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Williwaw
August 10th, 2003, 06:22 PM
Well I finally did it! I made my first batch of homemade soap. I decided to start out with olive oil castille soap. I think it turned out well, but I guess I'll find out in a few weeks. I did have a hard time seeing the trailings, but I've read that's common with olive oil.

Now in a few weeks it will be ready to be milled, I'm needing ideas for additives. So...any ideas? :)

Thanks!
Gina

Lavender
August 11th, 2003, 04:16 AM
Congrats on your first batch! Olive oil soap is usually hard for people to make as the first batch. Olive oil soap is great for just about anything. It's so gentle and mild. But the only thing it doesn't work well with is moulding it...as it is a very soft soap.

You can make shampoo or liquid soap with it. Grate about 1 cup of soap and add that to 2 cups of water. Let it sit on low heat until soap has melted. Scrunch the pieces down but don't stir. Once the mixture has melted and has cooled down a bit, add in your favourite essential oils. Rosemary is great for shiney hair.

We have a couple of old soap making threads kicking around here.

Xander67
August 11th, 2003, 03:21 PM
good luck willow, let us know how it came out~!

Williwaw
August 12th, 2003, 10:49 PM
Well so far so good. I had to stir the oil which floated to the top back into the soap twice per day for the first day and a half, but it's now completely mixed and it's starting to firm up nicely. How fun! I can see how this can become addicting.

I think for the first batch of milling we're going to make half with crushed almonds and some sweet almond oil, and the other half of the batch we'll add tea tree oil to.

I also have lots of mint. Do I need to dry the mint before using it??

Gina

Lavender
August 13th, 2003, 02:00 AM
Oh definitely dry the mint (or any botanicals) before using. If you're doing remilling, there is less chance of it turning brown like in regular CP soap. Just curious about the recipe you used...it shouldn't have the oil separating unless the lye was too low or not mixed in completely. If the recipe had a very low lye discount, adding sweet almond oil may cause your soap to go rancid in the future.

~*Ginger*~
August 13th, 2003, 07:12 AM
Williwaw,
This group has lots of recipes...
Bundle of Scrolls (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bundle_of_scrolls/)

Williwaw
August 13th, 2003, 11:11 PM
Oh definitely dry the mint (or any botanicals) before using. If you're doing remilling, there is less chance of it turning brown like in regular CP soap. Just curious about the recipe you used...it shouldn't have the oil separating unless the lye was too low or not mixed in completely. If the recipe had a very low lye discount, adding sweet almond oil may cause your soap to go rancid in the future.

The recipe was:

52 oz olive oil
7 oz lye
20 oz cold water

The instructions said to pour into the primary mold and insulate as usual but that the olive oil will rise to the surface and it should be stirred back in 2 x per day over the first 48 hours. I did stir it back in and now we're at day 4 and it's quite solid and it's not at all separated. So far I think it's turned out great, I plan to cut it Fri or Sat.

Gina

Williwaw
August 13th, 2003, 11:14 PM
Williwaw,
This group has lots of recipes...
Bundle of Scrolls (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bundle_of_scrolls/)

Thanks for the link, I joined the group.

Gina

Lavender
August 15th, 2003, 04:39 PM
Just checked your lye and oil and it works out to 0% discount so it should be good to add extra oils to make it more gentle.

That's a lot of soap. What are you going to make with it? I love castile soap. They're great by themselves or rebatched into liquid shampoo. And gentle enough for baby soap too.

Williwaw
August 15th, 2003, 05:53 PM
Just checked your lye and oil and it works out to 0% discount so it should be good to add extra oils to make it more gentle.

That's a lot of soap. What are you going to make with it? I love castile soap. They're great by themselves or rebatched into liquid shampoo. And gentle enough for baby soap too.

Thanks for checking on that for me! BTW, how do you check that? I'm very new to all this so I really don't have a clue. I have cut the bars from the primary mold and they look terrific! I'm so excited that my first batch worked out.

Since it's my first I'm probably going to mill some of it into the almond soap and we'll have a supply of that around the house.
Other than that I haven't decided yet. I think I might start a second batch tonight. If it goes well I might just start making up holiday gift baskets. :)

Oh I do have another question. When adding things such as cucumber puree what keeps it from spoiling?? Is benzoin powder necessary?

Thanks!
Gina

Ravensnest
August 20th, 2003, 08:11 PM
The recipe was:

52 oz olive oil
7 oz lye
20 oz cold water

The instructions said to pour into the primary mold and insulate as usual but that the olive oil will rise to the surface and it should be stirred back in 2 x per day over the first 48 hours. I did stir it back in and now we're at day 4 and it's quite solid and it's not at all separated. So far I think it's turned out great, I plan to cut it Fri or Sat.

Gina


Personally I think that's a little lye heavy and I've never stirred my oils in again after I've poured them into the mold. If you reach a good trace you shouldn't need to stir anything in again in fact within a day you shouldn't be able to stir anything back in. The soap should (even with castile) be hard enough to remove from the mold within 24-48 hours tops. If it were me I'd have done
52oz Olive Oil
6.5 Lye
15oz water (this is taking a discount on the water.. whether I do cp or cpop soap I discount the water.. it helps it to cure faster)

And there's no reason you can't add your additives when you make the soap instead of remilling. When you hit trace add any additives you like. I've used calendula petals (for their healing properties) and oatmeal to my castile bars even goat's milk.

It is exciting to make that first batch of soap! And even more exciting when you actually use that first bar and get your first bubbles! Good luck!

