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Thread: Celtic links

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by M˛rag Elasaid NÝ Dh˛mhnaill
    But that doesn't mean we don't know where the Basques came from, just not sure where their language came from.
    Exactly.

    Quote Originally Posted by M˛rag Elasaid NÝ Dh˛mhnaill
    I have heard that about the Basque's before though. I've also heard that there are some people who have suggested a link between the Basque's and the Picts. ~shrugs~
    Since the Basque language is isolated linuistically, people are always trying to link it to something else. Personally I go with the theory that Basque is a remnant of the pre-IE substrate languages that seem to have preceeded yhe takeover by Celtic and Germanic and in general IE ones. Ligurian is another example, although its likely that Ligurian is in fact para-Celtic.
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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nantonos
    I didn't say you were either.

    As I said, once you learned new languages, your genetic structure did not change nor did your place of birth. Genetics and language knowledge are not causally related. Thus, a population can take on a new language, or a new cultural component, without having to entirely replace that population with a different one from a different place or with different genetic makeup.

    Which is not to say that there isn't often a correlation between them. But correlatio is an association, not a cause.



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  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nantonos
    Exactly.

    Since the Basque language is isolated linuistically, people are always trying to link it to something else. Personally I go with the theory that Basque is a remnant of the pre-IE substrate languages that seem to have preceeded yhe takeover by Celtic and Germanic and in general IE ones. Ligurian is another example, although its likely that Ligurian is in fact para-Celtic.
    What do you mean by para-Celtic?

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by M˛rag Elasaid NÝ Dh˛mhnaill
    What do you mean by para-Celtic?
    Showing some of the same sound laws that characterise Celtic languages without necessarily sharing an immediate common ancestor (ie, not discounting independent evolution).

    Its a fancy way of saying "kinda" when it comes down to it
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  5. #55
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    My book i'm reading on Welch history says the DNA of the Welch is related to the Basques. The Welch adopted the Celtic language of Brython. Both are pre-Celtic. I am going to have to read more & find out who they are & where they came from?

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by omar
    My book i'm reading on Welch history says the DNA of the Welch is related to the Basques. The Welch adopted the Celtic language of Brython. Both are pre-Celtic. I am going to have to read more & find out who they are & where they came from?
    Can you say what the title of the book is, and who the author is? Does the book have any references?

    Most of what you quoted is incorrect, so it would help to know which book it is. The Welsh 'came from' where they are now, pretty much. The Welsh language is indeed developed from Brythonic; both Welsh and Brythonic are Celtic languages. Basque is not Celtic and indeed not Indo-European.

    Without more precise details its not possible to evaluate the genetic material you allude to.
    Last edited by Nantonos; July 16th, 2005 at 05:56 PM.
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  7. #57
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    The book is "A History of Wales" by J.E. Lloyd. With a intoduction by Jessica Jahiel. It is she who says the DNA of the Welch & Basques are the same. They both are from the earliest Paleolithic inhabitants. I never heard of the Paleolithic people? She says the Celts over ran the Welch & they adopted the Brithonic language & are part Celt & part Paleolithic. I think i'll give up history it's to dang confusing.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by omar
    The book is "A History of Wales" by J.E. Lloyd. With a intoduction by Jessica Jahiel. It is she who says the DNA of the Welch & Basques are the same. They both are from the earliest Paleolithic inhabitants. I never heard of the Paleolithic people? She says the Celts over ran the Welch & they adopted the Brithonic language & are part Celt & part Paleolithic. I think i'll give up history it's to dang confusing.
    If the Celts adopted the Brythonic language, what did they speak before? The Paeleolithic poeople are 'old stone age' in contrast to Neolithic 'new stone age'. Both being definitions based on material culture, not language and not ethnicity.
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  9. #59
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    I just read your PM, yes I looked it up it is Welsh not Welch. My hillbilly spelling? The Italians don't speak Roman anymore either. Some Native Americans have lost there native language too. There may be many people who have been over run & integrated. The Black Irish are a cross of Irish & a Moorish colony that was once on the coast of Irland. But they speak Irish not Moorish.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by omar
    I just read your PM, yes I looked it up it is Welsh not Welch. My hillbilly spelling? The Italians don't speak Roman anymore either. Some Native Americans have lost there native language too. There may be many people who have been over run & integrated.
    All of which demonstrates that the language spoken by a people can change. However, it doesn't realy help with the specific question here. As I said, 'Paleolithic' is a cultural label not a linguistic one. A people stop being Paleolithic once they have shaped stone tools and become Neolithic.
    History teaches us this: no-one learns anything from history



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