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Kaylara
May 14th, 2001, 01:09 PM
Does any one here follow Shamanic paths? I am really interested in learning about native religions in various countries...

Thanks,

Kaylara

Yvonne Belisle
May 14th, 2001, 01:30 PM
My personal beliefs are similar to them. I would be very interested in anything you learn.

adrian
May 14th, 2001, 04:09 PM
I don't follow the shamanic path but i have become interested in the beat of the drum, it seems to touch me in some way. I know of a couple of drumming circles in my area but...how to get over my shyness???

Maggie
May 15th, 2001, 03:20 AM
Originally posted by Kaylara
Does any one here follow Shamanic paths? I am really interested in learning about native religions in various countries...

Thanks,

Kaylara

You might have more luck finding information if you look first for information about the religion within information about the region itself rather than looking for shamanic paths. The popularity of the word tends to ebb and flow <G> and sometimes it's not used by a particular religion even if the practices sound like what might be termed shamanic. There's an arguement going on within some celtic groups, for instance, about whether something called 'celtic shamanism' actually exists.

Which countries or regions in particular were you interested in?

Regards,

Maggie

Kaylara
May 15th, 2001, 12:27 PM
Well, I have been studying North and South American indigenous religions for a while now, and about the culture that produced them, but a lot of the information that I have found on the culture tends to cut out the religion, or to shed a bad light on it. I was wondering if anyone had info on say, Eastern USA Tribes and practices. (I actually am interested in all of the information that I can find on any indigenous tribes from any place on the globe, but that's just because I like to study these things. I almost became a cultural anthropologist, until I found out how many of them were killed by the tribes that they were studying!)

Thank you all in advance for helping me out with this...
:)
Kaylara

Yvonne Belisle
May 15th, 2001, 12:32 PM
I hope Bluecat reads this he is into past cultures as well we could get a really good conversation going in here!

Maggie
May 15th, 2001, 12:56 PM
Originally posted by Kaylara
Well, I have been studying North and South American indigenous religions for a while now, and about the culture that produced them, but a lot of the information that I have found on the culture tends to cut out the religion, or to shed a bad light on it. I was wondering if anyone had info on say, Eastern USA Tribes and practices. (I actually am interested in all of the information that I can find on any indigenous tribes from any place on the globe, but that's just because I like to study these things. I almost became a cultural anthropologist, until I found out how many of them were killed by the tribes that they were studying!)

Thank you all in advance for helping me out with this...
:)
Kaylara

Yeah, field work can sometimes be REALLY exciting, eh? :D

Well, first of all, keep in mind that NA religion is not a uniform thing--and that whites interested in it often run into a great deal of trouble simply because......also, the published material on it is a really, really mixed bag.......these are pulled from what I own myself, but as I said, the available literature varies wildly in quality.......

__God is Red:A Native View of Religion__ by Vine Deloria, Jr.
Deloria is an NA activist, his book is from that POV

__The Way of the Earth:Native America and the Environment__
by John Bierhorst. This one was a bit too New Agey for me.

__Native North American Spirituality of the Eastern Woodlands__
This one is from the Classics of Western Spirituality series, this volume is edited by Elisabeth Tooker.

__Keepers of the Earth__by Micheal Caduto and Joseph Bruchac
Bruchac is Abenaki, and he's written several books for children and for adults working with children.

Also keep in mind that that acceptance of the word 'shaman' among NA's seems to be mixed, don't be surprised.

Regards,

Maggie

Kaylara
May 15th, 2001, 01:19 PM
Thanks Maggie! The best book I have found on the subject is called The Medicine Wheel (I forget the Author) But I will definately check out those books!

Kaylara

Maggie
May 15th, 2001, 01:25 PM
Originally posted by Kaylara
Thanks Maggie! The best book I have found on the subject is called The Medicine Wheel (I forget the Author) But I will definately check out those books!

Kaylara


I've gotten these all within the last five years, so that they should be readily available. I do have more (am thinking of opening my own lending library--I am a bookaholic) so if these aren't useful--I have more! :D

Regards,

Maggie

Celtic_Angel
May 18th, 2001, 07:51 PM
Originally posted by adrian
I don't follow the shamanic path but i have become interested in the beat of the drum, it seems to touch me in some way. I know of a couple of drumming circles in my area but...how to get over my shyness???

