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Kaylara
June 6th, 2001, 12:53 AM
I have found that a lot of people automatically assume that Pagan=Wiccan...

So, I want to discuss the difference between the two...

I think of it like this, Every Wiccan is Pagan, but not every Pagan is Wiccan...

Does anyone care to put their two cents in...

Kaylara

Earth Walker
June 6th, 2001, 12:59 AM
Pagans follow the ancient Goddess Traditions.
Wicca incorporates Goddess Traditions and mainstream
religions. IMHO

widukind
June 6th, 2001, 05:25 AM
Pagans can be either polytheistic or duotheistic, being believing in the Gods, or in only the God and Goddess. 'Pagan' is a collective term for anyone who does not follow a mainstream religion like Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism or Islam.

Brightest Blessings!

Widukind

Kiya
June 6th, 2001, 06:56 AM
Some people consider that Pagan religions encompass all religions that believe that a higher power/deity is within everything in the physical universe and 'of' it, and non-Pagan religions believe that the deity is apart from the physical universe, and not 'of' it.

Which would basically mean that only Christianity, Judaism and Islam are non-Pagan... Hinduism, Buddhism, Wicca, Druid, etc etc would all be Pagan.

I'll try and dig out where I read that, it's quite interesting.

Kiya

Emerald Sky
June 6th, 2001, 11:03 AM
Paganism would be the over-all belief, and Wicca is one "flavor" of it. Just like Christian is the over-all belief and Catholic is one type of Christian religion.

Rick
June 6th, 2001, 05:36 PM
I thought from the thread title that this was, like, the Tag Team Title match. :D

Sorry... I'll just quietly excuse myself, now...

Dria El
June 6th, 2001, 05:56 PM
Christian is to Catholic as Pagan is to Wiccan.

Emerald Sky
June 6th, 2001, 07:11 PM
Originally posted by Rick
I thought from the thread title that this was, like, the Tag Team Title match. :D

Sorry... I'll just quietly excuse myself, now...



LOL!!!8O

Reeny
June 6th, 2001, 09:37 PM
Paganism is a broad term that encompasses nature base goddess
religions. However, all pagans aren't wiccan and all witches aren't wiccan. Paganism is like a zesty pot of soup it nourishes all that feeds upon it!

Mairwen
June 6th, 2001, 10:37 PM
and not all pagans are witches, either.

eaglewolf
June 6th, 2001, 10:49 PM
...and not all Wiccans are witches....

Sorry, there was a kinda theme goin' there...

;)

~ew

widukind
June 7th, 2001, 05:14 AM
Hi Reeny,



Paganism is a broad term that encompasses nature base goddess
religions. However, all pagans aren't wiccan and all witches aren't wiccan. Paganism is like a zesty pot of soup it nourishes all that feeds upon it!


I'm wondering... do you consider Druidism to be non-Pagan, or a Goddess-based religion? :confused:

Brightest Blessings!

Widukind

Emy
June 7th, 2001, 05:25 AM
Originally posted by eaglewolf
...and not all Wiccans are witches....


:)

Well I usually say not all witches are wiccans,
but all wiccans are witches...

but perhaps I'm wrong?


B*B

bluecat
June 7th, 2001, 05:36 AM
Also, to add to the Pagan Soup, there are folks like myself who do not have any Gods or Goddesses. Although I believe the Universe itself is the Supreme Being and I am simply a part of the greater whole, I do not give it any kind of form, it simply exists.

Blue :cool:

Mairwen
June 7th, 2001, 12:05 PM
Originally posted by widukind
Hi Reeny,
I'm wondering... do you consider Druidism to be non-Pagan, or a Goddess-based religion? :confused:
Brightest Blessings!
Widukind

Um ... Trying to figure out how Druidry could be non-Pagan ....

Revelation
June 7th, 2001, 12:43 PM
Erm....

Not all pagan worship a Goddess. There are plenty of pagan religions which are in no way Goddess centered. Asatru, Druidism, Shamanism come to mind.

Not all Wiccans are witches and vice versa. One can practice the religion of Wicca without ever working magic or practicing the art of witchcraft. Just because a person calls themself Wiccan doesn't mean they are a witch. That's a rather lofty title to bestow upon beginners.


Wicca incorporates Goddess Traditions and mainstream
religions.

Now this I find very interesting, and not far-fetched, either. Wiccans like to give Christianity and Judaism hell, but there are some fairly strong Judeo-Christian elements in Wicca, though many will deny this until the cows come home.

