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halfwaynowhere
September 8th, 2008, 11:54 AM
I've got fifteen pounds of white base, and five pounds of clear. My mom is making me use it all up before she'll let me make "real" soap. I've got some colors and fragrances, but honestly prefer to just use stuff from the cupboard.
I just did a bunch of honey oatmeal, which I love. Any ideas for recipes? I had to toss out all my molds because all my soap making supplies were stored outside, and the heat ruined everything. So I'm using silicon cupcake pans as molds. I've got round ones, hearts, sunflowers, and roses. Unless i find some rose fragrance, i think i'm going to mostly stick to the round ones.
so, any ideas for fun recipes that use stuff i'd probably already have in the kitchen?

watersprite
September 8th, 2008, 12:40 PM
So what does your mother consider "real" soap?

halfwaynowhere
September 8th, 2008, 12:51 PM
So what does your mother consider "real" soap?

oh no, its not her, its me. i'm just dying to try making cold process soaps... but she won't let me start something new until i use up what i've already got. and i guess i got a bit crazy when i decided to get into the melt and pour stuff, as i bought around thirty pounds of soap base...

i just finished wrapping up the bars of honey oatmeal. I love them, they came out so pretty. i wrapped them in recycled paper, and as i was halfway finished, my mom decided it would be more fun to make little muslin drawstring bags for each bar, so she's making those, lol. I'll use them for my next batch, once i figure out what i'm making...

misty
September 8th, 2008, 01:12 PM
Try adding some essential oils if you have them laying around. You can add some herbs to it, but be aware, some will turn it brown.

You can try using some extracts (vanilla, strawberry, orange, peppermint, etc) but they are alcohol based and the scent will dissapate over time.

misty
September 8th, 2008, 01:14 PM
Another idea is to add some coffee grounds to the base. It smells good and works as an exfoliant.

halfwaynowhere
September 8th, 2008, 01:25 PM
Another idea is to add some coffee grounds to the base. It smells good and works as an exfoliant.

mmm... that sounds yummy.

thanks for the suggestions. I just tried a small batch using cherry extract and vanilla. i added some vitamin E, maybe that will help preserve the fragrance?
i forgot how much fun this is. its fun digging through the cupboards finding random things to try out.

watersprite
September 8th, 2008, 01:44 PM
AH!. Yes, the essential oils idea is wonderful, and I have plenty of lavendar soap as I like to take my shower at night and it relaxes me. And the coffee ground one is amazing for exfoliation. Anything with alcohol added will dry your skin and give you lines.

halfwaynowhere
September 8th, 2008, 02:01 PM
okay, so i won't use the extracts anymore...
we don't have essential oils of any kind. i don't even know where to buy them... would make things a lot nicer, since i'm trying to stick with mostly natural ingredients...

i have a few more ideas cooking in my head, might have to send my mom to the grocery store, though... i'd go, but i have no money right now... lol.

misty
September 8th, 2008, 02:06 PM
There are a lot of things you can add. Just be careful what you do add, because too much additive can take make the soap suds up less.

Another one to try is adding some baker's cocoa. It gives it a nice brown color and a subtle chocolate smell.

You know...I really shouldn't be telling you all this...I'll put myself out of business! LOL ;)

Ivy Artemisia
September 8th, 2008, 02:45 PM
I appreciate the ideas, too. I have some white soap base, and am loving the suggestions. :)

SilverClaw
September 8th, 2008, 03:57 PM
In my social group we were talking about soap making. Halfway how long have you been doing it ?

I have been wanting to make soaps myself especially for my daughters eczema I just have not had the money to do so.

halfwaynowhere
September 8th, 2008, 05:46 PM
umm, i've been doing the melt and pour for 1 1/2 to 2 years, but in very small batches, and not very often.
I don't know how well the melt and pour would help eczema, but as long as she doesn't get irritated by glycerin soap, i don't think it would be a problem.
I absolutely love honey oatmeal for soothing skin. the antibacterial properties of the honey is great, and the oatmeal is very soothing.

misty
September 8th, 2008, 06:22 PM
We have a customer who told us that her kiddos have severe eczema and that the goat's milk soap really helped with it. So if you're looking for something to help soothe, try that :)

vikinggoddess
September 24th, 2008, 09:46 PM
You could add charcoal, clays, calendula petals, cornmeal, apricot kernel powder, mica. The best essential oils are from http://essentialoils.org/ They are therapeutic grade. Many are wild harvested or organic. Any old essential oil doesn't cut it for me. Many essential oils are adulterated/ extended. You can test you oils by putting a drop on a piece of paper. Within 24 hours there should be no trace of EO left. This is not quite a good test though with really resiny EO's like Myrrh though. Speaking of Myrrh, resins would be another great add to your M&P.

vikinggoddess
September 24th, 2008, 09:52 PM
umm, i've been doing the melt and pour for 1 1/2 to 2 years, but in very small batches, and not very often.
I don't know how well the melt and pour would help eczema, but as long as she doesn't get irritated by glycerin soap, i don't think it would be a problem.
I absolutely love honey oatmeal for soothing skin. the antibacterial properties of the honey is great, and the oatmeal is very soothing.

Glycerin soap has a lot of suger and alcohol added to make it clear like that from what I have read. Not the best for the skin.

