSzMBCZRXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhY3MwNjkxBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNARjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11s1hp8o8/EXP=1204687031/**http%3a//www.asiya.org/sabbats/ostara.html)

Other Spring Festivals

Nowruz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nowruz) and Noruz, the Fire of Spring (http://www.vohuman.org/Article/Noruz,%20The%20Fire%20of%20Spring.htm) (Iranian New Year/Spring festival)

Floralia - Ludi Florales (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floralia) April 27 to May 3
The Liberalia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberalia) 17 March
Holi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holi) -- Hindu Festival of Colors
Thargelia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thargelia) -- was one of the chief Athenian festivals in honour of the Delian Apollo and Artemis, held on their birthdays, the 6th and 7th of the month Thargelion (about May 24 and May 25).
Earth Day (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Day) -- April 22

All About Earth Day (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiMhHdVH_5gAC7FXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhZWFpM2ZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTEEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11qclqsmj/EXP=1205235361/**http%3a//earthday.wilderness.org/history)



Earth Day 2008: History of Earth Day (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiMhHdVH_5gAD7FXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFha21sbmxmBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTMEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11vig5b6p/EXP=1205235361/**http%3a//earthday.envirolink.org/history.html)



Earth Day - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkjeyHNVH_ycBZP5XNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5amY2Y2tnBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=11qgl6jtm/EXP=1205235250/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Day)


Two submitted to me by another member (thanks!):
The Hounen Matsuri of Komaki, Japan (March 15): Hounen Matsuri (http://www.yamasa.org/japan/english/destinations/aichi/tagata_jinja.html)* (*Note this link is NSFW)
The Kanamara Matsuri of Kawasaki, Japan: Kanamara Matsuri (http://www.2camels.com/kanamara-matsuri-festival.php)

Symbols
Eggs: see this post, link here (http://mysticwicks.com/showpost.php?p=3460119&postcount=7)
Rabbits/Hares & Hot Crossed Buns: see this post, link here (http://mysticwicks.com/showpost.php?p=3460123&postcount=8)

(more to come!)

S_Wodening
March 6th, 2008, 09:04 AM
Seeing as Eostre (Ostara) was an Anglo-Saxon Goddess, I thought I would add some links from Anglo-Saxon pagans:



http://www.ealdriht.org/modules/gods Eostre from Miercinga Theod.

http://englishheathenism.homestead.com/eostre.html Eostre from English Heathenism.

http://www.englatheod.org/eostre.htm Eostre at Englatheod.

http://www.ealdriht.org/modules/tides/ Easter Rites at Miercinga Theod.

Agaliha
March 8th, 2008, 03:55 AM
Thank you :)

David19
March 8th, 2008, 06:49 PM
Cool info and great links :).

Gyda
March 9th, 2008, 08:48 AM
http://www.wyrdwords.vispa.com/goddesses/eostre/index.html


Here's another that's decent.


Gyda

Brigid Rowan
March 9th, 2008, 09:16 AM
This is awesome, Im loving learning how this time of year was celebrated in all these traditions! Thanks to all who contributed to the thread. The Gebu/hot cross buns info was really interesting! "Cross buns were of course baked and eaten. While this could be a Christian addition, that cakes were often use in Heathen rites is apparent in any survey of the lore. And the cross may be symbolic of the rune Gebo or the buns may represent the sun wheel."

Agaliha
March 10th, 2008, 07:30 AM
Here's some stuff!!

