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Faery-Wings
August 19th, 2002, 08:05 AM
http://www.fote.org/parents.htm

This is a good article to get you thinking a bit. It answers the who, what, when and whys of this question. :)

ANUR36
August 19th, 2002, 04:40 PM
My daughter goes to a great nursery school... its affordable, close to my work, the ladys are all wonderfull and its at a presbiterian church. Ive been thinking about exposing my lil one to my path more these days. She just turned 4 this month and something inside me tells me its time. Weve done a lil bit of magick together (Rune magick when she has a tummy ache and some essential oil stuff too). Do you think it would confuse her at this age to be taught of one thing all day at school and then another at home with me. Im not into forcing anything on my lil one (shes my life)... I just want her to know the beauty that I do...
So whatta' ya' think?

Faery-Wings
August 20th, 2002, 08:08 AM
I think as long as you teach her that there is no one right path, you'll do fine teaching her now. Hubby and I have talked to our kids a bit about family members who believe different things, stressing that is all right for *them*. For example, my husband is an atheist, my dad is a strict Catholic, our best friends are Jewish, and I am Pagan. ;) We tend to say things like, "in my opinion," "Some people believe," and then give them a chance to think about what feels right to them.


Right now, most of my "teachings" are more of the basic sort as opposed to religious structure. We talk about revering nature, using crystals, the belief that all things in nature have souls, reincarnation, using energy. I have touched briefly on the Gods and Goddesses, but again, I stress the "some people believe" part. To me, this part is the area that they have to figure out on their own. Just because I believe in the Lady and Lord doesn't mean that they are going to.

But these are just my opinions. :) It sounds ike you are doing the right thing, starting out slowly and not forcing her into any of it. I wish my parents were like that when I was little ( Not an option in a Catholic household apparently! heh!)

OK, done rambling for now...
I hope this helped/made sense.

BB

Chris

Twilight Garden
August 20th, 2002, 08:37 AM
Originally posted by chryssi1
We tend to say things like, "in my opinion," "Some people believe," and then give them a chance to think about what feels right to them.Yes. That's exactly what my husband and I do with his daughter. I am ALL THE TIME saying, "Some people believe..."

My step-daughter went to a Southern Baptist private school through second grade. During her second grade year (she's in 4th this year), her father finally started to discuss religion with her. She was being force fed the bible everyday at school. Part of their academics was memorizing bible verses and writing reports on sections of the bible. She was very happy to be learning some of the things her father believed since he never really discussed it with her before. Now she is always eager to learn more.

She learned very early in life that there are many different lifestyles because we have SO many different kinds of friends. I think that helps in letting a child recognize that no one way is the only right way. We also started going to a Unitarian Universalist Church in order to expose her to different things. (And it continues to enlighten us and allows us to create a faith of our own.)

mol
August 21st, 2002, 04:00 PM
It seems that most people go with the "Teaching them their is something bigger than us" route. I dont even know if that is the right route. I dunno. Its something that I have thought about ever since we had Trey. Should we sya this or that...or what? Ultimately I have been undecided so I just choose to go with the flow. Semele teaches him more about that kind of stuff anyway.

To me, I think I would rather not even introduce spirituality to a kid until they are old enough to really understand it. But, then...would that be too late?

The double edged sword strikes again.

ShadowStorm
September 14th, 2002, 01:35 PM
...but I'd like to add my bit anyway.

My daughter is my life. She is 18 months old. She is already showing an interest in the craft. So I give her little things to do which she enjoys very much.

A perfect example of this is thursday night just passed. I did a banishing in my house to get rid of some astral nasties, and she was NOT about to go to sleep.

So I gave her my two little hand held bells, and told her to say "go!!" and "out!" and during my banishing was this little girl's voice, very intent on her little "job", shouting "go!!" and "out!" and the sound of wildly ringing bells mingled with her laughter, which just filled my house with positive energy.!!

She loved it, and it added to my magickal protection.

If she sees me in a circle, and I am raising my arms in the goddess position, her arms go into the same position and she starts to laugh....a beautiful sound.

When I do a tarot reading, she becomes mesmerised by the cards.

So, slowly, I am showing her, little by little, our ways, and if she asks a question, I will do my best to answer her honestly.

