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Thread: Taliesin, god or just Historical figure?

  1. #1
    Labrynth's Avatar
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    Taliesin, god or just Historical figure?

    I was posting on a forum about my patron deities, Brigid and Taliesin, someone posed the question,

    "Isn't Taliesin a legendary bard rather than a deity?"

    I personally see him as a deity, being reborn from Cerridwen gave him this status. But it made me think about it.
    Personal opinions??
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  2. #2
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    My mom views him as part of the Cerridwen story and as a deity. I am neutral about it, since I am not as drawn to that path.

    Quote Originally Posted by Labrynth View Post
    I was posting on a forum about my patron deities, Brigid and Taliesin, someone posed the question,

    "Isn't Taliesin a legendary bard rather than a deity?"

    I personally see him as a deity, being reborn from Cerridwen gave him this status. But it made me think about it.
    Personal opinions??

    (Thanks Flaire!)





  3. #3
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    The poems that are attributed to him are considered to be by one historical personage (as it were), so there is likely to have been someone who was known as Taliesin, or given that name at some point. Whatever the case, Taliesin has become a legendary figure as well.

    The tale of his transformation is in keeping with his role as a bard - fire was considered to be an agent of Otherworldly inspiration and the cooking pot that Gwion tends could be likened to the creative process whereby the bard transforms his inspiration into something fit for human consumption, just as cooking something does; so the tale could be seen as a mythological interpretation of how he became a bard and came to master the creative process.

    The tale bears a lot of similarities with Fionn from Irish myth, and Cu Chulainn goes through a different sort of transformative process to become a warrior (after which he also takes on a different name). It's a common motif so I wouldn't consider any of them to be gods, personally, though it's possible that they have semi-divine origins at least.

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