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View Full Version : "I Want it Now" from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory



loopy
October 2nd, 2001, 11:15 PM
I love this song. While it obviously presented Veruca as a spoiled brat (rightly so), I think there are other things to consider. So I'm dissecting lyrics here, feel free to jump in. :D First is the whole song, uninterrupted, then there's my interpretation with the chopped up quotes.

And um... I get weird when I'm bored.



Spoken: (Veruca) I want a golden goose!

Gooses, geeses, I want my geese to lay gold eggs for Easter.

Spoken: (Veruca's Father) It will, sweetheart

At least a hundred a day.

Spoken: (Veruca's Father) Anything you say

And by the way…

Spoken: (Veruca's Father) What?

I want a feast

Spoken: (Veruca's Father) You ate before you came to the factory

I want a bean feast

Spoken: (Veruca's Father) Oh, one of those

Cream buns and doughnuts and fruitcake with no nuts so good you could go nuts.

Spoken: (Veruca's Father) You can have all those things when you get home

No, now!
I want a ball
I want a party
Pink macaroons and a million balloons and performing baboons and
Give it to me now.
I want the world,
I want the whole world.
I want to lock it all up in my pocket
It's my bar of chocolate
Give it to me now!
I want today
I want tomorrow
I want to wear 'em like braids in my hair and I don't want to share 'em !!
I want a party with roomfuls of laughter
Ten thousand ton of ice cream
And if I don't get the things I am after
I'm going to scream!
I want the works,
I want the whole works!
Presents and prizes and sweets and surprises of all shapes and sizes,
And now!
Don't care how I want it now!
Don't care how I want it now!

And now here's what I think:



Spoken: (Veruca) I want a golden goose!

Veruca wants the Golden Goose. She doesn't want just an ordinary, white goose. She wants what's unique, special, extraordinary, possibly symbolizing her need to stand out and be an individual in an age of conformity.

The golden color can be thought of as masculine, representing power, success, acheivement, and of course money: Veruca's desire and to be successful, possibly influnced by her well-to-do businessman father.


Gooses, geeses, I want my geese to lay gold eggs for Easter.

The egg, of course, a child. Here this could be thought of as Veruca's mother instincts, her nurturing nature. In another aspect, the Goose could represent her father, and the egg herself. The Goose is success acheived, and Veruca is the Goose's Egg. Again, she wants the egg to be golden, relating back to the beginning... she wants to have what's special, and [b]be[/i] what's special, successful, etc.


I want a feast

Feasts represent merriment, togetherness. Veruca wants a joyous occassion. She's the classic poor little rich girl. She yearns for love.


Spoken: (Veruca's Father) You ate before you came to the factory

I want a bean feast

She wants a different kind of feast from those she's used to. She wants possibly a bigger family, more joy from the heart rather than from the bank.


Cream buns and doughnuts and fruitcake with no nuts so good you could go nuts.

"So good you could go nuts..." Even though she has everything, she's stifled by the perfection, the way everything is handed to her. She wants to do something for herself every once in a while. Possibly why she wants the Golden Goose; she wants to work for things the way her father did. She makes all her demands because nothing actually satisfies her. She keeps asking in hopes that the next thing will be fulfilling, will fill the hole inside her, but to no avail.


No, now!

She's determined. It's admirable, really.


I want a ball
I want a party
Pink macaroons and a million balloons and performing baboons and

Same as with the feast.


Give it to me now.
I want the world,
I want the whole world.

She's driven, she knows what she wants.


I want to lock it all up in my pocket
It's my bar of chocolate
Give it to me now!

Control issues. Veruca has a desire to control everything around her. But she can't control the things she really wants. She makes people give her these things in hopes that she can.


I want today
I want tomorrow

Definitely showing Veruca's fear of death. She's afraid tomorrow won't come.


I want to wear 'em like braids in my hair and I don't want to share 'em !!

Control issues again. She also wants today and tomorrow to be closest to her head, her source of wisdom. Shows she's goal-oriented.


I want a party with roomfuls of laughter
Ten thousand tons of ice cream

Goes back to the feast, wanting merriment, and wanting the unattainable.


And if I don't get the things I am after
I'm going to scream!

Another admirable quality: she's not afraid to feel or express anger. She realizes it's a valuable, necessary part of life.


Don't care how I want it now!
Don't care how I want it now!

Obviously unafraid of the consequences. She's a brave little toaster, but karma might come back to kick her in the butt one day.

loopy
October 2nd, 2001, 11:55 PM
Oh, on another note, I'd also like to add that I think the Oompa Loompas are self-righteous uppity-ups. Sure, they help get everyone back to normal (or at least we *think* so, we never see it) but they waste time singing about it first. So preachy.


You will live in happiness too
Like the Oompa Loompa doom-pa-dee-do

Like they're perfect or something. Sheesh. :rolleyes:

SpikesPet5150
October 3rd, 2001, 03:41 AM
I have an irrational fear of Oomp Loompa's... creepy little bastards.
~Bree