She's going to her first sabbat circle on saturday next week.

Will my husband and I to guide her, we'll try our best to help her follow the right path for her.

I plan to teach her the basis of ALL religions, so that when she is old enough, she has the grounding to make an informed choice.

Faery-Wings
September 15th, 2002, 08:04 AM
Its never to late to join in a conversation, ShadowStorm. :)

Your daughter sounds very sweet and must be a joy to be around. Do you feel her to be an old soul? She sounds as if she really might be. And very connected to the Goddess too!

I knew my son was an old soul when he was first born, you could just see it in his eyes. He is six now and I still believe it.


BB

Flar's Freyja
September 16th, 2002, 11:14 AM
Originally posted by mol
To me, I think I would rather not even introduce spirituality to a kid until they are old enough to really understand it. But, then...would that be too late?

Hmmm......very difficult one. One one side, it seems best to begin teaching while they are very young and teachable and have that beautiful childlike belief in whatever they're told.....but on the other, one would question teaching them what they don't understand......

When mine were very young, we attended church and they participated in Sunday School and summer church activities and camps. They loved it. When they were old enough to understand and make their own choices, I allowed them to decide if and where and when they wanted to attend church. My oldest has never been interested in being part of an organized "religion" but does have a spiritual foundation. I think he's more Pagan than the rest of them because he worships fishing and the outdoors :T My middle son is searching and attends church on and off and my youngest participated in Wiccan information classes during military basic training and told me that he has decided to remain Christian. Based on my own experience, I don't think it does any harm to begin teaching before they have an understanding because I think that this contributed to my sons having some sort of spiritual foundation as they grew older.

SagaDraco
September 16th, 2002, 09:26 PM
I plan on supplementing my childrens education with a fair amount of homeschooling, and if possible, getting groups of parents and children(to stimulate social development) involved in a communal home-schooling, and keep them out of the disaster that is public schools entirely. I will most definately teach my children the Old ways,more as a code of conduct and philosophy than a de facto religion. Im gonna raise some damned good Viking kiddies.

Willow_Raindancer
September 29th, 2002, 07:33 PM
I'm teaching my child mostly by example, because that's what they learn anyway! When she asks religious questions,
I give her several answers. I tell her there is no "one" right answer. She will have to decide what sounds right to her.
She has learned some protection magick. I think it's important for all children to feel impowered! Not just for spellcrafting, but for abilities to make choices in life. A lot of adults I know have problems with being able to make choices they can feel good about.
I basically feel it's your child.
If you like the person you are,
then why not teach your child your beliefs.
Let them always know they are free to choose otherwise, and there are many paths.
Then if you've taught your child to respect others and self-respect, you can't go wrong!
Even if they choose a different path. ;)

Faery-Wings
September 30th, 2002, 07:32 AM
Hi Willow_Raindancer. Welcome to MW!!

I like what you said about If you like who you are, why not teach your child your beliefs. That is very wise. And respect- that is key, isn't it?

Hope to see you posting in here often.
:)

Willow_Raindancer
September 30th, 2002, 09:22 AM
Originally posted by chryssi1
Hi Willow_Raindancer. Welcome to MW!!

I like what you said about If you like who you are, why not teach your child your beliefs. That is very wise. And respect- that is key, isn't it?

Hope to see you posting in here often.
:)


Thanks! I plan on being around here a LONG time!
This forum is GREAT!
Blessed Be!
W/R

StormChaser
October 21st, 2002, 05:15 AM
I was forcefed the craft as a child.. *ya.. how many people in their twenties now say that?* Which is kind of funny to say as I went to a catholic day care center till i was 5. I was being told vaguely about God and Jesus and doing all that stuff at school. Going home and reading about greek myths... with expectations to go to rituals.. to be an example.. a prototype of sorts. Parents being bigwigs of the NE community, having founded UMass's Pagan Students Group.. and later Rutger's in NJ's Student Group.. i grew up having ritual responsibility fed to me. I was the handmaiden... it was dissappointing to them if i wasn't up for it. Dedicated to my path well before i was able to accept the responsibility or understand what it all meant.

