Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Green Witches, I need your help!

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In phoenix feathers
    Age
    39
    Posts
    172
    I'll throw in one more bit of advice... Look into companion gardening a bit. There are some plants that love each other and some that will fight each other. Which explains why some of my potted gardens didn't do so well I just found out there is a whole list of this last week! I think most herbs get along fairly well, but onion (chives) and sage don't like each other (if I remember right). Another benifit is that you make better use of your space this way, too. Hope that helps some!
    Make awkward sexual advances, not war.



  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,948
    Great thread!

    Just one more thing to consider - it is probably better not to think of buying fresh culinary herbs from a supermarket to plant out. I know that they are often very cheap but I seem to remember reading somewhere that in order to get them to look healthy, each pot actually contains lots of smaller plants rather than one big one. So your best bet for plants is probably a nursery/garden centre.

    Good luck with it all - perhaps you could post some pictures when you have got your garden up and running?
    "First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win" - Mahatma Gandhi

    When I despair, I remember that all through history the ways of truth and love have always won. There have been tyrants, and murderers, and for a time they can seem invincible, but in the end they always fall. Think of it--always - Gandhi

    My friends worship the ground I walk on!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    New England.
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,510
    I haven't found seedlings to be THAT difficult to work with, personally. If you want to start your babies from seed, the best thing to do is to get some of those Jiffy planters, specifically, the trays that have the clear plastic lids and the peat discs. It simulates a greenhouse environment, and if you follow the instructions, the plants will come up beautifully. They're super-easy to use, and everything I planted using those things came up beautifully. You want to keep them covered completely until you start seeing green, then crack the lid a little, then a little more, and then when they're getting bigger, remove the lid. Then take them outside for some "visits". Then leave them outside, and then, when they're a decent size and it's a good time of year, you can either transfer them to some peat pots (where mine are right now) or you can put them straight in the ground.

    The trays are also reusable; you can buy one big tray or a couple smaller trays, depending on how many plants you want, and just reuse them year after year.
    The possibilities are endless.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by Bird View Post
    Lavender is very difficult to start from seed, it's generally better to propagate it from cuttings, same with rosemary. Sage from seed is easier, although germination is erratic. I find thyme easy to grow from seed, my oregano self seeds everywhere as does my lemonbalm, so I just dig up the seedlings and pot on to pass on to other folks. Chives and basil are really easy to grow from seed too.
    I've had mixed results with germination too, depending on the species. Some plants like borage and lovage germinate like crazy- it seems like every seed I plant grows. For others (I'm looking at you horehound!) I have to plant a whole 12-pack and feel extremely lucky if I get one seedling. Still, I prefer to grow mine from seed. There are so many herbs that are difficult to find in stores- borage, hyssop, horehound are just a few I've never seen in the store. Also, some plants just don't take transplanting well and so they have to be grown in place, from seed.

    For me, the biggest problem with growing from seed is dampening off, when fungal blooms in the soil kill off newly emerging seedlings. To counter act this I remove the greenhouse lid from the seedling tray as soon as the baby plants are up and put them out in the sun. This discourages fungal growth and I've had pretty good results with it. They still need to be kept moist though and not having the lid on means they need to be watered more often.

    I really love having herbs around though. Even when I lived in an apartment I would have felt lost without my little pot of herbs.
    Libris

    "Kindness is more important than wisdom, and the recognition of this is the beginning of wisdom." ~Theodore Rubin

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tahlequah, Okalhoma
    Age
    64
    Posts
    24
    i've gardened all my life. it's what i do for a living. all the advice ye've received is good. look into the companion planting. plants do better when it's not monoculture. and rosemary can take quite a bit of cold so long as ye keep her feet dry. perfect drainage will help a rosemary make it through the winter. i've had rosemary rated to survive -10 degrees die on me just because my soil has so much clay. matter of fact, i keep the rosemary in a pot to bring inside over the winter. i've got a walk in closet with lights and shelves for plants i can't leave out over the winter and so i have a place to start seedlings early.

    as a beginner i'd strongly suggest starting with seedlings. from a nursery they are probably already hardened off. lowes would probably be a good place to buy seedlings, but stay away from wal mart seedlings. their plant care is pretty abysmal. i've a local nursery i can get most plants i want from, but they are not very knowledgeable for the plants i look for.

    i know this is an old thread but i finally saw it and wanted to respond....
    Gardener, Martial Artist, Immortal

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Do you know what happens to a toad when it gets struck by lightening?
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,793
    I know that this is going to sound a bit strange, but my grandmother would not allow any female near her garden while the were on their "cycle". I never understood why until I started my own garden.
    I can grow anything and grow it well, but when it's "that time", everything I touch dies.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    South East USA
    Posts
    5
    Ive just moved into a house with a yard and have the same gardening goal. I have a book that I have found invaluble for info concerning growing, harvesting, and prepping herbs as well as herb saftey and uses. Its called "The Herb Bible" by Jennie Harding. It is one of the first books on herbs i ever owned and i have yet to find any other with so much info.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    A lost soul, swimming in a fishbowl
    Age
    47
    Posts
    7,539
    My grandpa was like that too. I chalked it up to being old-school Italian. LOL

    I tried to grow things this year, but life was so crazy (sick parents, work, etc.) that I didn't take proper care of my plants. I feel guilty and apologized to them a lot. Maybe next year.
    It's been minutes, it's been days. It's been all that I remember. <3

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •