PDA

View Full Version : Weather lore



Windsmith
April 24th, 2008, 05:17 PM
My Witch's Almanac (my personal version of a Book of Shadows) has a section on weather lore - the stuff people used to predict the weather before computer-assisted meteorology. I was updating it today and suddenly said, "Hey! Why haven't I shared this with my pals at MW?"

So here you are. All of these come from the Old Farmer's Almanac.

----

When the cow tries to scratch its ear
It means a shower is very near.
When it thumps its ribs with its tail,
Look out for thunder, lightning, and hail.

Dog Days [begin July 3] bright and clear
Indicate a happy year
But when accompanied by rain
For better times are hopes are in vain.

St. Swithin's Day [July 15] if thou dost rain,
For 40 days it will remain.

When spiders build new webs, the weather will be clear.

Listen for the sound of the first cicadas. The first frost of the year will occur about 3 months later.

An open anthill indicates good weather; a closed one, an approaching storm.

The sunflower raising its head indicates rain.

Clover contracts its leaves at the approach of a storm.

If corn husks are thicker than usual, a cold winter lies ahead.

If flowers keep open all night, the weather will be wet the next day.

The faster a cricket chirps, the warmer the temperature.

Lightning in the south is a sure sign of drought.

Bees will not swarm, before a near storm

When the down of a dandelion contracts, it is a sign of rain.

Lightning in summer indicates good, healthy weather.

If watercress beds steam on a summer evening, the next day will be hot.

Dust rising in dry weather is a sign of an approaching change.

Observe on what day in August the first heavy fog occurs, and expect a hard frost on the same day in October.

If the first week in August is unusually warm, the winter will be white and long.

If corn blades twist up, it will rain.

Folklore has it that the weather on each of the Ember Days foretells the weather for 3 successive months; that is, Wednesday, September 19 forecasts the weather for October; Friday, September 21 for November, and Saturday, September 22 for December.

If the geese on St. Martinís Day [November 11] stand on ice, they will walk in mud at Christmas.

If the first snow sticks to the trees, it foretells a bountiful harvest.

If sheep feed facing downhill, watch for a snowstorm.

Always expect a thaw in January.

Fog in January brings a wet spring.

He who drops a coat on a winter day,
Will gladly put it on in May.

If on January 12th the Sun shine, it foreshows much wind.

Expect rain or snow when burning wood pops and sparkles.

If Candlemas [February 2] be mild and gay,
Go saddle your horses and buy them hay;
But if Candlemas be stormy and black,
It carries the winter away on its back.

If March comes in like a lion, it will go out like a lamb. If March comes in like a lamb, it will go out like a lion.

So many mists in March we see,
So many frosts in May will be.

In March much snow,
To plants and trees much woe.

A windy March and a rainy April make a beautiful May.

A dry March, a wet April. A wet March, a sad autumn.

Moist April, clear June.

A rainbow in spring indicates fair weather for the next 24 to 42 hours.

Expect rain if hens spread and ruffle their tail feathers.

When the down of a dandelion contracts, it is a sign of rain.

Dust rising in dry weather is a sign of an approaching change in the weather.

----

Does anyone else know any weather-prediction lore?

daphnerose
April 24th, 2008, 07:41 PM
Thats great stuff! tys for sharing
The only one I can think of is the moon circled in red means storms coming.
I've heard a few more, but will have to wander the dusty halls of my head and try to remember!
daphne

TheWomanMonster
April 24th, 2008, 07:45 PM
One I learned as a child...
"Red skies at night, sailors delight.
Red skies in morning, sailors take warning."

I was a Navy-Brat. ;)

We had a discussion similar to this in Dreams + Div not long ago.
:)

Windsmith
April 25th, 2008, 04:05 PM
The only one I can think of is the moon circled in red means storms coming.I hadn't heard that one before. Thanks!


"Red skies at night, sailors delight.
Red skies in morning, sailors take warning."Oh, man, I can't believe I forgot that one! That's one of the grandmamma weather predictors! Egads.

Meadhbh
April 25th, 2008, 06:00 PM
My grandma taught me that you can read the comming winter on woolly bear caterpillars. The longer the black parts on the ends of the caterpillar, the harsher the coming winter.

daphnerose
April 25th, 2008, 08:37 PM
Thats one I was trying to think of Meadhbh!!! Dust is too thick in my head! :)

Agaliha
April 25th, 2008, 09:00 PM
How Interesting!
Thanks for sharing, Windsmith :)

I wonder if these are all true or just assumptions?

Like:
The sunflower raising its head indicates rain.

I never paid attention :2G:

Oh, another place for weather lore: Air/Sky: lore, spirits, myths, etc. (http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=160595)

TheWomanMonster
April 25th, 2008, 09:39 PM
Something I learned though I don't know if it's 'lore'
Leaves turning upward (they'll look silvery) shows a coming storm.

Agaliha
April 27th, 2008, 07:17 PM
Oh also see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weather_lore

Windsmith
April 28th, 2008, 04:36 PM
My grandma taught me that you can read the comming winter on woolly bear caterpillars. The longer the black parts on the ends of the caterpillar, the harsher the coming winter.I've heard so many about caterpillars that I can't remember any of them, and which ones are accurate. :lol: Thanks for reminding me of that one.


I wonder if these are all true or just assumptions?

Like:
[I] The sunflower raising its head indicates rain.


Oh also see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weather_loreSome of them are true; some are just old wives' tales. Some are true, but only in the geographic region where they were coined, but somehow they got disseminated nation- or world-wide, and most people assume they're universally applicable. That's one of the reasons I like the Wiki article you linked to; it goes into the science behind some of them and which ones have any scientific validity. Not to say that the other ones automatically don't, but that you might not want to plan your whole summer around 'em, you know?


Something I learned though I don't know if it's 'lore'
Leaves turning upward (they'll look silvery) shows a coming storm.Oh, yeah! I like that one.

Fireheart
April 28th, 2008, 05:05 PM
That's awesome! If you update it again be sure to let us know. I am such a weather buff, and this kinda stuff interests me :)

Faelon_Moon_Hawk
June 9th, 2008, 03:21 PM
i didn't see it listed but maybe i missed it,

If all the cows in the field are laying down, it's going to rain.

Crystal Willowtree
June 9th, 2008, 04:01 PM
these are all really interesting, thanks for sharing