For eczema Pine Tar bars are a good choice. Also sea salt bars. The salt bars would be the best bet for a beginner I think. Pine tar bars are tricky to make, th.

banondraig
November 30th, 2008, 08:35 PM
I've added soy oil (aka Wesson) to my m&p before, and gotten rave results. Sage flakes will turn it an interesting shade of yellowish green, and cinnamon powder makes it a pretty brown. Dried rosemary makes a nice exfoliant. The needles scrub well and their oil is astringent, very refreshing..

misty
March 15th, 2009, 10:15 AM
I've added soy oil (aka Wesson) to my m&p before, and gotten rave results. Sage flakes will turn it an interesting shade of yellowish green, and cinnamon powder makes it a pretty brown. Dried rosemary makes a nice exfoliant. The needles scrub well and their oil is astringent, very refreshing..

You need to be very careful with cinnamon...it's not really skin safe and can cause severe irritation.

banondraig
March 15th, 2009, 09:22 PM
Oh, I don't use a lot of it, and only for myself.

Yvonne Belisle
March 21st, 2009, 11:04 PM
My three oldest kids were all allergic to soaps. Two outgrew the allergy one didn't. There are a few soaps he can use without severe eczema. One of them oddly enough is the melt and pours. The other is goats milk soap. Speaking of the melt and pours I need to make some soon. Thank you for the lovely ideas.

Christine50
March 27th, 2009, 01:42 AM
I make my homemade soap from lye, oils including coconut, olive, and sometimes lard. My other ingredients vary depending on what I am doing - fresh herbs - oatmeal - cocoa powder - essential oils but I do not have to much faith in them. I stick to the basics and it works well...what is cold pour and gycerine soap?

My friend just made her own dishwasher soap by rendering down all of the little bits of bathroom soap and adding water to it...

banondraig
March 27th, 2009, 10:44 AM
I make my homemade soap from lye, oils including coconut, olive, and sometimes lard. My other ingredients vary depending on what I am doing - fresh herbs - oatmeal - cocoa powder - essential oils but I do not have to much faith in them. I stick to the basics and it works well...what is cold pour and gycerine soap?

My friend just made her own dishwasher soap by rendering down all of the little bits of bathroom soap and adding water to it...

Melt and pour/glycerin soap is soap sold in large blocks to be melted down and remolded with one's own scent and color added. Most craft stores sell it, and additives, molds, and instructions as well.

Does your friend use that soap in an automatic dishwasher? It might leave suds all over her floor if she puts it in the machine, let us know how that turns out. It sounds like an awesome idea for handdishwashing, though. I might have to try it. :boing:

Sea-Sin
March 28th, 2009, 09:17 AM
Melt and pour/glycerin soap is soap sold in large blocks to be melted down and remolded with one's own scent and color added. Most craft stores sell it, and additives, molds, and instructions as well.

Does your friend use that soap in an automatic dishwasher? It might leave suds all over her floor if she puts it in the machine, let us know how that turns out. It sounds like an awesome idea for handdishwashing, though. I might have to try it. :boing:
I've grated soap into a pretty fine powder for doing laundry (not the regular bathroom soap, but some I made specifically for doing the laundry) as a dry laundry soap.
I've also made some for doing the dishes but as a liquid. There are two kinds of liquid soap you can make. The one where you grate or chop homemade soap into small pieces, heat and add water. But it does does tend to seperate .. so you need to shake it before each use. The other kind is made as a liquid and never forms a solid bar.
My dishwashing soap was only used for handwashing .. so I can't say how it would work in a machine. I would think that depending on where you live (water hardness) you would be better off using a low sudsing bar soap as the base.. and possibly even adding some vinegar to the rinse cycle if the dishwasher even has one (dunno if they do.. never owned one before).
IMO melt & pour soap wouldn't be good for a dishwasher since they are usually formulated to give off more suds.

banondraig
March 28th, 2009, 09:23 PM
I've grated soap into a pretty fine powder for doing laundry (not the regular bathroom soap, but some I made specifically for doing the laundry) as a dry laundry soap.
I've also made some for doing the dishes but as a liquid. There are two kinds of liquid soap you can make. The one where you grate or chop homemade soap into small pieces, heat and add water. But it does does tend to seperate .. so you need to shake it before each use. The other kind is made as a liquid and never forms a solid bar.
My dishwashing soap was only used for handwashing .. so I can't say how it would work in a machine. I would think that depending on where you live (water hardness) you would be better off using a low sudsing bar soap as the base.. and possibly even adding some vinegar to the rinse cycle if the dishwasher even has one (dunno if they do.. never owned one before).
IMO melt & pour soap wouldn't be good for a dishwasher since they are usually formulated to give off more suds.

I've had suds overflows from putting implements used for melt&pour in the dishwasher, so I strongly recommend against it.

Sea-Sin
March 28th, 2009, 10:16 PM
I've had suds overflows from putting implements used for melt&pour in the dishwasher, so I strongly recommend against it.
Yeah, that's what I figured. And also why I didn't recommend doing it since melt and pour soap is formulated for suds.

I haven't messed with melt and pour soap in years, roflmao.. I got hooked on cold process and I doubt I will ever switch back! For me, melt and pour is too soft and I don't care for the amount of sweating it tends to do.. however it is safer for most decorative molds than cold process soap.