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13thChylde
August 11th, 2003, 02:02 PM
My daughter had her annual dr's appointment last week. She is 7 yo and weighs 78 lbs. She's always been big for age, and she is tall. Over the past year though, she has gained weight faster, and I'm really concerned that she is addicted to carbos. She eats and eats and then says she's starving. And I've noticed that she becomes really tired and irritable after we eat out (where she has her "usual" - chicken fingers and french fries). She has quite a few tummy aches, also.

I found a book called Carbohydrate Addicted Kids...hopefully there will be some tips in there on how to wean her off of them. So I'm going to read that and see where we go from there. It really makes me mad though, b/c when you take your kids to a restaurant all they have offered are foods that are pretty bad for their systems, and if they buy lunch at school, their choices aren't much better. Today they could eat a steak biscuit or corn dog nuggets - ugh.

Anyone else going thru this?

Phoenix Blue
August 11th, 2003, 02:15 PM
hopefully there will be some tips in there on how to wean her off of them.

:eyebrow: Stop cooking them for her?

VelvetBlade
August 11th, 2003, 02:18 PM
I have a daughter who's gone through the same thing. She is now 13 and overweight. She lives with her dad, and no matter how many times I tell him that he CAN'T allow her to....she gets to LIVE on pasta with butter, cereal and junk food. She eats no meat, no veggies, no fruit...NOTHING. And it's fully because she's been allowed to do so. I really worry for her future and her health. Please, for your child's sake....STOP NOW...before it gets any more out of hand!!

~AW

Rain Gnosis
August 11th, 2003, 02:19 PM
What did your doctor think of this?

Autumn
August 11th, 2003, 03:55 PM
I am thinking maybe a childrens' dieticician or nutritionist is called for here...plus you have to involve her in this or it flat out will not work...

13thChylde
August 11th, 2003, 04:15 PM
:eyebrow: Stop cooking them for her?

...raw carrots are high in carbs, grape juice is high in carbs, 1 cup of pineapple has 19.2 grams of carbs in it. So, it's not as simple as not cooking them. I haven't found the actual recommended limit for children, but for adults on low-carb diets it is 20g.

Savannah will eat fruit at every meal, and she's always been pretty good about her veggies and we've never had a problem with getting her to eat the good stuff. But she craves the carbs - bread + cereal + crackers particularly.

Her doctor said, you can no more tell a carb-addicted person to not eat the cake than you can tell a deaf child to listen harder.

Phoenix Blue
August 11th, 2003, 04:47 PM
:rolleyes: Whatever. Addictions can, by definition, be broken. Comparing an addiction to a disability is ludicrous. I'd ask for a second opinion.

The recommended limit for children is probably a little higher than it is for adults. In any case, a lot of the carbohydrates in fruit and vegetables are from raw sugars like glucose, which aren't too bad. Carbohydrates from fruit juice and the like, however, are more likely to be processed sugars - and that's what really sits in the system.


Alternately, maybe you could work with your doctor (or another doctor if he insists on treating your daughter's addiction like a disability) to develop an exercise program that will work off the extra calories?

Rain Gnosis
August 11th, 2003, 05:14 PM
Look for charts listing foods by glycemic index. The higher the glycemic index, the faster sugar is pumped into your bloodstream, so you try to stick to lower glycemic foods whenever possible. High glycemic foods include refined breads and breakfast cereals, potatoes, white rice and rice cakes, waffles, french fries, etc. Low glycemic carbs include a lot of fruits and veggies, some grains, low fat cottage cheese, etc. There are also moderate gylcemic foods you limit consumption of. Carbs still need to be a major part of your diet.

In other words, I don't think it's necessary to cut down on carbs as much as choose better ones more often. Does she eat several small meals a day? Protein and carbs at each meal? This would keep her levels more even throughout the day.

All IMHO anyway.

13thChylde
August 11th, 2003, 09:25 PM
:rolleyes: Whatever. Addictions can, by definition, be broken. Comparing an addiction to a disability is ludicrous. I'd ask for a second opinion.

The recommended limit for children is probably a little higher than it is for adults. In any case, a lot of the carbohydrates in fruit and vegetables are from raw sugars like glucose, which aren't too bad. Carbohydrates from fruit juice and the like, however, are more likely to be processed sugars - and that's what really sits in the system.


