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Thread: The Importance of Bones in Traditional Witchcraft

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    in the astral
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    I use bones for getting in touch with my ancestors and I also have some for divination. As for that video... I believe that they maybe having a good ol time with someones past..
    I know several witches and even I have a skull on my altar, although mine is actually a plastic skull but large size, used for ancestor honoring. I can't afford a real one and yes you can buy/purchase skulls and other real human bones at The Bone Room http://www.boneroom.com/ or Skulls Unlimited http://www.skullsunlimited.com/ and it is not illegal to have or to own real human bones.
    I don't nor do my other witchcraft friends use our skulls human or animal as spook factors. Also most stangs have a animal skull usually a ram/calf/goat skull on it. Wands are used sometimes, some have several while others don't use them at all. I know someone who makes a new wand each time she feels she needs one.. and never uses the same wand twice - spells, rituals or whatever she is doing.
    Many of the items in the video were actually used for spell work rather than altar tools. The big horned skull does not mean that they/he worshiped the horned god, most likely it was where he had his fetch residing as a good possibility. I have heard of all of the items in the video although I have not personally used all of them. Each persons witchcraft is very personal even if you would belong to a coven that practices witchcraft, and could very well represent a person in Traditional Cornish Witchcraft.
    Last edited by Kalioppee; April 20th, 2011 at 08:26 PM. Reason: clairfing some points

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    134
    Quote Originally Posted by Kalioppee View Post
    I use bones for getting in touch with my ancestors and I also have some for divination. As for that video... I believe that they maybe having a good ol time with someones past..
    I know several witches and even I have a skull on my altar, although mine is actually a plastic skull but large size, used for ancestor honoring. I can't afford a real one and yes you can buy/purchase skulls and other real human bones at The Bone Room http://www.boneroom.com/ or Skulls Unlimited http://www.skullsunlimited.com/ and it is not illegal to have or to own real human bones.
    I don't nor do my other witchcraft friends use our skulls human or animal as spook factors. Also most stangs have a animal skull usually a ram/calf/goat skull on it. Wands are used sometimes, some have several while others don't use them at all. I know someone who makes a new wand each time she feels she needs one.. and never uses the same wand twice - spells, rituals or whatever she is doing.
    Many of the items in the video were actually used for spell work rather than altar tools. The big horned skull does not mean that they/he worshiped the horned god, most likely it was where he had his fetch residing as a good possibility. I have heard of all of the items in the video although I have not personally used all of them. Each persons witchcraft is very personal even if you would belong to a coven that practices witchcraft, and could very well represent a person in Traditional Cornish Witchcraft.
    Very much so!!!!^_^

    Thanks for the links. I'm going to have to look around a bit.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tennessee
    Age
    33
    Posts
    4,482
    It must be a cornish thing. There are references to use of animal skins but every little of bones. The crane bag used by córrguinecs and the bull skin used in imbas forosnai. All though the second involved chewing a piece of meat as well, but still.
    As I was walking all alane, I heard twa corbies making a mane, the tane unto the nither did day, What sall we gang and dine the day?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    107
    Most Trad Witches don't deal with the 'lord and lady' mythology of Wicca, but a number do deal with the Horned God and some Witch Goddess in some way. The Cornish witches in that video honor what they call 'the Bucca' which is a kind of androgynous horned landspirit who aids them to contact other spirits at need. So the horned skull there is probably a contact for the Bucca. You can find that stuff in Gemma Gary's very good book "Traditional Witchcraft: A Cornish Book of Ways".

    Traditional sorcery is always concerned with the Dead. The spirits of the Dead become the allies and agents of the witch, and are often contacted through the symbol of bone. In ancient sorcery specific spirits were sometimes enslaved by mages using their bones as object links. I suppose most of us would reject that sort of thing these days. Still, one can use real or symbolic bones as talismanic objects to link one's shrine to the spirits of the Dead. That's probably the main purpose of bones displayed in a ritual context.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tennessee
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    I guess it would depend on which branch of traditional witchcraft you were talking about. I agree that the would not deal with any thing called the lord and lady. But, most traditional witches are or were not pagan at all but rather christain. Or christio pagan if you want to stretch it. Seeing as how in say the 17th-18th centuries. pagan spirits were not likely to feature in witch craft as every one or most of them were christain even if they did pratice what we would call witch craft, they most certinally would not.
    As I was walking all alane, I heard twa corbies making a mane, the tane unto the nither did day, What sall we gang and dine the day?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    107
    I don't generally agree with using the term 'witchcraft' to refer to folk magic. Cunning folk, for instance, are not witches in my opinion.
    This is a knotty semantic issue in modern times, as it has been since Middle English. Rather than type a lot here, see my blog at:
    http://intothemound.blogspot.com/201...olk-magic.html

    A little summary: "Witchcraft" has always referred to a religious system, whether the pre-Christian ways of an Old English wicce or the devil-worshipping ways of a medieval-style witch. Traditional practitioners of folk-magic almost never refer to themselves as 'witches' unless they're involved in some religious context for it. Almost everyone who consciously wears the term 'witch' now is in some sort of magico-religious relationship with spirits outside the Christian system. There are plenty of other terms for folk magic, that don't entangle it with the weird archetype of the witch. I don't think mixing the two does any good.

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