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David19
March 24th, 2010, 09:45 PM
I was just wondering if anyone here has read C.S. Lewis's works, I haven't but, I've heard that his work is very good, and, also, in contrast to the Fundamentalists, he didn't believe Christianity possessed the only way, but, actually believed Platonism was perfectly valid path to Salvation, as well being friends with some Golden Dawn members.

I have flicked through some of his works, and it seems very interesting, I want to get his book 'The Discarded Image - An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature', as that was recommended on a Renassiance Astrology group I'm on as a really good intro to the worldview of the Renaissance (which, apparantly, helps if you want to practice the Astrology, and magic, of that time period).

I've heard his beliefs were that it was your character, and not your beliefs, that got you into Heaven, so, in general, he seemed like a very interesting person.

Anyway, has anyone else read C.S. Lewis' works, and, if so, what do you think of them?.

Gaudior
March 24th, 2010, 10:04 PM
I am not a Christian, but I find C.S. Lews to be facinating. The Screwtape Letters is a favorite of mine.

David19
March 25th, 2010, 10:03 PM
I am not a Christian, but I find C.S. Lews to be facinating. The Screwtape Letters is a favorite of mine.

I'm not Christian either, but, he definitely seems really interesting, I might check out 'The Screwtape Letters', and other books of his.

Tom Terrific
March 26th, 2010, 09:05 AM
I've heard his beliefs were that it was your character, and not your beliefs, that got you into Heaven, so, in general, he seemed like a very interesting person.

I've read some of CS Lewis' stuff--mostly his fiction, though not exclusively. Besides the seven-book series, The Chronicles of Narnia, he also wrote a three-book science fiction series which is definitely not for children--especially the last one.

My impression of him is that he was a brilliant man with a profound insight into Christian spirituality. My father was a medical school department head and a "Bible" Christian, but unfamiliar with Lewis. I once gave him one of Lewis' non-fiction books, a book of devotionals, and he later told me that reading it was like reading the book of Proverbs. Coming from someone like my father, that is high praise indeed.

I'm not sure that Lewis believed that character is what saves you, though the point may be a fine one. There is a passage in the last book of the Narnia series, The Last Battle, where a young man who has worshipped a demon (Tash) all his life, thinking it to be divine, and who has always believed the actual divine being (Aslan) to be a demon, finds himself on the other side of the veil. When he sees Aslan approaching, he trembles. Nevertheless, despite his error, Aslan welcomes him into heaven.

The young man, puzzled, asks if it is true, then, as some have said, that he and Tash are the same being; and Aslan answers No, explaining that his nature and Tash's are such that any good done in Tash's name is actually done in his, and any evil done in his name is actually done in Tash's.

This little passage in a children's book has opened the eyes of more than one Christian to the possibility that there is more than one path to the divine.

I will also say that Lewis is the only Christian who has ever seriously challenged my Paganism. He will make you think. I recommend him as highly as any modern author I have ever read.

Have you seen the film, "Shadowlands"?

Shaedema
March 26th, 2010, 09:24 AM
I have very little knowledge about Lewis- other than the Chronicles (which I liked, but not really in love with). But I do think that there are many authors that (either intentionally or totally by accident) have written something that has insight.

Now I'm curious about some of Lewis' other books. :bigredgri (Thanks Tom. I didn't even know about his adult sci-fi :smileroll)

GabrielWithoutWings
March 26th, 2010, 09:39 AM
I will also say that Lewis is the only Christian who has ever seriously challenged my Paganism. He will make you think. I recommend him as highly as any modern author I have ever read.

He does present a good case for moral theism, but not for Christianity so much. He loses me entirely on his views on sex under the tradition of the Church. He leaves out an L in his Liar, Lunatic, Lord conclusion (that being Legend).

But, he's a great read.

David19
March 26th, 2010, 09:55 PM
I've read some of CS Lewis' stuff--mostly his fiction, though not exclusively. Besides the seven-book series, The Chronicles of Narnia, he also wrote a three-book science fiction series which is definitely not for children--especially the last one.