Alternately, maybe you could work with your doctor (or another doctor if he insists on treating your daughter's addiction like a disability) to develop an exercise program that will work off the extra calories?

I know full well what a disability is, my husband is in a wheelchair. And I never said her dr is treating this like a disability. As far as exercise goes - last week she passed her black belt in tae kwon do exam, 2 weeks from now she starts ice hockey and she swims for an hour each afternoon, not to mention trampoline time and scootering.

She's no couch potato.

Aspasia Sariel
August 12th, 2003, 12:04 AM
Here's another thought, from someone who has a child who has this problem and suffers from it herself.

My son and I have sensory dysfunction. We both tend to some of the very same "bad" foods listed here simply because we have a huge adversion to certain textures and feelings in our mouth. For example, it took me a very long time to eat a salad, I had to teach myself how to handle the different textures in my mouth. Maybe that could be a little part of it? Smells, tastes, food coloration and feel all have had an influence on my diet for as long as I can remember, and from that I was an exceptionally picky eater and even though I was very active I have (and still do) struggle to keep my body healthy. My son is the same way, although his sd is much more severe.

Juicing things that I normally don't eat has helped...mixed with some seltzer; they have that fabulous whipped yogurt that's done wonders for me (I normally could NOT stomach yogurt)...now, this may not be the case but I'm just learning about how my sd works and how I can work around it, otherwise I would have said the same about me back when I was seven....

Kimberlily
August 12th, 2003, 12:55 AM
It isn't necessarily the carbs themselves that are bad, but the types of carbs. If she eats complex carbohydrates instead of simple carbs, they won't be converted into sugar as quickly, and her body will have the opportunity to use the energy instead of just storing it as fat. One thing I've learned from dealing with my husband's weight problem is that foods that raise your insulin level (foods that have a "high glycemic index") will make you gain weight. Without an elevated insulin level, your body will not store foods as fat, no matter what you're eating. Right now, my husband & I are on a diet that restricts the types of carbs you eat, and how you combine them with other foods. He's lost weight already (enough to make a difference in how his clothes fit), and it has been less than a month.

OceanEyes
August 12th, 2003, 06:55 AM
I am actually going through this too, to some extent. My daughter is also seven, and while she has put on some weight in the last year or so (she's getting a pudgy tummy) she isn't by any means overweight. My husband and I are both carb-addicts (and both really trying not to be!) so I am recognizing the same behaviors in her.

For us, I limit the obvious - juice, sugary snacks etc. and I try really hard to offer protein at every meal. Breakfast can be hard, because there aren't as many "breakfasty" options, but I do fairly well at lunch and supper.

The good part about realizing now (while they're seven) what needs to be done, is they are not old enough to take matters into their own hands. I can easily limit what I purchase, and she can't drive or walk to the store on her own to get it.

By the same token, it means I have to be downright vigilant about providing plenty of good choices.

The only thing I can really suggest right now, is Dr. Atkins Carb counter book. It contains glycemic index numbers (which someone previously mentioned) and is very small, so it's easy to cart to the grocery store.

Eating out will probably never get much better, so I am trying to just not do it very often. Good for me, and good for her. :)

Best wishes.

Faery-Wings
August 12th, 2003, 07:26 AM
Look for charts listing foods by glycemic index. The higher the glycemic index, the faster sugar is pumped into your bloodstream, so you try to stick to lower glycemic foods whenever possible. High glycemic foods include refined breads and breakfast cereals, potatoes, white rice and rice cakes, waffles, french fries, etc. Low glycemic carbs include a lot of fruits and veggies, some grains, low fat cottage cheese, etc. There are also moderate gylcemic foods you limit consumption of. Carbs still need to be a major part of your diet.

In other words, I don't think it's necessary to cut down on carbs as much as choose better ones more often. Does she eat several small meals a day? Protein and carbs at each meal? This would keep her levels more even throughout the day.

All IMHO anyway.

Excellent advice. It will be really important for her to be able to feel like she has a lot of control over what she is eating, as well as having a variety of foods to eat.

