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Thread: Pagan Themed Fiction

  1. #61
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    I'd also recommend S.M. Stirling's two trilogies. Well, the first one, at least. I've only gotten around to the first book of the second trilogy because I was worried if I picked up the second, I'd never get any work done on my thesis since I'd obviously have to reread them all for the fourth or fifth time...

    There are a few great easter eggs for history buffs and geeks in there. A certain infamous how-to list comes to mind...

  2. #62
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    I hearted the Circle of Three series by Isobel Bird growing up, along with most of Tamora Pierce's books (which were often centered about warriors, magick users -- usually strong female characters to boot...and very present affecting-the-characters'-world...Gods and Goddesses). Charles De Lint is pretty fascinated with magick and pagan concepts, for the more mature audience who likes heavier reading.
    I heart heart heart Jim Butcher's Dresden Files...which is centered around a private detective who's a wizard.
    I liked Lynne Ewing's Daughters of the Moon series when I was younger..even though it's somewhat wishy washy, it's a YA series that focuses on these teenage girls who're daughters of the Goddess Selene, they have powers and basically fight evil and darkness.
    K.A.Applegate's Everworld series, another YA fiction selection, focuses on these teenagers who're sucked into a rip in the fabric of reality, basically, and find themselves half stuck in a world where Gods and all the creatures in myth exist.
    Monica Furlong wrote a trilogy about a witch in olde time Britain and the children she adopted.
    Jane Yolen writes alot of stuff that can ONLY be described as pagan fiction...like one of my favorites; The Wild Hunt, which is a dark children's book.
    Wizard in Seattle by Kay Hooper was pretty good, despite the fact it came from a writer that typically writes romances. O_O

    I hope this helps.
    Last edited by WildThing; September 30th, 2009 at 08:04 PM.
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  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC Destroyer of Worlds View Post

    Sara Douglass Series:
    Axis trilogy
    1: Battle Axe (Wayfarer Redemption Book 1 in US)
    2: Enchanter
    3: Starman
    Wayfarer trilogy
    1:Sinner
    2: Pilgrim
    3: Crusader

    Great books, unbelievable books, loved em.
    also by Sara Douglass- the Troy Game series, which is better than it looks. And the books are quite large, which is a big plus for me, with a mix of Greek and Celthic mythos.
    1. Hades' Daughter
    2. Gods' Concubine
    3. Darkwitch Rising
    4. Druid's Sword

    and while this is a bit embarrassing, I seem to recall The Heart of The Fire by Cerridwen Fallingstar to have been a decent read, ignoring the undercurrent of WTF...has been a few years though.

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  4. #64
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    Discworld Series by Terry Pratchett
    American Gods by Neil Gaiman
    Velgarth Novels by Mercedes Lackey

    I'm not a huge fan of the last one. She's alright, but tends towards Feminist Prose which I am not a fan of.

  5. #65
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    Was just going to say Terry Prattchetts books had folk lore in them mixed with sci fi and lots of black humor.

    Any one else read Nation yet its so so so so so so good it left me feeling all warm and fuzzy and sad when i finished it, if you like Pratchette its a must read its his best book to date and i'm not sure how many more he'll be able to push out befor his condition takes him to far to be able to write.

    Also the Watch serise of books is really good they are russian but have been translated to english and there are two films with subtitles and dubs.

    I lub you edit button
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  6. #66
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    I've read a couple of Norse-themed ones:

    Norse Code by Greg Van Eekhout - IMO, his use of the source material can get a little...corny...at times, but I was entertained. (His portrayal of one of the Jotun women is...creepy...to say the least.)

    A Companion to Wolves by Sarah Monette and Elizabeth Bear -- Originally it was a satire on "companion animal" stories (a la Dragonriders of Pern) but basically all you need to know is: massive wolves + M/M relationships + elves and trolls = this book. I loved it, personally.

  7. #67
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    Today I just finished "Dies the Fire" by SM Stirling, and wow I can't wait to get my hands on the sequel! Anne Bishop's Dark Jewel series was also sickly fabulous.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chicory_Witch View Post
    Today I just finished "Dies the Fire" by SM Stirling, and wow I can't wait to get my hands on the sequel! Anne Bishop's Dark Jewel series was also sickly fabulous.
    Those are great books... they are a great alternate history story... I loved them and it made me think what I would do if that happened
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  9. #69
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    These books have a goddess theme, and I very much enjoyed them:

    The Chronicles of the Necromancer by Gail Z. Martin
    1. Summoner
    2. The Blood King
    3. Dark Lady's Chosen

  10. #70
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    One of my all time favorites is The Way of the Witch trilogy, by Jan Siegel (real name Amanda Hemingway). The individual books are named:

    Prospero's Children
    The Dragon Charmer
    The Witch Queen
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