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Ailyn
June 20th, 2010, 01:35 AM
I was just curious on some common (or not) death rites, not directly related to Samhain. Like, what do you do when a relative dies? Does anyone know any lays or elegies? My cousin passed away today (massive heart failure, no previous heart conditions, 13 years old), and I'm bumming for this kid and his mom (she lost her first husband to cancer), and just trying to fairwell him in a good fashion (my private fairwell, not theirs, their having a Christian funeral). I don't take death well, and I'd like to come to terms with his in a spiritual fashion so I can really be there for his mom. Thanks.

odubhain
June 26th, 2010, 09:24 AM
I was just curious on some common (or not) death rites, not directly related to Samhain. Like, what do you do when a relative dies? Does anyone know any lays or elegies? My cousin passed away today (massive heart failure, no previous heart conditions, 13 years old), and I'm bumming for this kid and his mom (she lost her first husband to cancer), and just trying to fairwell him in a good fashion (my private fairwell, not theirs, their having a Christian funeral). I don't take death well, and I'd like to come to terms with his in a spiritual fashion so I can really be there for his mom. Thanks.

Celts generally considered that the spirit of a person could live on in another life as was said to have been taught by Druids (who were noted for their truth). Spirit can live in song, story, objects, places, people and even in entire families. Among Celts, spirit was invoked into almost every action. Death was not the end. The best way for your cousin to live on is to create a living memorial to them that calls forth images of who they were and who they still are. At funerals, the eulogy often served as a foundation for futire tales in which the departed could rejoing the living in their daily life, their rituals and their quiet times.

I don't think it was much different from what we do now, though I do think that the remembering was more a thing full of life and potential than is normally given to it in modern times.

Searles O'Dubhain