You said she is really active, could it be that she is just muscular? And the hungry all the time could be that she is growing and burning a lot of cals? Most of my son's friends who are 7 all have to be close to 60-65 pounds themselves.

I do agree that parents need to be concerned with what foods our kids are eating and the quality of it. So that is great that you are looking into that now. The gycemic indexes wil lhelp maintain blood sugar levels, so she doesn't get that crash. ANd protien takes longer to digest and will help keep a fuller feeling longer.

I hope she does well with it.
:)

13thChylde
August 12th, 2003, 09:19 AM
Look for charts listing foods by glycemic index. The higher the glycemic index, the faster sugar is pumped into your bloodstream, so you try to stick to lower glycemic foods whenever possible. High glycemic foods include refined breads and breakfast cereals, potatoes, white rice and rice cakes, waffles, french fries, etc. Low glycemic carbs include a lot of fruits and veggies, some grains, low fat cottage cheese, etc. There are also moderate gylcemic foods you limit consumption of. Carbs still need to be a major part of your diet.

Thanks, Rain Gnosis (my daughter's middle name is Rain, by the way :))

I already am a major label reader, b/c I have celiac disease (no wheat, rye,oats or barley), so I'm used to having a limited diet. And we try to eat all gluten-free foods at home for convenience...but we do eat an awful lot of rice and rice products. We bake exclusively with rice flour. I need to check on the index for wheat vs rice, I suppose.

Rain Gnosis
August 12th, 2003, 02:37 PM
Yep, white rice is pretty high on the scale. So are things like pasta and potatoes.

Here's a short list of foods by glycemic index - http://www.fatwars.com/CA/lifestyle_glycemicindex.php

You don't mention what she eats so sorry if you're already doing this but I really think making sure she eats 5-6 small meals a day with protein and low glycemic carbs would make a big difference. That's what I'm trying to do myself now to keep my sugar level etc. (diabetes runs in my family pretty heavily so I'm trying to get a headstart on it)

Ben Gruagach
August 12th, 2003, 03:22 PM
You might also want to look at diabetics' diets, as they are all about controlling blood sugar levels. I understand that the Susanne Somers diet books are more balanced and tend towards the low-carb end of things.

Check with the doctor/nutrician, though. They might have a preferred "system" that they fell will work best with your circumstances.

bluglass
August 25th, 2003, 03:14 PM
all great advise. And in our house we talk about good, healthy food and junk food. I drill it into my kids heads all the time. They can eat junk food but only after we eat sufficient healthy food and they get limited treats a day. I stress that we we eat what we need to and not over eat. I don't force them to clean their plates and I serve age appropriate portions. At your child's age a serving should be about a 1/4 cup. My kids always get a protein of some kind, a green veggie and a yellow veggie and a fruit. They can eat in any order. When we go out to eat they are told what they can choose from. They aren't allowed to fill up on milk or water first either. Pop is a treat for perhaps once a week and we just don't buy fruit juice and if we do it gets watered 50%. It is an empty food good only for when they are sick. We use real butter and real cheese, whole greain breads and we limit pasta rice and other simple carbos that are not nutritionally dense -- which is why the carbos in fruit are better -- they are also high in fiber which mitigate the carbo load by the same number of grams (a la Atkins) which I would never put a kid on. Kids need fat for brain development and twice as much carbo as adults. But you can make healthy choices such as real yogurt not Danimals and the like. Real butter which does not have transfatty acids. Eggo waffels if you don't make your own. My dh chooses to make batches of pancakes because they are real food in comparison to a lot of junk. We stopped buying frosted cereals and the kids seem to love shredded wheat -- go figure.

It is basically up to the adults to model good eating habits and reinforce the lessons that support it. Your pediatrician should have a list of foods and portions for your child. We get a sheet at every well child visit telling the basics of what they can and should eat. Talk to them they usually have resources or referals.

13thChylde
August 26th, 2003, 11:11 AM
We went to the local Food Hole yesterday (Whole Foods) and she helped pick out a lot of lunch items and she even got some low-carb pasta...my poor hubby now has to fix 2 kinds of noodles - low-carb for her and gluten-free for me:geez: She has been taking her lunch regularly, and we've all switched from ice cream to fruit sorbets for our "special treats." She's also into the low-carb energy bars, perfect for when she has hockey practice or cup-stacking in the afternoons.

So, I think she's doing much better! We talk about choices at each meal and she's not so grouchy anymore.

IvyCeltress
August 26th, 2003, 11:40 AM
I'm trying to swith to low-carb as it is supoosed to help with my boardline diabetes, PCOS (Polycystical Ovary Syndrome).

Have you tried Irish Oatmeal? It's less processed than Quaker, and I find much more filling.

Also as another suggestion, in stead of chicken nuggets at McDonalds of Wnedy's try one of their chicken solids. They are pretty good, and if you don't put on the croutons, they are pretty low in carbs.

13thChylde
August 26th, 2003, 12:11 PM
Also as another suggestion, in stead of chicken nuggets at McDonalds of Wnedy's try one of their chicken solids. They are pretty good, and if you don't put on the croutons, they are pretty low in carbs.

She loves Wendy's salads, so that makes life on the run easier.

VelvetBlade
August 26th, 2003, 12:27 PM
I have a question...I've heard that when you cut out the bad carbs...you end up with incredible carb cravings...how do you deal with those...and what do you do with someone who hates fruits and veggies? ...

~AW

bluglass
August 26th, 2003, 12:32 PM
who says breakfast has to be of the cereal type? I think that is a cultural thing we have gotten into. Perhaps cultivating a new concept of what foods can be eaten for breakfast is in order. We sometimes eat cheese/balogna rollups and half a banana with a few ounces of 2% or water. We also eat a tablespoon of peanutbutter -- on the spoon with rasins or an apple and milk or water.

We are so locked into what foods go at what time of day. You could get into eating roasted veggies for breakfast with a small piece of whole grain bread with a little melted cheese. Oh, I think I'm going to do that tomorrow!

bluglass
August 26th, 2003, 12:33 PM
Once you get out of burning carbs and your blood sugar and insulin production stabalize the cravings stop. Takes about 2 days. And if you are eating enough other foods, as in 6 small meals a day, you shouldn't have any cravings.

bluglass
August 26th, 2003, 12:35 PM
oh, hockey practice, your child expends enormous amounts of energy. There should be 1/4 to 1/2 cup of fruit with the protein bar. As opposed to say swim team where they have short bursts of energy so they often eat things like oranges -- at least that's what our swim coach did.

IvyCeltress
August 26th, 2003, 12:43 PM
BTW, I forgot to mention there is a good book about low carb diets called "The Goddess Diet" Apt, yes?

bluglass
August 26th, 2003, 01:03 PM
I read back and you started off saying you were worried about your child being a carbohydrate addict. I for one transferred that to what they doctor was implying or possibly said. But it is really your concern. It looks like the thread did a "broken radio" with how the discussion developed.

Wow, how do you guys do it all? You are an amazing family to be so involved and supportive of your child. You must be modeling great habits to have a child who has such focus and understanding of the long-term payoff. Of course in accomplishing a black belt she must have learned that lesson for herself and the pleasure and confidence that come with accomplishment.

Can you bottle that or teach me? My son just turned 6yrs old and only weights 42lbs. A true feather weight right now. He is really very small and we always get a mixed concern at his well visits. Dad and other relatives on both sides are tall and well build so they think he will get some growth in puberty but they aren't sure. We don't want him to learn bad eating habits because then he could become small and fat rather than small, muscular and healthy. But you can see every rib so the concern is that he really doesn't eat, but when he gets ready to grow or has just grown (we aren't sure which) he packs it away like he has never seen food before or will again -- then he slows way down. We can literally see from growth to growth whether he has gotten taller or wider.

Given this new information about how truly active your child is, perhaps just better general food choices are in order and I wouldn't worry about the carbo thing so much at all. But since she is an athlete learning about complex carbo and glycemic index should be useful to her to help stay strong, not get fatigued during workouts or competitions and recuperate better after injury and training bursts.

Sounds like measuring her BMI is in order. This will help you have a better idea of whether or not she is just very strong or not.

IvyCeltress
August 26th, 2003, 01:04 PM
Here's the link to the Goddess diet site:

http://www.goddessdiet.com/

I really need to dig up my copy , for a refresher.