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David19
June 14th, 2008, 03:54 PM
Does anyone know of any good Zen Buddhist meditation techniques (or any good Zen techniques at all). I've been reading up on some Zen things, in the shops, and online, etc, and I really want to start somewhere, but I just need some good starting places. Are there any good sites or PDFs that you'd recommend?, and also, are there any good books you'd recommend on Zen (I probably can't get the books right now, but I'll definitely keep an eye out for them).

Thanks for any help :).

punxzen
June 14th, 2008, 04:04 PM
Read The Way of Zen by Alan Watts

Sage
June 14th, 2008, 04:15 PM
Hello David! I have found these two sites very helpful in this area.

Zen Guide (http://www.zenguide.com/)

Zen Mountain (http://www.mro.org/zmm/teachings/meditation.php)

I hope they are of some help.
Sage

1111
June 14th, 2008, 04:32 PM
http://www.maximumbliss.com/

http://www.anmolmehta.com/blog/2007/04/18/free-online-guided-meditation-book-zen-meditation-technique-ch-1/

http://www.age-of-the-sage.org/buddhism/zen.html

http://www.tonyrispoli.com/

http://www.experiencefestival.com/a/BuddhistMeditation/id/52700

http://www.digitalbookindex.com/_SEARCH/search010religionbuddhism.asp

http://www.buddhanet.net/ebooks_ms.htm

http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2055.html

http://www.ccds.charlotte.nc.us/History/Japan/02/miklos/miklos.htm



I know I have more tucked away, I will look later.

BenSt
June 14th, 2008, 06:30 PM
One technique I find very helpful is that when Im doing something... even if it's totally mundane like washing the dishes... I put my mind on what Im doing and I dont think about anything else. I immerse myself in, for example, the act of placing my hand inside a cup with a soapy towel and watch as the grease is taken off.

I find that very helpful

David19
June 14th, 2008, 09:40 PM
Read The Way of Zen by Alan Watts


Hello David! I have found these two sites very helpful in this area.

Zen Guide (http://www.zenguide.com/)

Zen Mountain (http://www.mro.org/zmm/teachings/meditation.php)

I hope they are of some help.
Sage


http://www.maximumbliss.com/

http://www.anmolmehta.com/blog/2007/04/18/free-online-guided-meditation-book-zen-meditation-technique-ch-1/

http://www.age-of-the-sage.org/buddhism/zen.html

http://www.tonyrispoli.com/

http://www.experiencefestival.com/a/BuddhistMeditation/id/52700

http://www.digitalbookindex.com/_SEARCH/search010religionbuddhism.asp

http://www.buddhanet.net/ebooks_ms.htm

http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2055.html

http://www.ccds.charlotte.nc.us/History/Japan/02/miklos/miklos.htm



I know I have more tucked away, I will look later.

Thank you all very much for those recommendations and links, I haven't looked at all of them yet, but tomorrow, I definitely will, but the ones I've looked at definitely look very interesting and quite cool.

Thanks again :).

David19
June 14th, 2008, 09:42 PM
One technique I find very helpful is that when Im doing something... even if it's totally mundane like washing the dishes... I put my mind on what Im doing and I dont think about anything else. I immerse myself in, for example, the act of placing my hand inside a cup with a soapy towel and watch as the grease is taken off.

I find that very helpful

Thanks, I might try that next time I get the chance, it may even make washing the dishes a lot more interesting!.

BenSt
June 14th, 2008, 11:16 PM
Thanks, I might try that next time I get the chance, it may even make washing the dishes a lot more interesting!.

weoll you can do it with everything you do, thats the point lol. I mean if your writing a letter, put yourself completly into that letter and nothing else. if your reading a book put yourself completly into that book. If your on a walk, put yourself completly into the walk... notice everything on the walk and dont get distracted by the things at home or in the future. Its really about the moment right, putting yourself completly in the moment. Even if it is something a simple as say, brushing your teeth

sarabethv
June 15th, 2008, 08:13 PM
Another thing you might try is the relaxation just before bedtime. Lay there and allow yourself to go over all the stuff running through your mind and then release all your thoughts, feelings, etc. one at a time.

mermaid
June 16th, 2008, 12:06 AM
While reading is good, if you are seriously interested in studying Buddhism, more than anything I would recommend finding a good teacher. A monastic who has been in the order for at least 15 years, and part of a sect that is reputable. Don't devote yourself to them entirely for at least 5 years, until you really know them, because there are a LOT of crazy converts out there either masquarading or playing dress-up.

A good place to start would be by checking out some of the major teachers of the different sects and finding out what their lineage is.

If you are not so into Buddhism but more interested in meditation for relaxation and focus, there are alot of different approaches one can investigate. However unless you are certain that Buddhism is the right path for you, it would be best to find some form that is not too intertwined with religion.

sunny.spoone
June 16th, 2008, 12:31 AM
When I was purchasing my new mala, the sweet Tibetan man who runs the store suggested focusing on a point ahead of you. Study everything about that point of focus and experience it in every minute detail. It's worked wonderfully well for me. I focus on my breathing and my selected point. It's been very good for me.

clearing
August 25th, 2008, 06:31 AM
One technique I find very helpful is that when Im doing something... even if it's totally mundane like washing the dishes... I put my mind on what Im doing and I dont think about anything else. I immerse myself in, for example, the act of placing my hand inside a cup with a soapy towel and watch as the grease is taken off.

I find that very helpful

When I was purchasing my new mala, the sweet Tibetan man who runs the store suggested focusing on a point ahead of you. Study everything about that point of focus and experience it in every minute detail. It's worked wonderfully well for me. I focus on my breathing and my selected point. It's been very good for me.

Another way, which is similar to these, is to shift focus. Instead of focusing one a particular point or singularity, try to expand the focus as a screen. Watch with peripheral vision, watch everything you see at once, with no center of vision. But it is quite difficult to begin with, as it goes against human habit. This should not be done while driving, for example, or in situations where single focus is important. In essence, this is a shift from content to context - the screen of perception.