The beat of the drum seems to be the only thing I can dance to other than a slow walz. Other then that, I'm stiff as a board and clumzy as an ox.

bluecat
May 18th, 2001, 09:25 PM
This is one of the best texts I have ever found that cover the subject.

SHAMANISM

Piers Vitebsky is an anthropologist and Head of Social Sciences at the Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, England. He is author of Dialogues with the Dead.

128 pages, 250 color and black and white illustrations, 25 maps, 7 x 8. UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA PRESS

ISBN: 0-8061-3328-7 Paper $12.95
--------------------------------------------------------------

There is also Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions

John (Fire) Lame Deer and Richard Erdoes

My copy is Washington Square Press, ISBN 0-671-55392-5

This one is a little rough around the edges and it strips away many romantic conceptions of what many people have been taught about Native Americans.
---------------------------------------------------------------

A very worthwhile piece of Fiction is Ceremony , Leslie Silko, Penguin Press, ISBN 0-14-008683-8

A fictional story about a Native American coping as a POW of the Japanese during WWII. Even though it's fiction it makes an interesting read.

-----------------------------------------------------------------



There are many more, but these are the titles I could remember and had the ISBN's for.


Blue :cool:

adrian
May 21st, 2001, 01:26 AM
Originally posted by Celtic_Angel


The beat of the drum seems to be the only thing I can dance to other than a slow walz. Other then that, I'm stiff as a board and clumzy as an ox. Not me, i love to dance and am pretty lite on my feet, i love dancing myself into a frenzy until i'm lite headed and breathing hard, it gives me a great feeling almost like a high...but the beat of the drum is something else and i now realize that i need to connect with others who are into drumming circles and such so that i can explore this new avenue.

adrian
May 21st, 2001, 01:34 AM
Thanks for the infomation Bluecat, but i'm not a follower of that path...though i should be. I say this because even though i feel a great affinity for the Egyptian path which is ancient, and i have to peice together and guess at a lot of things; the Native Americans are not a dead culture, they live and one can learn first hand about the spiritual aspects of this culture. I would be willing to learn about drumming and dancing but i still have to convert it to what i feel is Egyptian in order to feel complete within myself.
As of now i have a combination of Egyptian and African themes to go by but even some African spirituality leaves me feeling somewhat apprehensive.

bluecat
May 21st, 2001, 01:44 AM
Originally posted by adrian
Thanks for the infomation Bluecat, but i'm not a follower of that path...though i should be. I say this because even though i feel a great affinity for the Egyptian path which is ancient, and i have to peice together and guess at a lot of things; the Native Americans are not a dead culture, they live and one can learn first hand about the spiritual aspects of this culture. I would be willing to learn about drumming and dancing but i still have to convert it to what i feel is Egyptian in order to feel complete within myself.
As of now i have a combination of Egyptian and African themes to go by but even some African spirituality leaves me feeling somewhat apprehensive.

You follow the path that you follow, not the path you are "supposed" to follow, after all how do we know what path we are supposed to follow, except for the one that calls us! :)

Blue :cool:

adrian
May 21st, 2001, 09:21 AM
Originally posted by bluecat


You follow the path that you follow, not the path you are "supposed" to follow, after all how do we know what path we are supposed to follow, except for the one that calls us! :)

Blue :cool: Well said my friend but with the peices to the puzzle scattered through history it is hard to follow this path that called me, and at times i am so bewildered by it that i just want to forget about it but it keeps calling out to me so i stick with it; just when i think i can't do anything else...another peice to the spiritual puzzle is revealed. Someone once told me it would be a life long endeavor and i'm starting to believe them.

bluecat
May 21st, 2001, 09:27 AM
Originally posted by adrian
Well said my friend but with the peices to the puzzle scattered through history it is hard to follow this path that called me, and at times i am so bewildered by it that i just want to forget about it but it keeps calling out to me so i stick with it; just when i think i can't do anything else...another peice to the spiritual puzzle is revealed. Someone once told me it would be a life long endeavor and i'm starting to believe them.

You never quit finding the pieces to the puzzle, at least I hope I never do. :)

Blue :cool:

Dria El
June 2nd, 2001, 03:42 PM
Originally posted by Kaylara
(I actually am interested in all of the information that I can find on any indigenous tribes from any place on the globe, but that's just because I like to study these things. I almost became a cultural anthropologist, until I found out how many of them were killed by the tribes that they were studying!)