Eggs


Pysanka:
A pysanka (Ukrainian: писанка, plural: pysanky) is a Ukrainian Easter egg, decorated using a wax-resist (batik) method. The word comes from the verb pysaty, "to write", as the designs are not painted on, but written with beeswax. (Wiki)

Pagan Beliefs: The coloured decorated eggs played a special part in the rituals of the spring festivals held in honour of the sun. The ancient peoples learned to be loyal to the creative powers of the the sun and recognized in the egg a reflection of solar power. Eggs were an ideal offering to the dead, who were expected to use the packaged regenerative powers to insure the continued cycle of plant and animal life.
Christian Beliefs: When Ukrainians accepted Christianity in 988 A.D., the egg transcended it's symbolism of nature's rebirth and became representation of man's rebirth. The egg symbol was likened to the tomb from which Christ arose and was easily incorporated into the Christian ceremonies. The decorated egg became part of the Christian tradition and Easter ritual. The traditional pre-Christian motifs and designs were not changed but a new layer of meaning was added, giving them Christian significance.
(source (http://www.finitesite.com/kalyna/eggshollow.htm))

They're very symbolic and detailed (and pretty)!
Pysanka - Ukrainian handmade Easter Egg: Art & Craft (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkjBKF9VHfuIAXRFXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ZGttNDBpBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=126767kf8/EXP=1205233866/**http%3a//www.geocities.com/pysanka_egg/symbolism.htm)
History and symbolism of Ukrainian Easter eggs (Pysanky) (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkjBKF9VHfuIAXxFXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5c2J1ZjkwBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=11vkma465/EXP=1205233866/**http%3a//eggs-files.tripod.com/pysanky_4.html)
Symbolism of the Ukrainian Easter Egg (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkjBKF9VHfuIAZxFXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bjNhdXZoBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=122nhmmct/EXP=1205233866/**http%3a//www.uazone.net/holidays/EasterEggs.html)
Pysanka - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkyXXGNVHO0cAeVpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhczFnMGlsBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMjMEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11octn302/EXP=1205234263/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pysanky)
Types of Decorated Ukrainian Eggs (http://web.mac.com/lubap/PYSANKY/Types.html)
How You Can Decorate Your Own Ukrainian Easter Eggs (http://www.lightlink.com/xine/bells/psanky.html)
Art Lesson Plan: Pysanky Ukrainian Eggs (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxplGtVHuxMAjRJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhYzl1NmxrBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNDcEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=12m4c46ga/EXP=1205234661/**http%3a//www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/high/Sue-Pysanky.htm)
Symbolism (http://web.mac.com/lubap/Symbolism)
Free designs/patterns (http://www.learnpysanky.com/designs.html)
General:

The Egg (http://www.xmission.com/%7Erraab/egg.htm)
ChristStory Egg Page (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkl_8F9VHZboAKsJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFha21sbmxmBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTMEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=122r5pf0m/EXP=1205234044/**http%3a//ww2.netnitco.net/users/legend01/egg.htm) --general and Biblical symbolism
Symbology: The Egg (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkl_8F9VHZboAMsJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhdG9ta3IwBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTcEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=12e0dah0j/EXP=1205234044/**http%3a//www.wiccanrede.silvercircle.org/1985_spring_egg.htm)
History of eggs (as food) (http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodeggs.html)
Ostara Egg Symbolism (http://www.asiya.org/sabbats/ostaraegg.html)
Did You Know...? (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxplGtVHuxMAgRJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhZTcxdWIyBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNDEEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=12hbvop8v/EXP=1205234661/**http%3a//www.globalgourmet.com/food/egg/egg0498/didyouknow.html)
Egg symbolism (http://www.theosophytrust.org/tlodocs/articlesSymbol.php?d=EggThe-0475.htm&p=18)