Gardner was an interesting fellow. Have to give him his due.

Kaylara
June 7th, 2001, 12:51 PM
Well, I have to agree, Gardner was something... (I am not even going to go there)

Kaylara

Mairwen
June 7th, 2001, 01:08 PM
Originally posted by Revelation
Not all pagan worship a Goddess. There are plenty of pagan religions which are in no way Goddess centered. Asatru, Druidism, Shamanism come to mind.

Um ... Some Druidry is Goddess-centered. K?


That's a rather lofty title to bestow upon beginners.

According to whom? Why? That's a little harsh, don't you think?


Gardner was an interesting fellow. Have to give him his due.

I'm with Kaylara. I'm not going there, either.

Revelation
June 7th, 2001, 01:24 PM
What's harsh about saying "witch" is a lofty title for beginners? I dont think that's harsh at all. I think the term denotes someone of some study, some "experience". Thats in no way condescending. That's reserving credit for where credit is due. (I, for the record, am not a witch.)

Ok, so some Druidry is Goddess-centered. A lot of it ain't.

Mairwen
June 7th, 2001, 01:33 PM
Originally posted by Revelation
What's harsh about saying "witch" is a lofty title for beginners?

Well, that may be true for you or a particular path. But some witches don't have a proscribed path, and not all pagans are witches, etc and so forth. That was my point.


Ok, so some Druidry is Goddess-centered. A lot of it ain't.

No, a lot of it isn't, but it's not fair to come along and say, "Druidry isn't Goddess centered" because you're making a blanket statement ~ and that's not cool. :rolleyes:

Revelation
June 7th, 2001, 01:37 PM
Well, that may be true for you or a particular path. But some witches don't have a proscribed path, and not all pagans are
witches, etc and so forth. That was my point.

*Thumps himself in the head* And a very valid point it is. My mistake.

bluecat
June 7th, 2001, 02:00 PM
I think we should be careful telling someone they can or cannot be called something, it sounds a bit elitist. Even if a person is new to a path, if it is there calling, then So Be It. We were all new to our paths at one time.

Blue

MystyPines
June 7th, 2001, 02:20 PM
Ugh! I am so confused, he he he. Okay I have been on "the path" for a long time now and consider myself Pagan, Wiccan and Witch and use them interchangeably. Now, a description as it was explained to me long ago, was like this, think of Paganism as the Tree and Wicca being one of its branches. But to this day, I still have not been told what the differences in the 2 would be? As in Christianity being a Tree and its branches being Catholic, Protestant, Episcopal (sp?). I know some of differences in these faiths, some have communion and penance, some have saints and some not. But could someone tell me or make a list, of what the differences in being Pagan and then being Wiccan? :smash:

Bright Blessings!

Mairwen
June 7th, 2001, 02:25 PM
For example: I'm definitely a Pagan. However, the Path I follow is the Gwyddoniad; I am, therefore, a Gwyddon. Same follows with Wicca ~ it's a branch of the Pagan tree. You're apparently a Pagan on the Wiccan Path, right? I like that tree analogy! :D

Did that help at all? :confused:

MystyPines
June 7th, 2001, 02:47 PM
Mairwen, you are so sweet!!! he he he.

Okay, so let me get this straight, he he he, so you are Pagan, and your "tradition" is Gwyddon. So now we are talking about the Tree, its branches, and now Gwyddon would be the Buds or Blooms. I follow a Celtic pantheon and use the Gardnerian structure for ritual. So, let's see, I guess my question is, are Wiccans and Pagans beliefs are the same? And, if not, what are the differences? Do both believe in Gods and Goddesses of various pantheons (some believe just God or Goddess and some revere many), do they both celebrate the 8 Sabbats, Full Moons, etc., do they both do spellwork, do they all incorporate the directions/elements/guardians/quarters/archangels, I still don't know the difference. Are the differences in the way the do ritual or the holidays we celebrate?

Mairwen
June 7th, 2001, 02:54 PM
Originally posted by MystyPines
Mairwen, you are so sweet!!! he he he.
Okay, so let me get this straight, he he he, so you are Pagan, and your "tradition" is Gwyddon. So now we are talking about the Tree, its branches, and now Gwyddon would be the Buds or Blooms.

Yup.


So, let's see, I guess my question is, are Wiccans and Pagans beliefs are the same?

Not necessarily. There are some similarities, but the differences usually out weigh any sameness. Because "Pagan" itself isn't a "path", per se. Like being a witch, who doesn't necessarily have a path, you can be a Pagan and not necessarily have a set path, either. K?


And, if not, what are the differences?

I'd be hard pressed to make a list ~ it'd be more a volume, because each is so different. Some do this, some do that, some do something else. It'd be hard to put all of that here.

Revelation
June 7th, 2001, 02:54 PM
I think we should be careful telling someone they can or cannot be called something, it sounds a bit elitist.

It is elistist. I also think degree systems are elitist. I also don't think that is a bad thing.

For MystyPines, poor dear.

Wicca is a special *kind* of Paganism. Paganism is an umbrella term: it encompasses many beliefs, many religions. In fact. you'll be hard pressed to get two people to agree on what Paganism is. There are so many different definitions out there.

So your question "do they believe the same thing" is very hard to answer.

Are you familiar at all with Christianity? There are many *kinds* of Christians: Baptist, Episcopalians, Catholics, etc. They are all CHristian because they adhere to a certain core belief structure, but they have many differences between them.

Likewise with paganism and Wicca. Paganism encompasses many systems: Wicca, Druidiry, Shamnism, Asatru, Dianic Witchcraft, etc. These religions have things in common, but there are many differences between them.

A very good site to look at at learn about this differences in pagan religions is www.religioustolerance.org

I hope you find what you are looking for.

-Mike

MystyPines
June 7th, 2001, 03:24 PM
Thanks Revelation!!!!!

:D

oskila
June 7th, 2001, 05:21 PM
'Pagan' derives from latin 'paganus' and means 'heathen'. I think paganus originally meant farmer. The farmers far away from the city of Rome didn't worship the roman gods.

Walach
June 7th, 2001, 05:43 PM
Probably some of the reasons for these differences maybe culture, placing and opinion. I heard someone say once, Opinions are like belly buttons everyone has one. I think it's the same for Pagan beliefs, or the use of these beliefs which encompass a huge range of people. I am glad to say that in my mind Pagan is a "religion" of the utmost grace, It holds so many types of people when they would be thrown from other religions. The world, the universe, all understood, (I say that loosely) by the pagan "religion". I have looked pagan up in the dictionary, told me to go to heathen and then it said, Somone who does not follow Christianity....Blah Blah Blah, It had four there can't remember which four. I then wondered why these four have such a high role and why everything other than these is pagan/heathen and why did they make it this way.

Just another thing, This is my first post here so Hello!

bluecat
June 7th, 2001, 06:40 PM
Originally posted by oskila
'Pagan' derives from latin 'paganus' and means 'heathen'. I think paganus originally meant farmer. The farmers far away from the city of Rome didn't worship the roman gods.

That is it, peasant farmers, etc who did not follow the "official" gods of Rome.

Blue

Dria El
June 7th, 2001, 11:18 PM
Originally posted by Walach

Just another thing, This is my first post here so Hello!

Welcome to the boards Walach! Glad to see you've joined us! :)

Reeny
June 9th, 2001, 04:43 AM
Hi Widukind and Mairwen!


Yes, Druidism is a pagan religion. And there are some Druid groups that worship goddesses. Druidism evolved from the Celtic culture. And The Celtics worshiped many goddesses.

Reeny!

widukind
June 9th, 2001, 05:05 AM
Okay, I was just making sure.

But it's kinda sad everyone automatically assumes Pagan = Wiccan, but how can they be blamed when there's so much on tv about it?

Ita est The Craft, Charmed, Sabrina the Teenage Witch (although it's a farce, really)

Brightest Blessings!

Widukind

Walach
June 9th, 2001, 08:34 AM
You can get a lot of information from tv programs, But you have to cieve (sp) through all the useless junk that makes tv so...well boring.

Jamie
June 10th, 2001, 12:35 PM
'Pagan' derives from latin 'paganus' and means 'heathen'. I think paganus originally meant farmer. The farmers far away from the city of Rome didn't worship the roman gods.


Actually, paganus means 'country dweller' :)

Lucidia
June 12th, 2001, 07:04 PM
hmmm

i'm not anything in particular.. i don't follow anything that's written down unless i wrote it.... heh.

am i pagan? perhaps. but i'm not wiccan... and i don't think all pagans should be assumed to be wiccan. Wicca is a path... being pagan just points out that you are on a path other than a mainstream religious path. in my opinion that is.

mol
June 13th, 2001, 11:58 PM
I think (sometimes) people put too much effort in defining their label than focusing on their Path.

