PDA

View Full Version : Advice on oil paints?



Armitage
June 14th, 2001, 12:53 AM
I've just began using oil paints and was wondering if anyone had lots of experience on what all the different stuff does effect-wise, like liquin, linseed oil, gum arabic, etc.. I've been getting some nice effects with just turp and paint, and would like to get a little more professional with it.

keelyoherne
June 16th, 2001, 03:29 AM
Originally posted by Armitage
I've just began using oil paints and was wondering if anyone had lots of experience on what all the different stuff does effect-wise, like liquin, linseed oil, gum arabic, etc.. I've been getting some nice effects with just turp and paint, and would like to get a little more professional with it.

I haven't painted in years, but I remember some of it.

Linseed oil is good for thinning out the paints a bit if you want a smoother effect. Never worked with liquin or gum arabic.

Turpentine is good for doing washes for underpaintings, but I must post a big caution about turp. It is very toxic. A very good friend of mine is a wonderful painter, and oil paint was her chosen medium. Suddenly she started getting very sick every time she painted and finally traced it to exposure to turpentine. Even painting in a well ventilated area and avoiding contact with turp on her skin did not help. She still can't paint with oils because of this. Please, just exercise caution with that stuff.

Now, back to painting. What kind of painting do you like to do with oils? Do you like to apply big gobs of thick paint and a palette knife, or do you like to do the finer well blended technique? I used to love to paint with heavy use of the fan brush for blending. Never got in to the palette knife technique. Just used it for mixing colors. :)

Practice, practice, practice. Take a class on it at your local community college if they offer it. Watch the Bob Ross shows on TV (seriously, this guy was great, may the Gods enjoy him in the Summerlands), find techniques that you are comforatble with. There might even be some great instructional videos out there too.

Good luck, I hope you enjoy oils as much as I used to. Really no space in my life to paint like that right now, but hopefully someday...

Keely

Niamh
July 11th, 2001, 10:29 PM
Best of luck with the painting!
I use mineral spirits instead of the turp. "Real" turp is rather difficult to come by in artist shops.
When I want to thin down my paints I tend to go for the linseed oil, or a combination of the mineral spirits and linseed. If you want to go very thin, use the combo.
That's about all I use. If I want texture, etc. I try to do that with the actual paint. But generally my paintings have a very smooth surface area.
Again, best of luck, and have fun!

keelyoherne
July 12th, 2001, 02:29 PM
Originally posted by Niamh

I use mineral spirits instead of the turp. "Real" turp is rather difficult to come by in artist shops.
When I want to thin down my paints I tend to go for the linseed oil, or a combination of the mineral spirits and linseed. If you want to go very thin, use the combo.
That's about all I use. If I want texture, etc. I try to do that with the actual paint. But generally my paintings have a very smooth surface area.
Again, best of luck, and have fun!

Hi Niamh.

Is mineral spirits less toxic than turpentine? If it is I'd like to recommend it to my friend so she can start painting with oils again. I know she really misses it.

One thing I'd like to try when I can start painting again is an oil painting on masonite. Have you done this? I bet you can get some really smooth paintings that way.

Keely

Niamh
July 12th, 2001, 04:45 PM
Hi There,
Yes, mineral spirits are less toxic than turpentine. Generally speaking, the real thing is only sold at stores that sell paints and stains for house painting. Most house paints are latex based, though many outdoor paints are oil based, and just about all stains are. Professional house painters like to use real turp.
If you're at the art store and see something called turpentine, read the lable, it might not be the real thing and will therefore be less toxic.
I've painted on masonite a few times and loved it! But I did sand it down a bit and possibly throw a coat of gesso on it. Otherwise your oils might slip right off!
Happy painting!

rheirene
July 14th, 2001, 05:07 AM
Hello all,
my mother and I use oil paints,
I agree about the linseed oil, but also you can use sunflower oil
{pure] it works really well too.
as for turp,another source ,though a little pricy, is the thinners and cleaners for models,my husband does all sorts of models
[cars ,boats etc.]the kits he buys for them have some really good thinners and cleaners ,the smell isn't strong at all,theres just not alot in a bottle;lol. But they work real well in a pinch.:)

oh ,I also love the fan brush,it creates some beautiful affects.
B.B. rheirene

Armitage
July 14th, 2001, 01:13 PM
I've never used masonite....I've been using gesso-ed illustration board, my favorite thing to work on ever. Canvasses are just too rough, and can't be cut down to custom sizes, and I'm horrible at stretching my own.