Agaliha
March 10th, 2008, 07:52 AM
Rabbits/Hares

ChristStory Rabbit or Hare Page (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkm8KH9VHvBAAmuNXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5amY2Y2tnBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=125r1f6hu/EXP=1205235850/**http%3a//ww2.netnitco.net/users/legend01/rabbit.htm)
Easter Bunny - Wikipedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkm8KH9VHvBAAoONXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bjNhdXZoBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=11tjifadc/EXP=1205235850/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Bunny)
Ostara's Hare: The Pagan Origin of Easter (http://altreligion.about.com/library/bl_easterbunny.htm)
Easter Origins and the Easter Bunny (http://landscaping.about.com/cs/pests/a/easter_rabbit.htm)
Rabbit on the Moon - A Short History of Easter (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkmmkH9VHFXkBRZNXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5bTVpNmhzBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDOQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=12acp0avd/EXP=1205236004/**http%3a//www.rabbit.org/journal/1/history-of-easter.html)
Hare & Rabbit (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxTCH9VH2gUAnqlXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhaHNuZGswBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMjAEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=121lra5cs/EXP=1205236034/**http%3a//www.khandro.net/animal_hare_rabbit.htm)
The Symbolism of Rabbits and Hares, by Terri Windling (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxTCH9VH2gUAmKlXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhdG9ta3IwBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTcEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=127e2rv7t/EXP=1205236034/**http%3a//www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/rrRabbits2.html)Hot Crossed Buns


"The practice of eating special small cakes at the time of the Spring festival seems to date back at least to the ancient Greeks, but the English custom of eating spiced buns on Good Friday was perhaps institutionalized in Tudor times, when a London bylaw was introduced forbidding the sale of such buns except on Good Friday, at Christmas, and at burials. The first intimation we have of a cross appearing on the bun, in remembrance of Christ's cross, comes in Poor Robin's Amanack (1733): Good Friday comes this month, the old woman runs, with one or two a penny hot cross buns' (a version of the once familiar street-dry "One-a-penny, two-a penny, hot cross buns'). At this stage the cross was presumably simply incised with a knife, rather than piped on in pastry, as is the modern commercial practice. As yet, too, the name' of such buns was just cross buns: James Boswell recorded in his Life of Johnson (1791): 9 Apr. An. 1773 Being Good Friday I breakfasted with him and cross-buns.' The vact that they were generally sold hot, howeer, seems to have led by the early nineteenth century to the incorpordaion of hot into their name."
---An A-Z of Food & Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2002 (p. 164)

"The pagans worshipped the goddess Eostre (after whom Easter was named) by serving tiny cakes, often decorated with a cross, at their annual spring festival. When archaeolgists excavated the ancient city of Herculaneum in southwestern Italy, which had been buried under volcanic ask and lava since 79 C.E., they found two small loaves, each with a cross on it, among the ruins. The English word "bun" probably came from the Greek boun, which referred to a ceremonial cake of circular or crescent shape, made of flour and hone and offered to the gods. Superstitions regarding bread that was baked on Good Friday date back to a very early period. In England particulary, people believed that bread baked on this day could be hardened in the oven and kept all year to protect the house from fire. Sailors took leaves of it on their voyages to prevent shipwreck, and a Good Friday loaf was often buried in a heap of corn to protect it from rats, mice, and weevils. Finely grated and mixes with water, it was sometimes used as a medicine. In England nowadays, hot cross buns are served at break are served at breakfast on Good Friday morning. They are small, usually spiced buns whose sugary surface is marked with a cross. The English believe that hanging a hot cross bun in the house on this day offers protection from bad luck in the coming year. It's not unusual to see Good Friday buns or cakes hanging on a rack or in a wire basket for years, gathering dust and growing black with mold--although some people believe that if the ingredients are mixed, the dough prepared, and the buns baked on Good Friday itself, they will never get moldy."
---Holiday Symbols and Customs, Sue Ellen Thompson, 3rd edition [Omnigraphics:Detroit] 2003, (p. 233)

"Hot cross bun, a round bun made from a rich yeast dough containing flour, milk, sugar, butter, eggs, currants, and spices, such as cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves. In England, hot cross buns are traditionally eaten on Good Friday; they are marked on top with a cross, wither cut in the dough or composed of strips of pastry. The mark is of ancient origin, connectd with religious offerings of bread, which replaced earlier, less civilized offerings of blood. The Egyptians offered small round cakes, marked with a representation of the horns of an ox, to the goddess of the moon. The Greeks and Romans had similar practices and the Saxons ate buns marked with a cross in honor of the goddess of light, Eostre, whose name was transferred to Easter. According to superstition, hot cross buns and loaves baked on Good Friday never went mouldy, and were sometimes kept as charms from one year to the next. Like Chelsea buns, hot cross buns were sold in great quantities by the Chelsea Bun House; in the 18th century large numbers of people flocked to Chelsea during the Easter period expressly to visit this establishment."
---Oxford Companion to Food, Alan Davidson [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 1999 (p. 114)

