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Thread: Looking for runes in nature

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Looking for runes in nature

    I have found it useful, on several occasions, to look for rune signs in the natural world around me. There are a number of ways you can find and use naturally-occurring runes. Look for them where lines cross in nature. The runes - at least the Elder Futhark, which is all I can vouch for - have straight lines; they don't curve. So look for branches of trees, cracks in the ice, blades of grass, cracked stone, trunks of trees, and other places where the right shapes might occur. Also, be free to let your mind see what it needs to see. You might see a configuration of branches that looks like any number of runes superimposed (ehwaz and mannaz, kenaz and gebo, isa and anything with a vertical line, and so forth). If you just relax and let your spirit choose, you'll see what you need to see and filter out what's not important.

    You can look for such signs around your home - or at some other important location. I once saw berkana at a friend's house shortly before she became pregnant. I saw hagalaz at our old house when we were about to experience some delays in moving. Signs may change from season to season or even day to day, so watch for any differences.

    You can ask a question or think about a challenging issue and then take a walk in a natural location. As you go, look for any runes (or other signs) that help you find the answers you seek.

    Don't just think you can receive signs, either. You can arrange plants and other natural objects to form runic signs. And there are many places to mark single runes or bindrunes - both obviously and inconspicuously. It helps, of course, to meditate on these runes too.

    I've had several pivotal experiences with finding runes around me, and I know others must have experienced this phenomenon too. Please tell about it if this has happened to you; I'd love to know how other people use this practice.
    Blessings,
    P. Rex

    My website: http://www.bookofspirals.com
    My blog: http://www.bookofspirals.com/blog
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  2. #2
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    Thank you Scott! Very eye-opening to me, as I am always looking at shapes while I am out walking or just looking around. I just need to learn my runes so I can identify them and interpret them.

    What is the best way to go about this? How would you recommend I start? I have very limited exposure to them.
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  3. #3
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    As with any new symbol set, make sure you take the time you need. That isn't hard with runes. There are only twenty-four in the Elder Futhark set (less in some other sets). I recommend you focus on one at a time, learning perhaps one a week. Make sure you learn the shape as well as the keywords (and, I recommend, the relevant passages from the rune poems, but people sometimes want to hold off on that until they know keywords). As for a good text for beginners, I started with Mountfort's book Nordic Runes, and I still use it all the time. I also recommend you do novel things with the rune to help your brain retain its information - like sketching it or writing a word that begins with it or just hanging it on your wall or mirror where you'll see it every morning. I also recommend meditating on each rune or thinking about each one before bedtime so you are learning them in your sleep. But that isn't essential. Look at the posts for each rune on this board too; there is some very helpful information here.
    Blessings,
    P. Rex

    My website: http://www.bookofspirals.com
    My blog: http://www.bookofspirals.com/blog
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  4. #4
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    Every time it hails.

    Little patterns, such as finding Futhark in the mundane, are part of what makes nature worth revering.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    As a student of Japanese, I have to learn symbols almost daily. Here's different ways I go about it:
    1. Copying them over and over on paper (teeedious but works)
    2. Flash cards (VERY useful and easy to make - it's just a bunch of same-sized papers with stuff drawn on 'em after all :P)
    3. Pictures. For example, in hiragana, the symbol for つ (tsu) kind of looks like a tsunami wave. This is where your imagination can come into play :D
    4. Sayings. Come up with one-line poems for the runes if the above methods don't help.

    I tend to use something different for each character. Tsu was easy to remember by picture, but copying it over and over probably wouldn't do me much good. Mix and match methods! :D
    If someone knows of better methods, I'll be stalking this thread. XD Japanese has an upward of 70,200+ characters, so yeeeah. I'll never be done.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Massachusetts, USA
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    I can’t believe there’s a topic on this.

    For the past few years I've been finding a particular symbol in the woods. I had never heard of runes until I started trying to find what this symbol was.

    1) I found this mark on a quartz stone in the woods (which has since been dug up and stolen).
    2) A deer pawed out that same mark in the snow 2 winters ago, right over where the quartz had been.
    3) I found that same mark on a small piece of quartz which somehow showed up on my kitchen floor 3 years ago.
    4) I've recently found a signature on an old "Indian" deed selling the town of Salem, MA to the whites, which looks to me to be the same 3-pronged symbol. I have the Native American woman's name, and I can trace her father and grandmother back to the area where I have found the symbol in quartz and in the snow.
    5) In looking into Italian Witchcraft (my roots are Sicilian), I found a picture of a pentacle with a pentagram on it, and in the center of the pentagram is this same symbol. I believe it is Algiz.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    8
    Here's an update on the rune I've been seeing, if anyone gives a ...
    These woods are still very active, as they have been for the 20 years I've hiked them.
    Recently I found connection to the Salem With Trials of 1692

    Not sure how I missed this over the past few years of research I’ve been doing on these woods….
    Abigail Faulkner was accused and convicted of witchcraft in the Salem witch trials.
    (Her daughters were also arrested and jailed but their lives were spared because they were 8 and 10 years old.)
    This woman was sentenced to be hanged but was not put to death because she was pregnant.
    By the time the baby was born 19 people had been convicted of being witches and were killed.
    After being jailed for about 4 months she was released, as the witch craze died down.

    When this baby (which arguably saved her life) was an adult he purchased and lived on the land which I hike and see all this stuff. It was in their family for over 200 years and can be clearly documented.

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