Call me what you want. I know who I am.

Rick
June 14th, 2001, 08:46 AM
Originally posted by mol
I think (sometimes) people put too much effort in defining their label than focusing on their Path.

Call me what you want. I know who I am.

Ok, then, I'm gonna call you... Bobby (after a small plant I used to have. Bobby died tragically. He got depressed & refused to take water...).

Skye
June 27th, 2001, 03:10 PM
Originally posted by mol

Call me what you want. I know who I am.

I really like that.

Would you mind if I use your words in future conversations about what I believe?

BrigitCayenne
June 27th, 2001, 03:43 PM
Pagan is a general term for earth religion
Wicca is just one earth religion

Skye
June 27th, 2001, 03:52 PM
Originally posted by BrigitCayenne
Pagan is a general term for earth religion
Wicca is just one earth religion

nto really, Pagan is a more general term for country dweller, and not all pagans are earth religion based

Mairwen
June 27th, 2001, 04:24 PM
Originally posted by BrigitCayenne
Pagan is a general term for earth religion
Wicca is just one earth religion

I have said this before, and I'll say this again.

Not everyone who is Pagan follows an earth-centered Path.

Thank you.

Maia
July 9th, 2001, 03:52 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
'Pagan' derives from latin 'paganus' and means 'heathen'. I think paganus originally meant farmer. The farmers far away from the city of Rome didn't worship the roman gods.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Actually, paganus means 'country dweller'

mmm, i hate to be picky, but 'paganus', whilst meaning 'country-dweller', was a derogatory term, kinda like 'redneck' or 'hick'.


and as for the thing about farmers outside of rome not worshipping the roman gods...people all over the 'known' world worshipped the roman gods after their assimilation into the roman empire - living a few miles off the beaten track didn't stop anyone honouring their gods; *especially* those to whom they were indigenous.

i guess it depends on ur point of view.

eudaimonia
maia xxx

ladyrowan
July 9th, 2001, 04:28 PM
Pagan is also a ruined city on the Irrawaddy river in Burma, founded 849AD, was capital of the Pagan dynasty.
Mainly Buddhist, it's still a centre of pilgrimage and an important architectural site!

Sorry, got slightly off the point there! hehe

Myst
July 11th, 2001, 03:11 AM
Originally posted by Jamie


Actually, paganus means 'country dweller' :)

"heathen \Hea"then\ (?; 277), n.; pl. Heathensor collectively Heathen. [OE. hethen, AS. h??en, prop. an adj. fr. h?? heath, and orig., therefore, one who lives in the country or on the heaths and in the woods (cf. pagan, fr. pagus village"

so does heathen, goober :) ;) 8O :D :p

go ahead, spend all day arguing over the dictionary definitions of terms...

bluecat
July 11th, 2001, 12:50 PM
You are both right about the pagan and heathen thing. Let's not sit around arguing over what the dictionary says though. I have used such definitions to show what the world has to work on for those words. Many people do not even know how to use a dictionary though and you would be sadly surprised at how many families with school age children do not have a dictionary in their homes (I digress).

Anyway, let's not get all hung up over this.

Blue

Loki
July 11th, 2001, 01:12 PM
For the lack of a better term I call myself Pagan.
I have not yet defined any part of what it is I am following.
Maybe I never will?!
But does it really matter?????


I just keep stumbling along. :)

Myst
July 12th, 2001, 01:54 AM
I just use dictionary.com

Sorry if I sounded harsh, I was just trying to make a joke over the silliness of it all. Here, let's stumble together, Loki :)

Shy Hawk
July 13th, 2001, 01:40 AM
I always get to the conversations late...I've said it before and I'll say it again....I'm no Wiccan. I am a Pagan...
There's no point it saying what they both are again...I think it's been defined really quite well.
ShyHawk

PS Rick is hilarious.

Mairwen
July 13th, 2001, 08:18 PM
I agree ShyHawk. On both counts. :D

Shy Hawk
July 13th, 2001, 11:42 PM
Thanks.:D

loopy
October 4th, 2001, 06:09 PM
*bump*

Sora
October 4th, 2001, 06:30 PM
Ack. I'm butting in, yes? But anyways, I absolutely hate it when people come after me with Wiccan questions, I mean, calling me Wiccan or Witch. I'm not, I'm a pagan, and though I have nothing against them, I'm just not a Wiccan. I think Wiccan is a spin off, a modern spin off, of paganism...

