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Aidron
November 1st, 2003, 07:46 PM
I honestly forget where I got this rather generic formula from, but I want to say from a book by Scott Cunningham, which is as follows:

1 part table salt
2 parts baking soda
3 parts epsom salt

However, if you don't use it up right away it hardens to the point that you need an ice pick to break the stuff apart, and I seal them in air tight jars.

Has anyone else had better success with bath salts and them not hardening to the point where you are forced to stab them with an ice pick screaming "DAMN YOU!" ? :lol:

I couldn't decide where to put this, and the Green Room seemed a good choice, but rarely if ever do I even use herbs in the bath salts, so there you have it.

Bainidhe Dub
November 2nd, 2003, 09:21 PM
I like Epsom salts and coarse sea salt. I use equal parts, but of course it's easily adjustable to fit what you like. :) (and yes, that recipe is from Cunningham)

Aidron
November 2nd, 2003, 10:02 PM
I've tried the coarse sea salt as well, but since regular salt is often more readily available I tend to just stick with it.

I've tried eliminating the salt all together, believing that was what was causing it to basically harden since salt will do that over time due to moisturize, but no luck. :hrmm:

Bainidhe Dub
November 2nd, 2003, 10:06 PM
Hmm.. have you tried those clay do-hickey things that they put in brown sugar to keep it from turning to brick? (That was my mother's suggestion lol)

Aidron
November 2nd, 2003, 10:09 PM
Actually no, and I haven't the foggiest idea what you are speaking of, so I will have to confer with my book of shadows on mundane things, my mother. :lol:

I thought about rice, as people often put that in salt to keep it from becoming solidified, but who wants to take a rice bath? Not me.

Bainidhe Dub
November 2nd, 2003, 10:17 PM
The little clay do-hickeys... *thinks* I know they have a technical name lol. They sell them in cooking/kitchen stores in the baking aisle.

MoonRaven
November 3rd, 2003, 12:23 PM
Oh I've got one of those... they work great for brown sugar because they keep it moist, but I think the idea of bath salts is to keep them dry - it's the moisture that makes them clump to begin with :)

I've never had any luck with it either - I think that's why you can buy little cubes of bath salts - it's just easier that way!
Commercial bath salts usually contain dendritic salts to stop clumping, but I've heard you can mix a little glycerin into the salts as well to help.

Aidron
November 3rd, 2003, 08:19 PM
Well I prefer to make my own, so I rarely buy commercial ones unless it is just to splurge in relaxation and for entirely nonmagical reasons.

However, glycerin, that is definitely interesting.

Faery-Wings
November 3rd, 2003, 08:21 PM
I use dendritic salt in my baths salts. So far I haven't had any problems, but they are sealed tight until the customer opens the jar. After they leave my house, I don't know if they clump or not- no one has complained though. :)

Aidron
November 3rd, 2003, 09:08 PM
Where do you acquire your dendritic salt?

Mine, no matter if I don't open them after putting them in a air tight jar or not, always clump up sooner or later, but I've bought others that do not.

Flar's Freyja
November 4th, 2003, 02:20 AM
I've tried the coarse sea salt as well, but since regular salt is often more readily available I tend to just stick with it.

I've tried eliminating the salt all together, believing that was what was causing it to basically harden since salt will do that over time due to moisturize, but no luck. :hrmm:

I wish that I could be of more help. I know that I personally would not use anything with sea salt in it because I once put some in my bath and it irritated "delicate" parts....

I would love to see someone develop a bath "salt" with oatmeal or oat straw, which is very moisturing. I currently use the colloidal oatmeal baths that they sell in drugstores but it makes an awful mess in the tub.

Aidron
November 4th, 2003, 02:22 AM
I wish that I could be of more help. I know that I personally would not use anything with sea salt in it because I once put some in my bath and it irritated "delicate" parts....

I would love to see someone develop a bath "salt" with oatmeal or oat straw, which is very moisturing. I currently use the colloidal oatmeal baths that they sell in drugstores but it makes an awful mess in the tub.

Oatmeal, hmm? Shouldn't be hard. Gather up some dried oatmeal, grind it down into a powdered form using a mortar and pestle and add it to the generic recipe I posted previously.

Oat straw I am not entirely familiar with, but if it's a plant you can grind it down! :lol:

The baking soda actuallly moisturizes me quite a lot, though I'm sure covering myself in moisturizer helps too.

shadowdancer
November 4th, 2003, 02:31 AM
ok i like the idea of bath salts but when making it says to use 1 part of something. what does 1 part mean? or where can i find the info about the measuring lol. i know its probly a stupid question.

