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Cinnamon1991
March 1st, 2009, 08:57 AM
Hi,
Does anyone have any good information on Gallo-Roman Reconstructionism? There's hardly anything on the internet and I can't find any books either. Maybe I'm looking in the wrong places or am I using incorrect search terms, but I'd like to find out some more because Gallo-Roman deities and religion fascinates me.

I hope anyone can help. Thanks

Cinnamon1991 :)

Son of Goddess
March 1st, 2009, 08:05 PM
I'd check out Adkins & Adkins' Dictionary of Roman Religion. It lists the numerous Gaulish and Celtic deities that were syncretized to Roman deities. Not much of a start, but a start nonetheless.

Seren_
March 2nd, 2009, 07:14 AM
Hmmm. I went looking for some threads because I know we have some occasional posters who are on this sort of path, but there doesn't seem to be anything. The closest I could find is the Celto-Germanic thread, which has got some Gaulish stuff:

http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=65943

It might be worth looking at Epona.net (http://www.epona.net) as well. It's not about reconstructionism, really, but it's run by Nantonos and Ceffyl who are members here. I know Nantonos identifies as a Gallo-Roman Reconstructionist, anyway.

Perhaps you'd like to ask some questions here or on the groups that Tomas linked to. I'm sure somebody can chip in, or point you in the right direction.

For the more historical/archaeological books on Gaulish gods and religion, if you can find it, The Celtic Gauls: Gods, Rites and Sanctuaries by Jean-Louis Brunaux is one of the seminal works on the subject. It's extremely expensive though, so you might to look through the library for it. It's a little dated now, but still well worth a read.

I'd also recommend:

The Ancient Celts - Barry Cunliffe
The Celts: A History From Earliest Times to the Present - Bernhard Maier
Gods of the Celts - Miranda Green

They make for some good overviews (though I don't really rate Cunliffe on his interpretation of religion, to be honest - Maier is far better). Miranda Green tends to concentrate on Gaul a lot in her work, so she's worth a read and quite accessible, though I don't like her insistence on solar deities and so forth.