I'm confusing myself, ranting like this...

Darkfire Paladyn
December 16th, 2003, 02:56 PM
Hey...I was doing a school assignment about a month ago, and I explored this and a few other sites. The assignment is finished, but I was still curious about the main differences between Wiccan and Paganism (sorry if any of this is politically incorrect). Would someone mind filling me in? I'd very much appreciate it.

Ash StormRaven
December 16th, 2003, 06:50 PM
I condider myself both Wiccan and Pagan. In saying this I wish to elaborate. I believe in the male/femal aspects of nature and I use the symbol of the God and Goddess to symbolize this and for use in worship and ritual. Also, I believe that one can use different aspects of the God and Goddess to represent different parts of nature in regards to what the God or Goddess symbolizes. So I worship the God and Goddess as symbols of the Oneness that is created by their harmony, I practice magick in accordance with the moon and the elements and all aspects of nature. Therefore, I consider myself Pagan and Wiccan -- Pagan is my religion and Green Wicca being my path.

Selkis
December 18th, 2003, 04:02 AM
Very interesting thread this.

Also I think that Wicca is a religion such as most christian ones, with simular structures and herachies.
Whereas paganism is a form of life founded by nature itself.

When I started studying paganism, I was delighted to have found others who felt and lived alike. I then came onto the topic of Wicca, and saw a (please forgive, "to me" ) simple religion like any other. Wicca didn't seem earthbound, they led a standart american life, (make-up, over-weight, plastic- and fast food lovers) had their regular church-like meetings.

A pagan was in my mind someone living in unity with nature, respecting and appreciating such, respecting and feeling the spirits, celebrating such in ones own way, restoring ones energy and seeking balance within oneself, with others and most of all with nature itself.
And I thought that just like me, any pagen was "moon-baving" during the full moon, and was exchanging energy with another, was finding answers in such nights and days, and had a deep relationship with the moon.

I then learned that pagens follow fixed dates of celebration, had names for various 'gods', and were again in some form organised.

So I came to the point that I was really a "nothing". I would also call myself a heathen.
I respect the moon, the spirits, feel them, see and feel people, practise certain rituals, but all such comes naturally. It is just the way I am, and have been most of my life.
A few people think I was a witch, that is not true, since I can not achieve all spells or healings, only a few come naturally.

It is very difficult to give something a label.

SylverStar
December 18th, 2003, 07:42 AM
Wow this thread is old.

Selkis I like wat you said. I've read books on all these subjects but I still feel what comes natural to me is best. I'll be a "nothing" right along with you (unless we're talking about the nothing from Never Ending Story :) ).

Morag Elasaid Ni Dhomhnaill
December 18th, 2003, 11:47 AM
Very interesting thread this.

Also I think that Wicca is a religion such as most christian ones, with simular structures and herachies.
Whereas paganism is a form of life founded by nature itself.

When I started studying paganism, I was delighted to have found others who felt and lived alike. I then came onto the topic of Wicca, and saw a (please forgive, "to me" ) simple religion like any other. Wicca didn't seem earthbound, they led a standart american life, (make-up, over-weight, plastic- and fast food lovers) had their regular church-like meetings.

A pagan was in my mind someone living in unity with nature, respecting and appreciating such, respecting and feeling the spirits, celebrating such in ones own way, restoring ones energy and seeking balance within oneself, with others and most of all with nature itself.
And I thought that just like me, any pagen was "moon-baving" during the full moon, and was exchanging energy with another, was finding answers in such nights and days, and had a deep relationship with the moon.

I then learned that pagens follow fixed dates of celebration, had names for various 'gods', and were again in some form organised.

So I came to the point that I was really a "nothing". I would also call myself a heathen.
I respect the moon, the spirits, feel them, see and feel people, practise certain rituals, but all such comes naturally. It is just the way I am, and have been most of my life.
A few people think I was a witch, that is not true, since I can not achieve all spells or healings, only a few come naturally.

It is very difficult to give something a label.

