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Seren_
December 21st, 2009, 02:46 PM
I thought I'd dust off a few cobwebs round here and post a link to a new interview with Erynn Rowan Laurie in Aontacht:

Here, which takes you to the page to download the pdf (http://www.druidicdawn.org/node/1893)

It's a good read, and I think it raises some good points, especially about the misconceptions surrounding CR and some of the problems beginners encounter.

Any thoughts?

odubhain
December 24th, 2009, 06:45 AM
I thought I'd dust off a few cobwebs round here and post a link to a new interview with Erynn Rowan Laurie in Aontacht:

Here, which takes you to the page to download the pdf (http://www.druidicdawn.org/node/1893)

It's a good read, and I think it raises some good points, especially about the misconceptions surrounding CR and some of the problems beginners encounter.

Any thoughts?


I thought the interview was reasonable and encouraging for CR and those seeking to learn from it.

Of course, I also sensed some undertones in it of elitism even though Erynn tries her best to encourage CR people to be open and considerate. I'm referring to the areas where she seems to be assuming that anyone attempting to be a Celtic Shaman is off base and out in the woods. Simply put, Druid practice has Shamanism at its spiritual and magical roots. Knowledge and study help shape these practices, abilities and sources of information for Druids, but the alternate reality, Shamanic roots of the human spirit and extra senses are there none-the-less.

I also differ with her on her seeming put down of Ogham systems using trees as their basis (talking about astrology and probably divination/cosmology). It is true that much misinformation is out there on the topic but that's no reason to cut down all the trees in the Ogham system to put up a strictly linguistic parking lot. Just because Robert Graves was wrong doesn't mean that he was not also right. These two previous points are not the major thrusts of the interview. They are just where I differ with her attitudes and approach.

When it comes to subject matter on the Ogham or references, I think she does a great job. My take is different from hers but I appreciate that she seems to be encouraging people to do their own study and research to develop a living, breathing system of their own. In the final usefulness of the Ogham to CR and Druids, we are all students searching for answers and understanding. It stands to reason that each of us will find those that speak uniquely to us as individuals.

She makes oblique references to the LFR (of recent controversy) but seems to be saying that a system of beliefs that works for a person is OK; just don't claim that it's the absolute historical truth. In that same vein, she acknowledges something Isaac Bonewits has long said in that scholarship and knowledge on the subject of Druids and CR has been changing for the past 20 years. Things held to be true have been shown to be not as true and I hope that things held to be false can have been imbued with understanding.

Isaac has said that one is cursed by having to read one's writings and teachings from many years ago. I think that is the blessing and the curse of youth and research. One jumps in and breaks a lot of eggs but eventually things improve with people and their scholarship if they really are seeking truth in a mostly open minded way. Erynn has walked her own talk in that approach though as I said in my opening response, there is a current in CR, in her and in those with whom she associates that seems to try to sabotage the gains that open-mindedness have brought it.

Kudoes to anyone who advances knowledge in this area. Erynn has done that and I hope she continues to do so. She is a radiator and not a cold sink. I sit here at 12 degrees outside in the aftermath of a blizzard so radiators are important to me. :-) I sometimes feel that way about CR in general (it needs more radiators and fewer sinks).

Excuse me but there seems to be a Green Warrior recently arrived from the outside with an axe that wants to play a game.

Searles O'Dubhain