Dottie
http://ravensnestincense.com
Ravens Nest Incense & Oils

Williwaw
August 22nd, 2003, 12:38 AM
Personally I think that's a little lye heavy and I've never stirred my oils in again after I've poured them into the mold. If you reach a good trace you shouldn't need to stir anything in again in fact within a day you shouldn't be able to stir anything back in. The soap should (even with castile) be hard enough to remove from the mold within 24-48 hours tops. If it were me I'd have done
52oz Olive Oil
6.5 Lye
15oz water (this is taking a discount on the water.. whether I do cp or cpop soap I discount the water.. it helps it to cure faster)

And there's no reason you can't add your additives when you make the soap instead of remilling. When you hit trace add any additives you like. I've used calendula petals (for their healing properties) and oatmeal to my castile bars even goat's milk.

It is exciting to make that first batch of soap! And even more exciting when you actually use that first bar and get your first bubbles! Good luck!

Dottie


Thanks for the info! :) I went by the recipe and direction in the book that I bought, I didn't know I could put in additives during the inital phase.

I did try to mill some of my first batch into cocoa butter soap, but it was a dismal failure. :eyebro: First, the soap would not melt down. I tried it for almost 2 hours and it still would not liquify. So it was a gloppy mess and I'm going to toss that batch.

This weekend I'm going to try once again to remelt the castile and add oatmeal & cinammon, and another batch with lavender.

Any ideas on why it wouldn't remelt??

Gina
http://ravensnestincense.com
Ravens Nest Incense & Oils

Ravensnest
August 22nd, 2003, 04:07 PM
Hey Gina,
Did you cut it up into small pieces? The best is if you have a salad shooter you can grate it in. Add a little water or goat's milk to it and then either use the stove or the oven to melt it. In the oven it might take a couple of hours to fully melt. Once it's melted it will not be as smooth as it was when you made it initially but, it will be smooth enough to pour.

As to additives yes, you can add them at light trace. I add my goats milk then to keep from having that cat piss smell it gives otherwise lol and anything else you wish to add may be added then.

My favorite form of soapmaking is CPOP because it has all the benefits of CP soap but, the fast cure time to take care of my impatience lol You make it just like you would CP but, discount the water 20-30%, pour into a lined wooden mold and pop into the oven at 150-175* for an hour and a half. Turn it off and let sit overnight. The next day you can unmold it and actually use it right away or you can let it set for an extra week or two if you want it harder. Great if you don't have the patience to wait 6-8 weeks cure time for regular CP soap.

Tons of fun and sooooo addictive!
Dottie

Williwaw
August 23rd, 2003, 12:12 AM
Hi!
I actually did use my salad shooter to grate the soap. :lol: That worked great, I added 9 oz of water initially but it just never liquified. It turned into the consistance of canned frosting or something similar. I added extra water even, but nothing happened. I might have to invest in those wooden molds and give that a try.

I'm going to start a new batch here in a few minutes and see what happens this time. Wish me luck! :eyebro:

Gina

Ravensnest
August 24th, 2003, 02:13 PM
Good luck and if you need any help just email me! I'll do what I can :)

Williwaw
August 24th, 2003, 09:17 PM
Good luck and if you need any help just email me! I'll do what I can :)

Well same problem. The soap will not liquify. It gets to the consistency of petroleum jelly and that's it. It simply refuses to thin out. I did add my oatmeal and cinnamon and then I "spread" it into the molds.

I wish I knew what the problem was. I'm now frustrated and not sure what to try next.

Gina

Ravensnest
August 26th, 2003, 10:16 PM
Hey Gina,
How are you rebatching? Are you using the oven, stove, microwave? What temp are you heating the soap at? Are you using bags to keep the soap in or are you rebatching directly into the pot? I need answers and then I might be able to help :)

Williwaw
August 28th, 2003, 01:31 AM
Hey Gina,
How are you rebatching? Are you using the oven, stove, microwave? What temp are you heating the soap at? Are you using bags to keep the soap in or are you rebatching directly into the pot? I need answers and then I might be able to help :)

Ok what I'm doing is what I read to do from the book, so I can only assume it's the right way. :eyebro:

I made my initial batch of olive oil soap back on the 10th. It set up pretty nicely, I dried it on a rack for good air flow, and I cut it a week later. I grated a few bars of the soap (I used the measurements in the book) into a pan I added the required amount of water and I slowly heated it up on the stovetop. I'd stir occasionally to prevent scorching, and I'd continue to do this for over an hour, but it would never liquify. At 150 degrees the soap was still at petroleum jelly consistency, so I tried a little longer and at 160 it was the same. :sadeyes:

That's what I've tried twice now and I've had the same result each time. Any idea what the problem is? Thanks so much for all your help, I really appreciate it!

Gina

Ravensnest
August 28th, 2003, 06:45 PM
Okay Gina.. here's what I do though I don't rebatch often as I add things to the soap as I make it. But, when using an oil that seizes I will rebatch or Hot Process instead of doing it straight CP.

When rebatching I grate my soap and then add a quarter cup to a half cup of fluid (usually goats milk or water but, you could use wine, beer, tea those sorts of things) to my grated soap and then I let it soak for an hour or so, stirring every now and then to make sure all of the soap absorbs the fluid. Then I put it in a crock pot or on the stove and let it cook on a low temp continuing to stir now and then. It will never melt down to the same consistency it was when you first made it. It will be much thicker than it was then. But, it should get to the point that you can pour it into a mold. The petroleum jelly stage your talking about sounds like you're getting pretty close to what you're looking for. Once it hits that point you can pour it into new molds and let it sit up then you'll have to let it sit for a few weeks to get hard. How long it sits depends on how much liquid it still has in it to get rid of. I think you're looking for it to be much like it was when you first made it and it's not going to get that "liquid". My bet is if you poured what you're getting into molds you'd end up with nice soaps.

But, the best thing is to just make your CP/CPOP/HP soap and not rebatch. Rebatching also leaves you more susceptible to bacteria and mold than your regular method does. Again, just food for thought.