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Mairwen
June 26th, 2001, 09:19 AM
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From: "ACLU of Kentucky" <acluky@iglou.com>
Date: 2001/06/25 Mon PM 05:27:26 EDT
To: "Jeff Vessels" <acluky@iglou.com>
Subject: ACLU of KY ALERT: Coalition Launches School Anti-Harassment Project

June 25, 2001

ACLU of KY ALERT: Coalition Launches School Anti-Harassment Project

Contacts: Natalie Reteneller, Louisville Youth Group, 502/454-3300. Jeff Vessels, ACLU of Kentucky, 502/581-1181.


Coalition launches Student Pocket Card Project to prevent school harassment

LOUISVILLE, KY * Today the Hate Free Schools Coalition launched the Student
Pocket Card Project to inform students of their right to attend schools
free from harassment and discrimination.

"Our message is that every student is valued, regardless of race, gender,
sexual orientation, national origin, disability, religious beliefs, and
other factors," said Elizabeth Sawyer, Co-Chair of the Hate Free Schools
Coalition. "The purpose of the Student Pocket Card Project is to inform
students that they can and should do something to stop any harassment they
might experience at school."

"Whether it comes from other students or teachers or others at school,
students experiencing harassment need to know that they are not alone and
don't have to put up with such treatment," said Michael Walker, the
Coalition's other Co-Chair. "We want to inform them of the steps they can
take to stop harassment."

The business card sized Pocket Card defines harassment and lists steps a
student should take to document, report, and get emotional support if they
experience harassment. The card encourages students to contact The Hate
Free Schools Coalition through the American Civil Liberties Union of
Kentucky for guidance and support.

In addition to the ACLU of Kentucky, the Coalition includes the Louisville
Youth Group, Kentucky Youth Advocates, the Fairness Campaign, the National
Coalition Building Institute, Kentucky Fairness Alliance, MasterMinds
(youth group of the Kentucky Alliance Against Racist and Political
Repression), the Peace Education Program, the Gay and Lesbian Teachers
Caucus of the Jefferson County Teachers Association, Parents and Friends of
Lesbians and Gays, and others.

Recent studies reveal the prevalence of bullying in the nation's schools,
its impact on self esteem and the ability to succeed in school, and the
relationship between the pain of experiencing such treatment and recent
fatal school shootings. A Kaiser Family Foundation and Nickelodeon study
released in March found that bullying and teasing top the list of middle-
and high-school students' troubles. And in the first large-scale national
study of bullying in schools, whose results were released in April, a
survey of nearly 16,000 American sixth through tenth graders by the World
Health Organization revealed that one-third had experienced bullying at
school. The WHO survey defined "bullying" as "verbal or physical behavior
designed to disturb someone less powerful." The WHO researchers noted that
intervention programs in England and Norway have reduced bullying by 30-50%.

To request Pocket Cards and speakers, contact The Hate Free Schools
Coalition via the ACLU of Kentucky, 502/581-1181, in Louisville.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jeff Vessels, Executive Director
ACLU of Kentucky
425 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd., Suite 230
Louisville, KY 40202
502/581-1181 * www.aclu-ky.org * FAX 502/589-9687


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Astraea
June 26th, 2001, 10:49 AM
That's pretty interesting.
I think that even if that anti-harrassment program doesn't prove as effective as people are hoping, it's still a step in the right direction. We can't force anyone to stop being intolerant- not even children- but we can make them aware that their intolerance is unethical and that there are concequences for intolerance- especially when it leads to violence. This anti-harrassment card will most likely raise awareness, if nothing else. Definitely a positive step.

Yvonne Belisle
March 25th, 2004, 05:04 PM
Now that there has been a lot of hype on school shootings do you think things like this program should be implemented in more schools across the US?

Xentor
March 26th, 2004, 05:24 AM
Yes, I think it really helps to follow the instructions on an anti-harrassment pocket card after being shot.

aluokaloo
March 26th, 2004, 03:19 PM
Geeze where these people when I was in school? I think it is defintely a step in the right direction, I mean teachers and other people complain and moan about how dangerous schools are nowadays, and I say well, it starts in preschool, teasing somebody bursting into tears, as the years go by its turned into pushing, ganging up on people and finally shootings, sexual harrasment and small bombs. Why? All because the teachers never did a damn thing, and if you tattletaled you were the one who either got ignored, shrugged off and told to deal with it or you got into trouble. Well, if they had never let it get that bad, maybe our schools would need less metal detectors. Finally they are wising up, took the lazy people long enough. I'm glad its underway, but I'm still going to have my daugter take self defense classes so that if someone gets too rough she can bop em in the kisser.

blueiris
March 26th, 2004, 03:34 PM
We have an anti-harrassment program in our school, a strict harrassment policy you can get suspended and the like.
Sadly, the person only gets punished if they're reported (well that makes sense doesn't it? :rolleyes: )...so a lot of it goes unnoticed and unpunished.

Vanessa TPD
March 27th, 2004, 08:58 PM
Geeze where these people when I was in school? I think it is defintely a step in the right direction, I mean teachers and other people complain and moan about how dangerous schools are nowadays, and I say well, it starts in preschool, teasing somebody bursting into tears, as the years go by its turned into pushing, ganging up on people and finally shootings, sexual harrasment and small bombs. Why? All because the teachers never did a damn thing, and if you tattletaled you were the one who either got ignored, shrugged off and told to deal with it or you got into trouble. Well, if they had never let it get that bad, maybe our schools would need less metal detectors. Finally they are wising up, took the lazy people long enough. I'm glad its underway, but I'm still going to have my daugter take self defense classes so that if someone gets too rough she can bop em in the kisser.

My middle school had an anti-harassment program. It didn't stop me from being harassed - my teacher still never did a damn thing. I'd invest in the self-defense class :) .

Dark Phoenix
March 27th, 2004, 09:05 PM
It can't hurt to inform people of their rights but yeah all the laws in world won't stop harassment