PDA

View Full Version : Ontario authorizes 60-hour work week



Earth Walker
September 4th, 2001, 01:22 PM
New labour legislation also allows less overtime pay and
one-day vacations.

New Ontario labour legislation that goes into effect today
allows employers to seek signed agreements with workers
authorizing 60-hour work weeks, less overtime pay and
and one-day vacations.
Ontario Labour Minister Chris Stockwell describes changes
to the Employment Standards Act as "fairly inconsequential"
because employees can reject their bosses' proposals for
such arrangements. People who refuse to sign will still be
governed by standards limiting maximum weekly hours of
work to 48 hours and regular provisions for overtime and
vacation.
Norene Pupo, director of York University's Centre for
Research on Work and Society, said the new measures
favour employers and provide little protection to non-unionized
people who, in the absence of union contracts, depend on the
workplace rules in the Employment Standards Act.
"Workers will have little choice but to sign up," she said.
"There are other workers to take their jobs, particularly in
unskilled work where most of them will be."
Under the new legislation, both parties can agree in writing
to a 60-hour work week. Under the old system, work week
extensions were allowed under a special labour ministry permit.
In 1999, the ministry issued permits covering 18,000 employees
in addition to industry permits for the mining, logging and
tourism industries. Stockwell points out that seven of 10
provinces in Canada have no cap on hours.
A more controversial provision allows employers to seek
written agreements from employees for the averaging of work
hours in a way that doesn't accrue overtime pay, which normally
starts after 44 hours. The averaging can take place over up to
four weeks.
Until now, for instance, employees who worked 60 hours in the
first week, then a regular 44-hour week and then two 36-hour
weeks would be entitled to 16 hours of paid overtime.
Under the new system, they won't receive any overtime
because they will average 44 hours per week over four weeks.
While the new measures eliminate red tape in the form of
permits and give employers greater work schedule flexibility,
Stockwell said they also help families where working parents
are trading off child care responsibilities.
Until now he argued, employers were reluctant to allow
employees to put in 60 hours one week and 20 the next because
of overtime costs.

Workers in B.C. work 40-hour weeks----but a lot has changed
since the LIEberals took power---will keep you updated.

Myst
March 12th, 2002, 04:27 PM
You know some people think of 60 hour work weeks as normal as is.

Illuminatus
March 13th, 2002, 02:13 PM
Originally posted by Myst
You know some people think of 60 hour work weeks as normal as is.

There are no laws protecting salaried workers like us Myst :(

We are the true victims

There should be a government agencey whose job it is to give us money!

maythen
March 13th, 2002, 09:47 PM
If a person chooses to work 60 or more hours a week, that's fine. Even if one has to work like that for awhile to make ends meet..well, ya gotta do what ya gotta do. But for an employer to mandate that his employees work those amount of hours on a regular basis - that's just wrong in my opinion.

A person should work to live, not live to work.

Just my 2 cents.

Myst
March 13th, 2002, 09:58 PM
Originally posted by Mystique
New Ontario labour legislation that goes into effect today
allows employers to seek signed agreements with workers
authorizing 60-hour work weeks, less overtime pay and
and one-day vacations

I presume since the employeers can seek signed agreements with workers the workers have consented and aren't being forced, no?