I also thankfully was kept a bit versed on my native american roots *My biological father being 50% Narragansett*

I dropped out of involvement when i was 14.. parents split up. And came back to the community with my own views and needs from my spirituality. And recently I've found my native american family and been looking into their spirituality and way of life.

I have friends that were force fed religions.. others that never came in contact with them until they were "old enough" and then cavetched about never having it.. and others yet that were told and educated but not force fed and always given an option to explore.. and they seem to have been the most happy with their up bringing.

I think fear factor and expectance has to be watched more than anything in spiritual teaching really.

~Sarah

Willow_Raindancer
October 21st, 2002, 08:54 AM
Originally posted by StormChaser
I was forcefed the craft as a child.. *ya.. how many people in their twenties now say that?* Which is kind of funny to say as I went to a catholic day care center till i was 5. I was being told vaguely about God and Jesus and doing all that stuff at school. Going home and reading about greek myths... with expectations to go to rituals.. to be an example.. a prototype of sorts. Parents being bigwigs of the NE community, having founded UMass's Pagan Students Group.. and later Rutger's in NJ's Student Group.. i grew up having ritual responsibility fed to me. I was the handmaiden... it was dissappointing to them if i wasn't up for it. Dedicated to my path well before i was able to accept the responsibility or understand what it all meant.

I also thankfully was kept a bit versed on my native american roots *My biological father being 50% Narragansett*

I dropped out of involvement when i was 14.. parents split up. And came back to the community with my own views and needs from my spirituality. And recently I've found my native american family and been looking into their spirituality and way of life.

I have friends that were force fed religions.. others that never came in contact with them until they were "old enough" and then cavetched about never having it.. and others yet that were told and educated but not force fed and always given an option to explore.. and they seem to have been the most happy with their up bringing.

I think fear factor and expectance has to be watched more than anything in spiritual teaching really.

~Sarah


I always said Brainwashing a child into a faith is wrong!
That's not real belief if you ask me, because the child has no other experiences to weigh. I teach my child all I know about other religions. I let her know mine is not the only way;)
I also tell her she's not quite old enough to study any religion yet.
By the time she's 15 or 16 I'll re-evaluate her mental and emotional capabilities.
Then, if I feel she's ready, why not teach her my religion?
I'm teaching her bits now, when she asks. BUT I don't force her into it:D

Calen
June 1st, 2004, 03:33 PM
I was brought up Catholic, and while my parents are not 'intolerant' to other religions, persay, they definitely expect me to continue what they started. Nothing would make me happier than to be able to be honest with them about my beliefs, but I don't know if I will ever bring myself to do it. I think I would be a happier, more spiritually mature person if my parents had provided me with a religiously open enviroment.

Temair
June 2nd, 2004, 07:11 AM
My oldest lives with her father and he takes her to church. I realized I had to do something when she came over saying that Jezebel was evil because she didn't believe in God. Since then, she has come up with some very interesting questions, which I try to answer as best as I can. I find it hard to answer her "Do you believe in God?" questions. "Am I going to go to heaven when I die?" and all those kinds of questions. Unfortunately, since she is only 7, it is hard to explain my beliefs to her in the timeframe of her attention span. Fortunately, I have frequent visitation, and she has participated in some of the Esbat rituals we do from Circle Round. She does understand that her father and I believe very different things and that is okay, and she may choose what she wants to believe. One time she said to me, "I'm Christian at Daddy's house and Pagan at your house, Mommy." I tod her that she was really too young to have to worry about such things. My 5-year-old is really into pagainsm. She asks several times a week if we can do a ritual (which to her means an Esbat ritual), and loves to help do them by carrying the candle or incensce around the house. I think she understands that there are other religions, but since she isn't exposed to them on a regular basis, she doesn't come up with the same intense questions her sister does. Alas, we can't relly have calm religious debate with others at my house because my husband is in the Christian-hating phase. It mostly comes from his brother trying to convert us to Catholicism after he converted and telling his children that our beliefs were evil. It drove a wedge between them so deep that we haven't seen them in two years. It's such a shame. One of my brothers is devoutly Protestant, and my mother is nominally Christian. She doesn't go to church, but she does pray every once in a while. I am unsure of my other brother's beliefs, but he is far more tolerant then my Protestant brother.