Thank you all in advance for helping me out with this...
:)
Kaylara

I just finished a book called Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy by Mercea Eliade. It's a little dry but it covers alot of different cultures and their practices.

Maggie
June 2nd, 2001, 10:12 PM
Originally posted by Dria El


I just finished a book called Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy by Mercea Eliade. It's a little dry but it covers alot of different cultures and their practices.



Eliade's books are very, very, very good--although I certainly agree they're a bit dry! He's written several others, including one called __The Sacred and the Profane__ about the significance of religion and ritual in daily life and culture.

Regards,

Maggie

Dria El
June 2nd, 2001, 10:27 PM
Originally posted by Maggie


Eliade's books are very, very, very good--although I certainly agree they're a bit dry! He's written several others, including one called __The Sacred and the Profane__ about the significance of religion and ritual in daily life and culture.

Regards,

Maggie

Thanks Maggie! I'll have to check it out. I loved it for the good information but I had to work to get through it. I'm a fairly voracious reader and it doesn't usually take me long to get through most books but that one took MONTHS! I still recommend it though but it's not for the faint of heart.

Maggie
June 2nd, 2001, 10:36 PM
Originally posted by Dria El


Thanks Maggie! I'll have to check it out. I loved it for the good information but I had to work to get through it. I'm a fairly voracious reader and it doesn't usually take me long to get through most books but that one took MONTHS! I still recommend it though but it's not for the faint of heart.



Don't I know it!!!!!!! I have another of his, __Occultism, Witchcraft, and Cultural Fashions__. It's a collection of six of his essays about how these trends develop from archaic roots and periodically resurface. Sounds fascinating, yes? I haven't had the nerve to start it yet................:p

Regards,

Maggie

Dria El
June 2nd, 2001, 10:59 PM
Originally posted by Maggie


Don't I know it!!!!!!! I have another of his, __Occultism, Witchcraft, and Cultural Fashions__. It's a collection of six of his essays about how these trends develop from archaic roots and periodically resurface. Sounds fascinating, yes? I haven't had the nerve to start it yet................:p

Regards,

Maggie

It does sound fascinating but I think I'll read some 'lighter' books first. :)

Socharis
July 1st, 2001, 06:04 AM
I am a Shamanic Wiccan if thats any help?

AutumnFire
July 3rd, 2001, 06:15 PM
I hope this may help some. I am familar with the LaKota and Shawnee shamanistic paths because both my grandfathers were of native american heritage...one full blood and one half. While ative tribes n the americas are similar in some ways, there are some major differences among individual tribes, just as here are among different countries. Some tend to lump shamanism into ne category, when each culture has their own individality. You may consider attending pow-wows and natve gatherings in your area. You are bound to run into shaman there
and most would be honored to teach you if only asked. I hope this helps in some small way. Bountiful Blessings! Autumn-Fire

Arduinna
August 10th, 2001, 05:51 PM
I can highly recommend The Celtic Shaman a handbook; by John Matthews

BrightStar
August 13th, 2001, 03:21 PM
Hi all!
A good book on indigenous spirituality in North America is Black Elk Speaks by John Neihar.Don't confuse this with books written by a supposed descendent of Black Elk,which are discredited by the Native American community.
Peace and Love
BrightStar

Danustouch
August 13th, 2001, 03:37 PM
Kaylara...

You might try that book i spoke of in Scientific Pagan...the Eagles Quest. I think it's by Thomas Wolf. (wolf is definately the authors last name). It is shamanic practices, backed up by evidence found in physics. Interesting stuff. Another good book I got, is called

"Shamans, Healers, and Medicine Men". By Holger Kalweit.

I also REALLY enjoyed "Black Elk Speaks"..by John Neihardt. I used to have a book called "medicine power"..I forgot the authors name. I let a friend borrow it, and NEVER got it back. Oh..wait..just remembered the authors name. Brad Steiger. That is also a great book.

If you are interested in Vision Quests...i'd reccomend a book called "Quest" by Denise Linn. Many of her ideas come from Native American roots, but she has adapted them to her own ways...so it's kinda interesting.

marevard
August 13th, 2001, 03:53 PM
If you like, I'll tell you how my search into 'primitive cultural believes' via art, myth and stories turns out. It's going slow, to many things on my plate. But there's a different way to find info you might want.... primitive art... atleast.. uh.. I think :)