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Morning Star
November 27th, 2004, 05:38 PM
http://www.hamilton.edu/academics/Asian/TempleCulture.html

I never heard of religious Confucianism. Does anyone know anything about this path?

I've hear that there are people who still practice this.

arctic splash
November 28th, 2004, 01:16 PM
http://www.hamilton.edu/academics/Asian/TempleCulture.html

I never heard of religious Confucianism. Does anyone know anything about this path?

I've hear that there are people who still practice this.

I studied Chinese religious history last year. I remember studying religious Confucianism, although Confucianism itself was my least favourite subject, so I don't remember much about it! There's always going to be a lot of debate as to whether Confucianism can be considered a religion or not...

I think it's a path that begins with serving the family, then the community, then the world... and eventually, as you come further on the Confucian path, you are able to serve the entire Universe. You achieve this by clarifying your qi and improving your intuition.

It's also very metaphysical... that was the most interesting part of it, to me... here's an excerpt from encarta.msn.com, about two of the most famous Confucian philosophers, Cheng Yi and Cheng Hao (qi, by the way, is also often translated -- especially by non-Confucians -- as energy or life force):

Two brothers, Cheng Yi and Cheng Hao, developed a systematic basis for neo-Confucianism in the 11th century. They argued that everything in existence has two aspects, qi or “stuff,” and li, which can be thought of as pattern or structure, although the standard translation is “principle.” All of the li, or structure, is fully present in each thing that exists, they claimed. But things are differentiated by the clarity of their qi. Humans have clearer qi than dogs, and a dog has clearer qi than a sunflower. Things of the same general kind are also distinguished by the level of clarity of their qi. So, although we are both humans, a sage like Confucius has much clearer qi than do I. Nonetheless, both Confucius and I have more clear qi than an ant.

Later, in the 12th century, the philosopher Zhu Xi was influential:

Zhu Xi believed that the qi of most people is so turbid (unclear) initially that they cannot rely upon their inclinations to guide them to do what is right. However, studying the classic texts, along with meditation and ritual practice, will help people clarify their qi, so that they can eventually rely on their own intuitions. Zhu Xi also thought that students were unlikely to understand the classics without help, so he wrote clear, concise, insightful commentaries on these books.

Jolixte
November 28th, 2004, 01:24 PM
My friend follows Confucianism for moral guidelines, it's not really a religion. I think her actually religion is Daoism, though I may be wrong.

BenSt
November 28th, 2004, 09:30 PM
I beg to differ. It is a religion, it's like a religion of scholars and elders. Confucionism is one of the three main religions of China. Along with Toaism, and Buddhism, Confucionism affected Chinese thought. It was founded by Confucious, whose descendants still have their family tree tracing every descendant back to him. It has to do with values and one's position in society. For example, one's natural birth order will detirmine your role in the family. This is why if you go over to some Chinese provinces, the family will refer to each other by titles, such as 'Honoured Father,' 'Second daughter,' 'First son.' Duty to one's own family is a major thing, even if your family has departed. Like Taoism, honouring one's ancestors is very important, which is why Taoist and Confucian shrines are very similar.

It also has a lot to do with one's place in the world. If you are a warrior, you fight. If you are a scholar, you learn. If you are a labourer, you work. All of these things help the sociey because you are serving the greater whole and pitching in: defending, learning and teaching, and working. It also has a lot to do with affiars of state also, through proper learning and values you may outmatch your enemy with knowledge and wit. Unlike Taoism, the universe isn't a very spiritual place...so like Shintoism and Buddhims in Japan, most Chinese were both Confucian and Taoist, or Buddhist depending. It has survived Mao's cultural revolution like Taism and Buddhims did and is still practiced in China and worldwide.

If you ever see the movie 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon' the Chi, as Moonstar spoke of is what gives them the ability to glide and fly somewhat. chi is very similar to the aura, only you can, with some alterations, calibrate it to become light. The Chi is a very interesting thing :). I hope this has hlped. Namaste.

Tobias

Threase
November 28th, 2004, 09:33 PM
I beg to differ. It is a religion, it's like a religion of scholars and elders.

It's debatable, some say it is and some say it isn't... the WR textbooks at school say it's more like a philosophy than a religion... then again, I guess it all depends on who you ask...

LittleRhiannon
November 28th, 2004, 09:48 PM
We studied Confucianism last year when we were learning about China. I don't remember much of it though, unfortunatly :geez: I really should pay more attention in class :crazy:

BenSt
November 28th, 2004, 09:49 PM
On the other hand...you also must look at the bias' of the authors of your textbook...there are some who will claim theres only one religion in the world...their own.

Threase
November 28th, 2004, 09:58 PM
On the other hand...you also must look at the bias' of the authors of your textbook...there are some who will claim theres only one religion in the world...their own.

Heh, thank the gods that the textbook treats every religion in the text as they should be treated... equally. And like I said, some people see it as a religion, and some people see it as a way of life... I'm very glad I don't attend a Catholic school, I know their textbooks are biased...

BenSt
November 29th, 2004, 09:38 PM
lol, yes...thats true Catholic textbooks...are...quite biased lol. Mind you, a philosophy and a religion definatly intermix sometimes...look at Freemasonry for example, it's a philosophy practiced in a religious sort of way...and Hinduism is a set of pphilosophies...again practiced in a religious way. Namaste :)

Tobias

Morning Star
November 29th, 2004, 09:48 PM
Wow - Lots of useful information guys. Thank you so much. :) I'm quite convinced it is a religion because in some sects, there are rituals, prayers, incantations and so forth. There is a divinity. But...people will disagree...cause they're people. Very educational thread, thanks.

arctic splash
November 30th, 2004, 01:17 PM
It's debatable, some say it is and some say it isn't... the WR textbooks at school say it's more like a philosophy than a religion... then again, I guess it all depends on who you ask...

It all depends on how you define 'religion.'

arctic splash
November 30th, 2004, 01:21 PM
Wow - Lots of useful information guys. Thank you so much. :) I'm quite convinced it is a religion because in some sects, there are rituals, prayers, incantations and so forth. There is a divinity. But...people will disagree...cause they're people. Very educational thread, thanks.

Again, I think it has a lot to do with how we define religion. The classic example from my philosophy of religion course was Alcoholics Anonymous. They have rituals, prayers, incantations, and acknowledge a higher power... but does this make it a religion?

This is why, I think, there's so much debate about whether Confucianism is a religion. People are not debating what Confucianism is about, but rather, what it means to be a religion.