Aidron
November 4th, 2003, 02:59 AM
ok i like the idea of bath salts but when making it says to use 1 part of something. what does 1 part mean? or where can i find the info about the measuring lol. i know its probly a stupid question.


A couple years back I asked the same thing, what with knowing absolutely nothing about cooking and the like. :lol:

It's quite basic, however. Let's say you want to use 2 parts of Epsom salt. Well, the recipe calls for 3 parts Epsom Salt, 2 parts Baking Soda, and 1 part table salt, as you well know, so it would wind up like this:

2 cups Epsom Salt
1 cup Baking Soda
1/2 cup Table Salt

You could also look at it as if you wish to end up with 3 1/2 cups (what the above totals to) and then decipher how much you need of each.

Using that method let's say you want 6 cups of a bath salt. This translates to:

3 cups of Epsom Salt
2 cups of Baking Soda
1 cup of Table Salt

Faery-Wings
November 4th, 2003, 08:14 AM
Hi Raven- I get my dendritic salt at http://www.snowdriftfarm.com/

HTH

Raven7
November 4th, 2003, 10:47 AM
dont know if anyone posted this in reply but DONT USE BAKING SODA!! its an odor *sp* absorber...all you need is the salt and oils...I never had a complaint yet (in fact just the opposite)

as for portions when I do it for just myself I'd use lets say 1 cup to however many drops of oil I'd like (depending on how strong or soft I wanted it)...and dont store your salts in plastic (wasted a whole batch that way dang nab it), you can for a short period of time (like when I had to make a specific batch for someone and they were pickin it up within a couple of days I'd put it in plastic ziploc bags but would tell them to get it into glass jars as soon as possible)

Just my personal experience :)

Rave

shadowdancer
November 4th, 2003, 10:49 AM
thank you raven windsong :)

soapywitch
November 4th, 2003, 02:02 PM
I too use dendritic salt in my bath salt exclusively because it keeps the salts loose and clump free. It's my personal opinion that it helps the salts to retain their scent as well. It doesn't take much to work. Just add a tablespoon or so to every 3 cups of base salt and mix well. Then add your colorant and scented/essential oil. There is a great site I buy all of my salt supplies from (very high quality) including dendritic salt @ www.fromnaturewithlove.com. You can get some for $3.00. I don't recommend Cunningham's recipe or food coloring as colorants. If you want a great recipe just ask me. I learned on my own through trial and error. :flowers:

Alphya
September 18th, 2010, 06:34 PM
I'm new to making my own bath products, but thought I'd revive this thread, as I have a recipe that works great :)

Makes approximately 500g of Bath Salts

What you need:
* 480g of Sea Salts [Fine or coarse, or a mixture of the two]
* 20g Bicarbonate of Soda [not baking soda, it's different]
* 4ml of your chosen essential oil [See further down for a rough guide]
* A tablespoon of dried flowers/petals/herbs to match the oil scent
* A couple of drops of food colouring/cosmetic pigment [just enough to tint the salts lightly]
* An airtight glass jar

Method:
- Mix the salts and Bicarbonate of Soda in a large bowl until well blended.

- Add the colouring [just a tiny bit] and mix in until all the salts are evenly coloured to a pastel shade.

- Drip the essential oil evenly over the surface of the salts and mix thoroughly. You may find that the colour will deepen.

- Leave the salts in the bowl overnight so that the fragrance can be absorbed.

- The next day, once the salts have dried, stir again until they are free-flowing, then add your herbs/petals.

- Spoon into a large airtight jar. For a creative twist, fill the jar with alternating layers of salts and petals.

That's it! Easy peasy.
Some good combinations:

Patchouli essential oil and dried Patchouli leaves - Money-drawing & Energising.

Carnation Essential oil and dried Carnation petals - Love, health and magickal energy.

Peppermint Essential oil and dried or fresh mint leaves - Purification & stimulation.

Geranium Essential oil and dried Rose petals/buds - Happiness & protection.

Lavender Essential oil and dried Lavender flowers - Calming & peaceful.

Neroli Essential oil - Joy & aphrodisiac.

Sandalwood Essential oil - Meditation & spirituality.

Ylang Ylang Essential oil - Love & aphrodisiac.

Lime & Ginger Essential oils - Stimulating & energising.

Some essential oils can't be used on the skin, even when diluted. Always consult a reliable source [Google is a good one ;D] if you're unsure.

Godgifu
March 12th, 2011, 01:45 PM
A putting a saltine cracker in the bottle is another trick to keep salt and sugar from turning hard. I live in the Southwest and out here it's so dry most folks never have problems with that, but I used to see that in restaurants in California a lot.