"Bath buns, hot cross buns, spice buns, penny buns, Chelsea buns, currant buns-all these small, soft, plump, sweet, fermented' cakes are English institutions...The most interesting of the recipes is perhaps the simple spiced fruit bun, the original of our Good Friday hot cross bun without the cross. These spice buns first became popular in Tudor days, at the same period as the larger spice loaves or cakes, and were no doubt usually made form the same batch of spcied and butter-enriched fruit dough. For a long time bakers were permitted to offer these breads and buns for sale only on special occasions, as is shown by the following decree, issued in 1592, the thirty-sixth year of the reign of Elizabeth I, by the London Clerk of the Markets: That no bakers, etc, at any time or times hereafter make, utter, or sell by retail, within or without their houses, unto any of the Queen's subject any spice cakes, buns, biscuits, or other spice bread (being bread out of size and not by law allowed) except it be at burials, or on Friday before Easter, or at Christmas, upon pain or forfeiture of all such spiced bread to the poor...If anybody wanted spice bread and buns for a private celebration, then, these delicacies had to be made at home. In the time of James I, further attempts to prevent bakers from making spice breads and buns proved impossible for enforce, and in this matter thhe bakers were allowed their way. Although for difference reasons, the situation now is much as it was in the late seventeenth century, spice buns appearing only at Easter--not, to be sure, on Good Friday when bakeries are closed, but about a fortnight in advance..."
---English Bread and Yeast Cookery, Elizabeth David [Penguin Books:Middlesex UK] 1979 (p. 473-5)

(Source (http://www.foodtimeline.org/easter.html#hotcrossbuns))

Agaliha
April 7th, 2008, 10:08 PM
Found another site!

Eoster: Mysteries of the Resurrected Child (http://www.cs.utk.edu/%7Emclennan/BA/JO-Eo.html).
Pagan origins of Easter celebrations (with an emphasis on the Hellenic tradition).

Agaliha
March 20th, 2009, 01:33 AM
Bumping for the vernal equinox tomorrow (N. Hemisphere)!

In the Northern Hemisphere spring officially begins at 7:44 am ET on Friday, March 20, 2009.

:)

LadyeFalcon
April 12th, 2009, 10:06 AM
Some resources on Ostara and Spring Equinox symbolism, traditions, lore and whatnot. Feel free to add more links and discuss!

**

(note: if you click on a link and it says: "This link is not authorized by Yahoo! If you would like to continue to this link's intended destination at your own risk, click here."
The link isn't broken. Instead of typing the URL directly, I copied the link from Yahoo's search, which gets old over time.)

The Spring Equinox is associated with, or known as: Alban Eilir, Eostar, Eostre, Feast of Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Festival of Trees, Lady Day, NawRuz, No Ruz, Ostara, Ostra, Rites of Spring, and the Vernal Equinox.

Spring Equinox


Celebrating Spring Equinox - School of the Seasons (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiljvcxH7sYAVGVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhNzhxdjVzBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=121idui7l/EXP=1204686563/**http%3a//www.schooloftheseasons.com/spring.html)
Spring (season) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiljvcxH7sYAWGVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhamdwMGpqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=12017nk9l/EXP=1204686563/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_%28season%29)
Spring Equinox celebrations of Christianity, Judaism, Neopaganism, etc (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiljvcxH7sYAWmVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhNGQ4c21qBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=128iv373n/EXP=1204686563/**http%3a//www.religioustolerance.org/spring_equinox.htm)
Spring Equinox: Facts and Misinformation (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB4nJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFidHZuc3FlBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTEEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=11pan8lba/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//www.tylwythteg.com/Spring.html)
Free Spring Equinox Ecards, Spring Equinox Greeting Cards, Happy Spring (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB5nJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFidmtiZG02BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTMEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=126pias3m/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//www.123greetings.com/events/spring_equinox/)
BBC - Religion & Ethics - Spring Equinox (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB7HJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFiMnZpYmx2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTYEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=131uqn9tq/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/paganism/holydays/springequinox.shtml)
Is Easter a Christian or Pagan Holiday? Unpacking the Pagan Elements (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkxHhvcxHwjgB9HJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFiOHFoZzh0BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMjAEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=12oi25mv9/EXP=1204686689/**http%3a//atheism.about.com/od/easterholidayseason/p/PaganChristian.htm)