As far as formal teaching, I have explained why I have three candles on my altar for the Goddess, and why they are white, red and black. Actually, I did that to start into the puberty talks, since she is closing in on that age and I want her to understand it. Not being very firm on my own beliefs makes it hard to pass anything on to them, but I think I have finally found my calling after ten years of searching, so hopefully that will change. I think that just like you have to take care of your child's physical and emotional needs, you have to take care of their spiritual needs, too. And those needs vary from child to child, and change as they grow. For my children at home (ages 5 and under), that means to me to teach what I believe. A they get older and can handle more information, I will introduce them to more religions, but I want them to have a solid spiritual foundation to start from. I feel that they have to learn to walk before they can step out onto any particular path. Teaching them more than one religion so young I am afraid will simply confuse them.

So that is how I approach it. I realize it has been almost two years since the original post in this thread, but some things are just timeless.

mucgwyrt
June 2nd, 2004, 07:29 AM
Yup, I've had little one's come in after bible-club saying "You dont believe in God so you're going to hell", plied with candy by the person running it :sick:
T'aint right.

aluokaloo
June 3rd, 2004, 03:14 PM
Do you suppose there any books that would make it easier for young children to understand about all sorts of religions in the world? Because young kids aren't always interested in long complicated pieces (I never was as a kid, and sometimes I still get bored with it) if there was that would be a great start. If anyone knows any books like that I would appreciate knowing because even though my kid is only ten months I think alot about any type of spiritual education, so she doesn't get confused or anything, although I believe that kids know more about the world then we think they know.

:thewave:

skye*
June 3rd, 2004, 04:07 PM
Do you suppose there any books that would make it easier for young children to understand about all sorts of religions in the world? Because young kids aren't always interested in long complicated pieces (I never was as a kid, and sometimes I still get bored with it) if there was that would be a great start. If anyone knows any books like that I would appreciate knowing because even though my kid is only ten months I think alot about any type of spiritual education, so she doesn't get confused or anything, although I believe that kids know more about the world then we think they know.

:thewave:


I HAVE SEVERAL BOOKS THAT ARE GREAT

PAGAN HOMESCHOOLING: BY KRISTIN MADDEN
CIRCLE ROUND/RAISING CHILDREN IN GODDESS TRADITIONS:BY STARHAWK,DIANEBAKER,ANNE E HILL
RAISING WITCHES/TEACHING THE WICCAN FAITH TO CHILDREN:BY ASHLEEN O GAEA

********THESE BOOKS ABOVE ARE MY FAV AND HAVE HELPED ALOT ABOUT TEACHING MY DAUGHTER AND EASY TO DO EXCERCISES AND FUN ARTSY STUFF************


ALSO BOOKS FOR TEENS
TEEN SPELL BOOK/MAGICK FOR YOUNG WITCHES:BY JAMIE WOOD
TEEN WITCH:BY SILVER RAVENWOLF

HOPE THIS HELPS:)
MERRY BLESSINGS

blugirrl1
June 3rd, 2004, 07:53 PM
Chryssi thanks for posting the link. but i have one question that always bug me. I have noticed a lot of times ( myself included ) pagans ask about should they raise kids in the pagan path. i have noticed that a lot of other religions have the opposite attitude. where it is natural to raise the child in the parent's religion. why is this? i wish i had gone with my gut instinct and raised my kids with my beliefs openly instead of keeping them quiet. my parents had no problem raising me catholic. well mom didn't. yet when i was older i found my own path. but i don't resent them raising me in their religion. i guess what i mean is other religions it is jsut expected that the child will be raised in the parent's religion ( mixed religion families ect. aside)

blugirrl1
June 3rd, 2004, 07:56 PM
Yup, I've had little one's come in after bible-club saying "You dont believe in God so you're going to hell", plied with candy by the person running it :sick:
T'aint right.

this happens to me with my son weekly. and your right it aint right. :(
i never thought the practice of plying with candy was right. in fact i told his aunt/ uncle that it was fine to take the kids to church with them if the kids wanted to go ( and they do it is about the only time they get to see aunt/uncle) but that i did not want them to have candy while there, so now they respect that and don't