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View Full Version : What about Pluto?



BeautyQueen
June 22nd, 2010, 04:48 AM
I am not too good at astrology and my concepts are quite cloudy. Please help me understand why is Pluto kicked out of the solar system?

i would appreciate your help. Thanks in advance

faye_cat
June 22nd, 2010, 04:53 AM
Apparently, to scientists, size does matter.

:hahugh:

http://www.universetoday.com/2008/04/10/why-pluto-is-no-longer-a-planet/
http://science.howstuffworks.com/pluto-planet.htm
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/08/060824-pluto-planet.html

From the last link:


According to the new definition, a full-fledged planet is an object that orbits the sun and is large enough to have become round due to the force of its own gravity. In addition, a planet has to dominate the neighborhood around its orbit.
Pluto has been demoted because it does not dominate its neighborhood. Charon, its large "moon," is only about half the size of Pluto, while all the true planets are far larger than their moons.

Infinite Grey
June 22nd, 2010, 05:44 AM
I am not too good at astrology and my concepts are quite cloudy. Please help me understand why is Pluto kicked out of the solar system?

i would appreciate your help. Thanks in advance

1> Astrology has nothing to do with Pluto's stasis in the solar system beyond its own hocus pocus... Astronomy and various other Cosmological disciplines are the main authorities in this.

2> Pluto hasn't been kicked out of the solar system any more than celestial objects like Eris have been kicked out. It was merely reclassified as a Dwarf Planet - a necessary step as there wasn't really a comprehensive criteria for an object to considered a Planet; or in other words, Pluto and Eris do not share enough similarities with the other Terrestrial Planets to be considered the same sort of celestial body.

BeautyQueen
June 23rd, 2010, 04:53 AM
hey thanks for making myself clear :)

Daecon
June 23rd, 2010, 08:14 PM
The major difference besides size (Eris is larger), is the fact that Pluto's orbit is so unusual. It's orbit is out of the plane of the ecliptic, and so eccentric that it's sometimes inside of the orbit of Neptune. Because of this, Pluto seems to have more in common with the Kuiper belt comets than the standard planets. Even its rock and ice composition is reminiscent of a comet, although to be fair, Earth itself would have this same composition if it were placed in Pluto's orbit.

edit: Incidentally, Pluto's "demotion" doesn't have much effect on astrology. Uranus, Neptune and Pluto never featured prominently in horoscopes since they were never visible from Earth, and so never acquired associations from traditional astrology. Some astrologers include them for completeness, though.