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Thread: Granny Magic

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    846
    I second the recommendation of the Foxfire books for folk wisdom and herbal remedy. You may also be able to find local lore / folk customs and remedy books at your library in the local history section. I know I've found a number at mine- Hoosier Home Remedies is one that I can recall from my locale. http://www.amazon.com/Hoosier-Home-R.../dp/0911198776
    Libris

    "Kindness is more important than wisdom, and the recognition of this is the beginning of wisdom." ~Theodore Rubin

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In a state of flux
    Age
    43
    Posts
    3,386
    This is an excellent book, and discusses Granny Women as well as all sorts of folk magic & superstition handed down from generation to generation. Having been born in & lived in Arkansas for most of my life, and having travelled around the Ozarks quite a bit, I can attest to the fact that it's much like Voodoo or Hoodoo in Louisiana....even the most devout Christians still believe in some of this old magic. Shoot, when my daughter was having trouble with teething pains, my own Daddy told me about how his mother was told by his nanny to plant cotton seed under the back porch to ease his teething pains. Folk remedies & magic still have a fairly big presence in the South & in more rural areas of the country in general. What in interesting subject!


  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    47
    Can't remember the author name, but I heard of a newer book on this topic called staubs and ditchwater.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Greencastle IN
    Age
    28
    Posts
    3,223
    The Foxire series is excellent for everything pertaining to Appalatchia.

    I'm not a granny but do practice much of what is so labeled. There are male practitioners in those parts, though it's the home remedies which usually survive.
    Tsalagi Nvwoti Didahnvwesgi Ale Didahnesesgi
    (Cherokee medicine practitioner of left and right hand paths)
    anikutani.stfu-kthx.net - The Anikutani Tradition

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