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MoonDragn
January 20th, 2005, 05:49 PM
I know I mentioned I was part taoist, but what exactly is taoism? Alot of you may be confused by what it means. heres a website devoted to explaining it. :

http://www.geocities.com/dao_house/basics.html

One important idea of taoism is the belief that opposites are one and the same, Yin/Yang, Light is dark, emptiness is fullness etc. Male is Female. This idea of unity of opposites is what I have been refering to when I talk about the polarity of the goddess/god in all of my arguments.

Taoism is the mysticism of science. It is a law of changes explained in a non scientific way. It is a merging of science and mysticism and has been used to explain quantum physics.

fafonen
January 20th, 2005, 09:04 PM
Thanks for the site. It looks good.

I'm new to taoism, but I'm reading the Tao of Pooh. (yes, Pooh as in Winnie the Pooh) and I'm really liking it. It explains things in a very clear, fun way as if you were reading out of one the children's books. So I suppose thats another good source.

It has a lot do with wholeness and simplicity as well. The idea of the uncarved block and such. Going with the natural laws of things.

Or at least, thats what I'm gleaning from the book. I'm merely a beginner.

Faeawyn
January 20th, 2005, 09:26 PM
Have you ever read "The Tao Of Pooh"? A friend gave me a copy of the book years ago. It was a little hard for me to grasp...or perhaps I just couldn't follow the concept...but I was wondering if you had read it :)

Verthandi
January 20th, 2005, 09:56 PM
Have you ever read "The Tao Of Pooh"? A friend gave me a copy of the book years ago. It was a little hard for me to grasp...or perhaps I just couldn't follow the concept...but I was wondering if you had read it :)
Heh, The Tao of Pooh is one of the books I have to read for my Eastern Religions class. I haven't started it yet, but I've always meant to read it.

MoonDragn
January 21st, 2005, 10:43 AM
I've read some of it, yes its a good book. I guess its easier for westerners to understand that than something like the dao de jing. Since I can read chinese I can read the thing directly and not the translated version.

Yes Taoism tries to describe nature through philosophy. It is truly a pagan religion and its really amazing how similar to wicca it is. One of the most interesting ideas I think is the fact that life is a series of non-movements. This doesn't mean that you are lazy and sit around doing nothing, it means that life is full of opportunities but you only move when the moment is right. Like chess.

blueiris
January 21st, 2005, 03:50 PM
Hey thanks for the link. I'm really interested in Eastern philosophy/religion, especially Taoism. I just bought a book onit - The Complete Idiot's Guide to Taoism. :rolleyes: It's pretty good so far. :)

Darakash
January 21st, 2005, 04:13 PM
I've read some of it, yes its a good book. I guess its easier for westerners to understand that than something like the dao de jing. Since I can read chinese I can read the thing directly and not the translated version.


Cool topic, just so happens i was doing some research on Taoism the other day and came across this site: www.truetao.org it is really informative. I loved the Tao of Pooh, and I think you are right MoonDragn, it puts things into a Western mind perspective, and that helps ALOT, when Eastern ideas are somewhat alien to us. Kind of unimportant question, but it thought it was Tao Te Ching, not dao de jing? Am I silly?

I would love to talk about some of the concepts of Taoism, as I have, as I said been investigating lately, I would love to hear your thoughts on some of the sections of Faith in Mind, like:

The Way is perfect like a great space,
Without lack, without excess.
Because of grasping and rejecting,
You cannot attain it.

These are the kinda of things that I think Westerners have more of a struggle with, and as a person who considers himself Taoist, I was wondering if you could sort of westernize this concept for me? I think I get it, but as you mentioned earlier, I sometimes come to the idea of doing nothing being the answer, and I don't think that is EXACTLY it.....
Dk

Jolixte
January 21st, 2005, 04:19 PM
Kind of unimportant question, but it thought it was Tao Te Ching, not dao de jing?
Both are correct. Chinese chararcters don't translate directly to the roman (??) alphabet.

MoonDragn
January 21st, 2005, 05:17 PM
Actually, Its both. Dao De Jing is the mandarin pronounciation. Tao Te Ching is the Cantonese pronounciation. Both are aproximate sounds anyway, the real sound in mandarin is Daow Dur Jing.

Darakash
January 21st, 2005, 05:21 PM
Actually, Its both. Dao De Jing is the mandarin pronounciation. Tao Te Ching is the Cantonese pronounciation. Both are aproximate sounds anyway, the real sound in mandarin is Daow Dur Jing.

Okey doke, well, as I stated, it was an unimportant question, I was just curious....do you have any thoughts on the other part of my post?
DK

MoonDragn
January 21st, 2005, 05:24 PM
Oh, yes. Taoism has alot to do with balance. The concept of osmosis is a good way to think of it. It talks about going from one opposite to another naturally as part of nature. In this case by trying too hard to understand the way, you have defined the undefinable. It is an open concept. one without real form. It is neither vast and unlimited nor small and restricting.

In terms of Physics... Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. One can never know the exact position or velocity of an electron. This is because when you make a measurement on a subatomic level, there is an uncertainty caused by disturbing the system through your measurements.

In the same way, when you try to know the tao, you alter it, making it unknowable.

CleftOfLight
January 26th, 2005, 08:06 AM
I like taoism very much.It helps to see things in there simplicity.

StarSpiral
February 17th, 2005, 05:57 PM
Thanks for the link! I've read Tao of Pooh a number of years ago but was just thinking I should read it again. I've been about tao recently as I have been reading Ursula K LeGuin's Dispossessed for a course and she incorporates a lot of taoist principles into her work (as well as physics)

~ Monk ~
February 18th, 2005, 07:43 PM
Cool topic, just so happens i was doing some research on Taoism the other day and came across this site: www.truetao.org (http://www.truetao.org) it is really informative.
True Tao is, in my humble opinion, one of if not the finest Taoist web sites out there. I was just about to mention it when I saw your post. :D