Ostara


Ostara - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkmhrvsxHh7oAXR1XNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhaHBlYTduBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11n7fchi9/EXP=1204686827/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostara)
History of Ostara (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkliSvsxH0icAwiJXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFiajRtZ2V0BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTIEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANZUzE5NF8xM jcEbANXUzE-/SIG=12v30p1ik/EXP=1204686866/**http%3a//paganwiccan.about.com/od/ostarathespringequinox/p/Ostara_History.htm)
Witchvox: You Call It Easter, We Call It Ostara (http://www.witchvox.com/va/dt_va.html?a=usma&c=holidays&id=1991)
Ostara - Overview by Christina (http://www.witchvox.com/va/dt_va.html?a=usma&c=holidays&id=4050)
Ostara (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwQ3v8xHSzMBCZRXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhY3MwNjkxBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNARjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTMTk0XzEyN wRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11s1hp8o8/EXP=1204687031/**http%3a//www.asiya.org/sabbats/ostara.html)

Other Spring Festivals

Nowruz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nowruz) and Noruz, the Fire of Spring (http://www.vohuman.org/Article/Noruz,%20The%20Fire%20of%20Spring.htm) (Iranian New Year/Spring festival)

Floralia - Ludi Florales (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floralia) April 27 to May 3
The Liberalia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberalia) 17 March
Holi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holi) -- Hindu Festival of Colors
Thargelia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thargelia) -- was one of the chief Athenian festivals in honour of the Delian Apollo and Artemis, held on their birthdays, the 6th and 7th of the month Thargelion (about May 24 and May 25).
Earth Day (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Day) -- April 22

All About Earth Day (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiMhHdVH_5gAC7FXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhZWFpM2ZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTEEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11qclqsmj/EXP=1205235361/**http%3a//earthday.wilderness.org/history)



Earth Day 2008: History of Earth Day (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkiMhHdVH_5gAD7FXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTFha21sbmxmBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMTMEY29sbwNzazEEdnRpZANFMjc4XzExN QRsA1dTMQ--/SIG=11vig5b6p/EXP=1205235361/**http%3a//earthday.envirolink.org/history.html)



Earth Day - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkjeyHNVH_ycBZP5XNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5amY2Y2tnBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA0UyNzhfMTE1B GwDV1Mx/SIG=11qgl6jtm/EXP=1205235250/**http%3a//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Day)


Two submitted to me by another member (thanks!):
The Hounen Matsuri of Komaki, Japan (March 15): Hounen Matsuri (http://www.yamasa.org/japan/english/destinations/aichi/tagata_jinja.html)* (*Note this link is NSFW)
The Kanamara Matsuri of Kawasaki, Japan: Kanamara Matsuri (http://www.2camels.com/kanamara-matsuri-festival.php)

Symbols
Eggs: see this post, link here (http://mysticwicks.com/showpost.php?p=3460119&postcount=7)
Rabbits/Hares & Hot Crossed Buns: see this post, link here (http://mysticwicks.com/showpost.php?p=3460123&postcount=8)

(more to come!)




Thank You for the resources!!! I am always looking for accurate resources on the seasonal holidays, I have a hard time finding resources other than those based in Celtic lore. It is nice to see Lady Day in your list I didn't think anyone even recognized it any more :thumbsup: Thank You

perceval23
February 10th, 2010, 04:33 PM
Since we're past Imbolc, currently in Carnival season, and with Lent coming up, meaning we're getting closer to Spring...