The Science Fiction series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Space_Trilogy) is one I really want to read, as I've heard good things about it, and, apparantly (according to John Michael Greer anyway), some of the magical concepts and rituals are quite accurate (maybe he picked it up from some Golden Dawn friends?).


My impression of him is that he was a brilliant man with a profound insight into Christian spirituality. My father was a medical school department head and a "Bible" Christian, but unfamiliar with Lewis. I once gave him one of Lewis' non-fiction books, a book of devotionals, and he later told me that reading it was like reading the book of Proverbs. Coming from someone like my father, that is high praise indeed.

I'm not sure that Lewis believed that character is what saves you, though the point may be a fine one. There is a passage in the last book of the Narnia series, The Last Battle, where a young man who has worshipped a demon (Tash) all his life, thinking it to be divine, and who has always believed the actual divine being (Aslan) to be a demon, finds himself on the other side of the veil. When he sees Aslan approaching, he trembles. Nevertheless, despite his error, Aslan welcomes him into heaven.

The young man, puzzled, asks if it is true, then, as some have said, that he and Tash are the same being; and Aslan answers No, explaining that his nature and Tash's are such that any good done in Tash's name is actually done in his, and any evil done in his name is actually done in Tash's.

This little passage in a children's book has opened the eyes of more than one Christian to the possibility that there is more than one path to the divine.

I will also say that Lewis is the only Christian who has ever seriously challenged my Paganism. He will make you think. I recommend him as highly as any modern author I have ever read.

Have you seen the film, "Shadowlands"?

I haven't seen Shadowlands, but, I might have too now. His work definitely seems really interesting, I might have to read up on him some more (I want to get 'The Discarded Image' and his Space trilogy series first, though).

Tom Terrific
March 27th, 2010, 10:31 AM
I haven't seen Shadowlands, but, I might have too now. His work definitely seems really interesting, I might have to read up on him some more (I want to get 'The Discarded Image' and his Space trilogy series first, though).

Lewis can lead you to some other interesting authors. I think many Pagans would enjoy the fiction of Charles Williams, who wrote seven "supernatural thrillers"; Williams was a friend of Lewis', a Theosophist (I'm told) and a very literate man. I have read several of them, though not all. A friend once told me that they should be read in a particular order, so if you plan to read them drop me a line.

If you read Lewis' spiritual autobiography, Surprised by Joy, you'll discover the lesser-known works of George MacDonald. MacDonald was a Victorian and he writes like one--enough verbiage in one novel to sustain two, by modern standards--yet, there is great depth and tenderness in his writing, and--dare I say it--a magical otherworldliness that should resonate with Pagans.

MacDonald was a 19th-century Christian minister in Scotland. I was very surprised to learn recently that he wrote a number of what today would be called romance novels; I can't speak for them. The books I can recommend are Phantastes, Lilith, At the Back of the North Wind and the compendium of shorter pieces entitled The Gifts of the Child Christ, in addition to the more well-known children's books, The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie. Any Pagan that doesn't have a problem with Christianity should find himself more at home in these books than he might have expected.

I hope you enjoy what you find in this narrow genre. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

Tobias
March 27th, 2010, 11:35 AM
C.S. Lewis has profoundly impacted my life. Both the Chronicles of Narnia and the boxed sci-fi series by him are displayed prominently in my office. My son is named "Caspian"... need I say more? lol

That gem Tom mentions from The Last Battle has come to mind often. He restates it in theological terms I think in Mere Christianity, if you ever want to look it up. I thought about the possibilities a lot when I was looking into Theistic Satanism. It seemed like some Satanists at least, were villainizing God while considering Satan to be their saviour! Considering the fact that Christians forget (forgive?) their God for all the terrible things he had the Israelites do to people in the O.T., good and bad are simply a part of both their mythologies. Who's to say which god you get, especially when you call out to the skies using such generic terms like "God" or "Satan"?? :)

The problem I have with Lewis, is that he wrote to a generation of people and their issues that I can't completely follow. Not knowing what he's arguing against, makes it difficult to follow his train of thought. Probably my favorite book is his allegorical story of his own journey called The Pilgrim's Regress. It's deep, like all his writings, and I get lost often on which philosophical mindset he's attacking when. I have the same problem though too with the last of the sci-fi books, That Hideous Strength, which I can barely follow.

