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Nuadu
April 30th, 2010, 12:24 PM
Im a fan of outlaw country music and while I was listening to 'Im a good Ol' Rebel' recently I was surprised to hear the term 'reconstructed'. I was going to learn the song just cos of that line and my powerfull lust for an Irish neopaganism thats actually Irish but I thought Id check into its history before hand since I dont know anything about the American civil war and outlaw country can tackle some controversial subjects.

Im finding the research interesting and I was wondering if any recons generally being fans of history have looked at the term reconstruction and its role in American culture and considered its use in that light?

Regardless of recons many cultural focusses it is an american phenomanon and the term reconstruction with regards to neopaganism was coined by Americans. If its a word with meaning in the history and culture of the country shouldnt that meaning be important in an American innovation in Neopaganism?

Ailyn
April 30th, 2010, 03:59 PM
Hmm, Reconstruction of the South. No thanks, I live around too many rednecks as it is. Them and Amish. Yee-haw, farm-country! Where cow-tippin' is a celebrated past-time and its common to see horse-drawn buggies on the main roads (but they aren't allowed on the high-ways). Though, I guess I'm being slightly hypocritical, since I plan on joining the NRA and getting my CCP. NOOO, T-county takeover!

Seren_
April 30th, 2010, 05:13 PM
The word has many different nuances, really, and the term isn't confined to a subset of pagan religions specifically. In a pagan sense, though, its origins are attributed to Isaac Bonewits in the 1970s, being popularised by Margot Adler.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagan_reconstructionism

In that sense, the term has a specific meaning, referring to the methodology employed in the practice of one's religion. It's culturally focused, and emphasises the historical aspects of practice and belief, whilst reconciling those with modern society (where necessary).

I'm not really sure what that has to do with American history, to be honest...except in the loosest sense - i.e. the term apparently originated in America.

Tim
November 8th, 2010, 12:15 PM
I was watching a documentary a while back, and the title reconstructionist was used to describe historians who attempted to either restore or build copies of ancient devices, buildings, clothing, remedies, or whatever, using the descriptions in ancient texts to duplicate (as best as possible) ancient methods and using traditional materials. Like Polytheistic Reconstructionists, where information is lacking, these historians make educated guesses bases on facts known about the culture, and comparisons to similar cultures. I have no idea when this term started to be applied to this kind of historian, but it may be possible this is where Isaac Bonewits first acquired the word. However, I think it is apparent the phrase got away from Bonewits, who first used the term for what could better be described as constructionist Neopaganism, rather than the actual reconstruction of traditional indigenous religions.

mouseytalons
November 8th, 2010, 12:52 PM
The word has many different nuances, really, and the term isn't confined to a subset of pagan religions specifically. In a pagan sense, though, its origins are attributed to Isaac Bonewits in the 1970s, being popularised by Margot Adler.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pagan_reconstructionism

In that sense, the term has a specific meaning, referring to the methodology employed in the practice of one's religion. It's culturally focused, and emphasises the historical aspects of practice and belief, whilst reconciling those with modern society (where necessary).

I'm not really sure what that has to do with American history, to be honest...except in the loosest sense - i.e. the term apparently originated in America.

Thank You for the link. Between that and www.mirriam-webster.com/reconstructionism (http://www.mirriam-webster.com/reconstructionism) I got a pretty good picture of what they were talking about. From my understanding; this term does refer to practicing the ancient religions (including 1st century AD Judaism) in their historical and cultural contexts. I personally believe this is the best way to practice the beliefs of the ancients. I cannot understand how to practice my spirituality any other way, (makes no sense to worship the ancient Greek gods without the historical and cultural context.) Hope this helps, and Blessings on your research.:)