Noticed some mistakes in some of those articles, including a huge one regarding the Easter Bunny. That one's a major pet peeve of mine. There is no historical or mythic basis to asociate hares with Eostre, nor should there be.

Eostre was a Sun Goddess according the the only source we have regarding her, Bede. Hares are associated, in all myths around the world, with the moon, and Moon Goddesses. We never hear about the "Rabbit in the Sun." We see the Hare/Moon Goddess association even today in pop culture, such as Luna Lovegood in the Harry Potter series and Sailor Moon.

The Christian Easter, like the Jewish Passover that it comes from, happens with the first full moon following the Vernal Equinox. In other words, the Easter Bunny comes with Spring's first full moon. So, those 16th Century German Protestants had the Moon and Hare lore right, and so many modern Pagans have it wrong. :)

Many have retroactively just made Eostre a Moon Goddess, so she can be the origin of the Easter Bunny, but that doesn't fit the actual account of her, Bede's description. Nor is there anything to associate the painting of eggs for Spring with Anglo-Saxon Pagans. It's well documented that that started with the Monotheistic Persians over 3000 years ago for Nowruz, their Vernal Equinox festival. The only thing Pagan about Ostara is the name. Literally everything else about it comes from Monotheistic religions originating in the Middle East.

Not that I consider that a problem. The Wiccan Wheel of the Year mixes Celtic and Germanic festivals, after all, so why not Middle Eastern ones, too? Some modern Pagans just call it something else, give it a Celtic name, or just call it the Vernal Equinox. Alban Eilir is Celtic, and avoids the Christian Easter associations and symbols, but it's symbols are taken from St. Patrick's Day, so... Well... :)

I've come to just see the period from the St. Patrick's Day celebrations through the Equinox through Easter Sunday as one big welcoming of Spring. Whatever you call it, that's what they are. Take, for example, the Catholic explanation of Lent, the lead in to Easter...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D8o2At_UUc

It's just that some things are centered around the Equinox, and others around the full moon following it, like the bunnies.

Twilight Siren
March 9th, 2010, 03:29 AM
Thanks for all the great posts everyone!!

parallax
March 10th, 2010, 06:19 AM
Eostre was a Sun Goddess according the the only source we have regarding her, Bede. Hares are associated, in all myths around the world, with the moon, and Moon Goddesses. We never hear about the "Rabbit in the Sun." We see the Hare/Moon Goddess association even today in pop culture, such as Luna Lovegood in the Harry Potter series and Sailor Moon.

I don't know that I'd call Eostre a sun goddess, Bede didn't either as far as I know. I think many have associate her name with PIE roots having to do with "east", "dawn" or "shining". So a rising sun goddess, perhaps, but that's a rather different function than a sun goddess.

perceval23
April 6th, 2010, 01:55 PM
I don't know that I'd call Eostre a sun goddess, Bede didn't either as far as I know. I think many have associate her name with PIE roots having to do with "east", "dawn" or "shining". So a rising sun goddess, perhaps, but that's a rather different function than a sun goddess.

It's also worth noting that Bede is the only source for the existence of Eostre, which is unusual for European Pagan deities. She doesn't even have a counterpart with the Norse, like every other Saxon deity does.

And, a deity representing the rising sun wouldn't be lunar, and therefore wouldn't have the hare association.

Early Wicca was based heavily on Margaret Murray's theories, leading to attempting to force fit old Eoropean Pagan lore and traditions into fitting with them. Murray was proven to be wrong in just about everything, but many who haven't looked into these things just take her theories as, well, Gospel. Again, that's mainly a personal pet peeve, but it does set me off, a bit. Going so far as to try to claim every Christian Holiday tradition is based on some European Pagan thing, like painting eggs and the Easter Bunny, just damages the credibility of Neo-Paganism as a whole.