Tobias
March 27th, 2010, 11:47 AM
Oh, and I just love this site dedicated to him!

Clive Staples Lewis has been perhaps the single most useful tool of Satan since his appearance in the Christian community...

here: (http://www.balaams-ass.com/JOURNAL/homemake/cslewis.htm)

They dedicate the whole site to bashing the guy for all the paganism he inserted into his writing, and perhaps even practiced in his life! If you can get past the negative tone it's all written in, it's awesome!

Apparently he saw Apollo as an early form of Christ, and could barely keep himself from worshiping Him when visiting Delphi... darn, I read this a long time ago and need to check it out again!

David19
March 27th, 2010, 10:36 PM
Lewis can lead you to some other interesting authors. I think many Pagans would enjoy the fiction of Charles Williams, who wrote seven "supernatural thrillers"; Williams was a friend of Lewis', a Theosophist (I'm told) and a very literate man. I have read several of them, though not all. A friend once told me that they should be read in a particular order, so if you plan to read them drop me a line.

If you read Lewis' spiritual autobiography, Surprised by Joy, you'll discover the lesser-known works of George MacDonald. MacDonald was a Victorian and he writes like one--enough verbiage in one novel to sustain two, by modern standards--yet, there is great depth and tenderness in his writing, and--dare I say it--a magical otherworldliness that should resonate with Pagans.

MacDonald was a 19th-century Christian minister in Scotland. I was very surprised to learn recently that he wrote a number of what today would be called romance novels; I can't speak for them. The books I can recommend are Phantastes, Lilith, At the Back of the North Wind and the compendium of shorter pieces entitled The Gifts of the Child Christ, in addition to the more well-known children's books, The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie. Any Pagan that doesn't have a problem with Christianity should find himself more at home in these books than he might have expected.

I hope you enjoy what you find in this narrow genre. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

Thanks for all that info, and I'll definitely try and check out those authors you mentioned, I think I might enjoy them actually.


C.S. Lewis has profoundly impacted my life. Both the Chronicles of Narnia and the boxed sci-fi series by him are displayed prominently in my office. My son is named "Caspian"... need I say more? lol

That gem Tom mentions from The Last Battle has come to mind often. He restates it in theological terms I think in Mere Christianity, if you ever want to look it up. I thought about the possibilities a lot when I was looking into Theistic Satanism. It seemed like some Satanists at least, were villainizing God while considering Satan to be their saviour! Considering the fact that Christians forget (forgive?) their God for all the terrible things he had the Israelites do to people in the O.T., good and bad are simply a part of both their mythologies. Who's to say which god you get, especially when you call out to the skies using such generic terms like "God" or "Satan"?? :)

The problem I have with Lewis, is that he wrote to a generation of people and their issues that I can't completely follow. Not knowing what he's arguing against, makes it difficult to follow his train of thought. Probably my favorite book is his allegorical story of his own journey called The Pilgrim's Regress. It's deep, like all his writings, and I get lost often on which philosophical mindset he's attacking when. I have the same problem though too with the last of the sci-fi books, That Hideous Strength, which I can barely follow.

I think I agree about God or Satan, you don't know who's going to answer your call, and, if you "call" when you're full of negativity, you may not get the being(s) you wanted/expected, if that make some sense.


Oh, and I just love this site dedicated to him!

Clive Staples Lewis has been perhaps the single most useful tool of Satan since his appearance in the Christian community...

here: (http://www.balaams-ass.com/JOURNAL/homemake/cslewis.htm)

They dedicate the whole site to bashing the guy for all the paganism he inserted into his writing, and perhaps even practiced in his life! If you can get past the negative tone it's all written in, it's awesome!

Apparently he saw Apollo as an early form of Christ, and could barely keep himself from worshiping Him when visiting Delphi... darn, I read this a long time ago and need to check it out again!

I'll have to check it out, that's really interesting about Lewis and Apollo, he definitely seems like quite a cool guy if that's true. I do like how he didn't demonize Gods of pre-Christian cultures, at least, to the best of my knowledge anyway.

The more I learn about him, the more I want to read some more of his works, especially his fiction.