I actually have to disagree with a lot of what you said here, Selkis. My perception is quite different. A pagan, by definition is two things - 1)Someone who does not follow one of the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Though there are others, such as Hindus, Buddhists, and followers of Zorastrinism that would probably be insulted at being called such. 2)A pejorative word for a country-dweller who continued to follow the older folk-religions. When Christianity become the main religion of the Roman Empire, calling someone a pagan would be like calling someone else a hick or redneck now. Similar to the Norse heathen (one who lives in the heath).

There are various other definitions that can be used, such as a hedonist or one who worships false idols or one who has no religion at all, however the two I listed above are the definitions most commonly used when you are using the term pagan.

The definition you gave of being someone who is a nature lover, etc. has much more to do with Neo-Paganism, which is really something quite different. Neo-paganism is a modern day attempt to recreate, as well as create fully in the case of Wicca, those older folk-religions I mentioned. Neo-Pagans do tend to be tree-huggers, poly/duotheistic, and use magic - usually only for the benefit of themselves and if it harms none, though that is not the case for all Neo-Pagans. (BTW, I'm leaving Reconstructionists out of my definition of Neo-Pagans, as I am more inclined to call them Pagans, or put them in a separate group alltogether.)

Also, you say that Pagans followed fixed days of celebration, which I also have to disagree with. It is simply inaccurate to say that all Pagans celebrated the same fixed days. First of all many didn't follow an exact calendar so any feast days they did celebrate were certainly not fixed but instead subject to seasonal changes. Others, such as the Romans (though don't take me completely without a grain of salt - I'm not an expert on Roman religion) feast days were slightly more fixed and did regularly celebrate such feasts as Saturnalia. But to say that they all celebrated on fixed days would be incorrect.

Neo-Pagans on the other hand do tend to have fixed days of celebration, usually the same ones that Wiccans celebrate (Samhain, the Winter Solstice, Imbolg, Vernal Equinox, Beltaine, Summer Solstice, Lughnassadh, and the Autumnal Equinox). Though I'm sure there are those that don't really celebrate those either.

I would also say that to claim all pagans worshipped gods is incorrect. Many were simply animists or participated in some sort of ancestor worship and left gods out of the equation.

Most Neo-Pagans these days due to tend to all worship some form of the Divine, whether they be mono/poly/duotheistic. I really don't know of any Neo-Pagans who participate in ancestor worship, though I could be wrong. And I'm sure there are a few who would classify themselves as animists rather than theistic.


Hey...I was doing a school assignment about a month ago, and I explored this and a few other sites. The assignment is finished, but I was still curious about the main differences between Wiccan and Paganism (sorry if any of this is politically incorrect). Would someone mind filling me in? I'd very much appreciate it.

I think I explained pretty well above the differences between Pagans and Neo-Pagans. Now to address your question about Wiccans. Wicca is simply a branch of Neo-Paganism created by Gerald Gardner about half a century ago. Wicca is to Neo-Paganism what Christianity, Judaism, or Islam is to the Abrahamic Religions. It then breaks down further into traditions, much like Christianity breaks down into denominations (Catholic, Presbyterian, Methodist, etc.), or Islam breaks into the Suffis and Sunnis, and I believe Judaism breaks down further as well (Orthodox, etc.).

Hope I answered your question and that I didn't step on anyone's toes.

~Saoirse Aiyana

Selkis
December 18th, 2003, 12:00 PM
Thank you very much for your thorough reply, Saoirse Aiyana
Very interesting and informative.
It looks like there is a lot for me to learn on here.

You mentioned "tree-huggers" <shy> , I do actually give my plants strokes and cuddles. I always thought I was the only one (especially with my cactii). :)

I shall read your reply again before I comment.
One thing though, with my reply I was not refering to the pagens of old times, but of present pagan movements, and my observations of such.
But, yes, I am learnig a bit more with every day.

Thank you again,

Morag Elasaid Ni Dhomhnaill
December 18th, 2003, 12:06 PM
~smiles~ I figured as much, that' why I differentiated the terms Pagan and Neo-Pagan, because they are rightly two different things. The Pagan religions that are still extant (Aboriginal, Shinto, the various forms of Native American spiritualities, etc.) are really quite different than modern Neo-Paganism so I think it's very important to be clear as to which you are referring.

As for being a tree-hugger I mean that with all kindness. I see nothing wrong with it and have been known to talk to trees myself, though I do refrain from actually hugging them. I prefer to just rest a hand on them when I converse with the spirits that inhabit them.

~Saoirse Aiyana