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Glowy
November 26th, 2008, 06:25 PM
My Newfie is 10 months old, healthy and on Gold Standard Wold Cub brand food. He has been eating this his entire life. He is gassy normally, but today, I had to open a window.. it is foul:blech:. He is running and playing just fine. Between he and I, the gas only bothers me. He does like to get into the garbage, so he may have eaten something. He also eats really fast.

Any suggestions or should I just light a candle and adapt?

CheshireEyes
November 26th, 2008, 06:28 PM
:hairred:

Bean-O

_inabox_

CheshireEyes
November 26th, 2008, 06:30 PM
and i think this should be moved to MWAD cause its a naughty topic....i'm tellin'!!!! :hahugh:

Artiste-LiLi
November 26th, 2008, 08:14 PM
Is his food bowl elevated? If not you might try that as it will keep him from swallowing as much air when eating. Also, you need to slow down his eating..that will help him to not swallow so much air and it will allow his body to better digest his foods which will help him to not create so much gas. You might have to feed him a handful of food...wait a few minutes, feed him another handful and so on to force him to slow his eating. Is he around other dogs during feeding? That can cause some dogs to bolt their food to keep the others from getting the food. You might also add a few little bits of pineapple (fresh please) to his food, he may or may not eat it though, this aids in digestion. Victoria Stilwell and Cesar Milan both had some tips on slowing down a dog's "speed eating". They might have some tips online. Or maybe the Monks of New Skete.

Also, I'll ask a good friend of mine about it...she has 3 Newfs of her own and she does Newf rescue.

Also, LOCK UP THAT GARBAGE! lol. They love the stuff...but it is not good for them as you know; so, even if it means a padlock and chain...........

Shanti
November 27th, 2008, 02:43 AM
His fast eating defiantly may be helping create the gas, not well chewed means more digestive bacteria and enzymes to digest which equals more gas.
Gas is the bi-product of the digestive bacteria.
Cut down the bacteria needed to digest by making the dog eat slower and the gas should yield a bit.
Why does he gulp?
At his age he should be getting several small meals a day and not one or two big ones. He should have food in his belly all day long. He shouldn't be so hungry that he gulps his food down. He is a growing pup and needs lots of small meals.

Also, as stated...lock the garbage!!!
Its not like some tasty garbage will help the prob.

Glowy
November 29th, 2008, 03:51 PM
Thanks, I elevated the dog bowl, and his Vet told me two meals by the time he was 8 months. I am away from the house for 8.5 hrs at work. My son gets home at 2:40, lets him out and now will be giving him a cup of food as a snack.

I am getting pineapple too as I am positive he will love it. This pup has not come across a fruit or veggie he does not like.

Thanks ( the house does smell better:smile:)

Vampiel
November 29th, 2008, 03:55 PM
My Newfie is 10 months old, healthy and on Gold Standard Wold Cub brand food. He has been eating this his entire life. He is gassy normally, but today, I had to open a window.. it is foul:blech:. He is running and playing just fine. Between he and I, the gas only bothers me. He does like to get into the garbage, so he may have eaten something. He also eats really fast.

Any suggestions or should I just light a candle and adapt?

I dunno if id light a candle with all that gas floatin around

watersprite
November 29th, 2008, 04:11 PM
His fast eating defiantly may be helping create the gas, not well chewed means more digestive bacteria and enzymes to digest which equals more gas.
Gas is the bi-product of the digestive bacteria.
Cut down the bacteria needed to digest by making the dog eat slower and the gas should yield a bit.
Why does he gulp?
At his age he should be getting several small meals a day and not one or two big ones. He should have food in his belly all day long. He shouldn't be so hungry that he gulps his food down. He is a growing pup and needs lots of small meals.

Also, as stated...lock the garbage!!!
Its not like some tasty garbage will help the prob.

EXACTLY! It is hard to realize that they are still a puppy when they grow that big, but they are. AND still trainable. AND need those many smaller meals.

aluokaloo
December 9th, 2008, 03:34 PM
I dunno if id light a candle with all that gas floatin around

:rotfl:

lioncastle
December 16th, 2008, 12:53 PM
http://www.solidgoldhealth.com/products/showproduct.php?id=61&code=180

Is this the food your Newf is on?

When I see a problem with gas, I prefer not to go right to additions such as enzymes, which can be helpful if the probelm is intrinsic to the dog, but not as much if it's simply a matter of finding the right formula. You may need lower fat, a different fiber source - it depends, each dog is an individual. This is a very nice food, but the gluten content will bother some breeds.
I can help you with this, but first, I want to make sure I have the right product your pup has been eating. Foul and constant flatulence can be a sign of many issues and it's important to address them one at a time.

And please - DON'T elevate the food bowl. While this trend was popular amongst owners of bloatprone dogs many years ago, the Purdue study on bloat found that foodbowl elevation actually increases the risk. At this age your dog doesn't require several feeidngs per day, but since he's a gulper it may not be a bad idea. If your dog gulps and is gassy, it's super important that you NOT elevate the dish!

http://www.moonstruckmeadows.com/Bloat%20(GDV)%20Study.htm
Excerpt:

"These four (4) factors ARE associated with an increased risk of bloat in large breed dogs

1)Raising the food dish more than doubled the risk for bloat **
2)Speed of eating -Dogs rated by their owners as very fast eaters had a 38% increased risk of bloat
3)Age: The study found that risk increased by 20% with each year of age. Owners should be more alert to early signs of bloat as their dogs grow older.
4)Family History: Having a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or offspring) that had bloated increased a dog's risk by 63%."

Let me know if I can help more,
lioncastle

nannymouse
December 16th, 2008, 01:28 PM
I dunno if id light a candle with all that gas floatin around


Are you trying to blow us all to smithereens??

http://www.radgraphics.net/images/main/atomic%20explosion%20-%204.jpg

Vampiel
December 16th, 2008, 01:32 PM
:rotfl:

Glowy I didn't know your dog had it in em!!

Perhaps your dog is secretly in the military? (along with some squirrels I know)