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Thread: Why do People that practice Traditional Witchcraft not like to be called a witch

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by melodye View Post
    I've never heard that before!
    There's a lot of things that I've never heard before. Traditional Witchcraft seems very interesting even if it's confusing. I know that it's folk tradition and that those that practiced old school witchcraft would put pins in poppets, cast curses, do wishes, healed, protected people from black witches, things like that. It seems that bones are also part of the tradition with the spirit houses and stuff.

    I personally hope that I can go over there and see the Museum. I also read that Traditional Witches believe that Wiccans can't be witches.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoseKitten View Post
    Instead of posting a vague question from some "other" site, why don't you just ask there? None of us can tell you why they do it, because we are not them, and have no context outside of whatever you tell us.
    Sorry about that, RoseKitten. I'm still trying to wrap my head around the whole thing. Of course the video is really cool and I agree not your pink and fluffy kind of witchcraft. I showed my mother the video and she thought it was totally gross, lol .

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sekhmet Soul30 View Post
    How is Cornish Witchcraft part of Wicca? The man that had the video's is part of the Peller Tradition and he was showing off some of the things that was either part of his working tools, like the skulls which he said are spirit houses, wand, more skulls, and things that were part of the Witchcraft Museum. He made it very clear that this isn't pink and fluffy witchcraft but old school.
    One thing you have to remember is the notion of Spirit Houses, Spirit Keepers, Spirit Bodies, etc are all found the world over. Many times deeply rooted in customs that are reflective of ancestor worship and veneration. Many times also associated with death magics or aiding the deceased to cross the viel.

    From a shamanic perspective one often times keeps relics or bones to be used in contacting spirit guides. It also is used to create regalia which is used in tying one to the spirit realm or aiding them in transformation and shapeshifting.

    Yet most of the practices I referenced have nothing to do with "Traditional" witchcraft. Well not in the sense that westernized influences paint anyway.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sekhmet Soul30 View Post
    Let me do a correction on the last post. Here's were I really got the info from about Traditionalists not liking the word witch and considering it an ugly word. Sorry if I might of given you the wrong information but still the link provides some really good information about the difference between Wicca and Witchcraft.

    http://www.spelwerx.com/wvtw.html
    It looks like it's the same article published on both sites, and also just as I have suspected. There's only a few facts stated about Traditional Wicca, and then many repeats of misinformation regarding "modern", (I'm assuming Eclectic) Wicca, and neo-pagan beliefs within the New Age movement. I've noticed a trend among many "Traditional Witches", that attempt to disassociate and "debunk" Wicca with these same references and misinformation, that does nothing more than make them stand out like a sore thumb as someone that has no clue or experience within Wicca, i.e. Traditional Wicca/Gardnerian&Alexandrian Witchcraft.

    First of all, I'm not sure exactly how many of these people actually bothered to pursue Traditional Wicca, but neophytes become aware if its history early on as most covens have recommended reading lists, with requited books such as Hutton's The Triumph of the Moon, and Wicca Magickal Beginnings(That gets into the whole grimoire tradition and occult influence, something that actual historic cunning-folk and charmers, most of actually literate, possessed) to be read. The part involving the Sabbats mentioned as well, the author of the article appears limited on Wiccan history, as it should be well known that the Lesser Sabbats were later additions to the wheel of the year. Many neophytes are required to write essays&theses, requiring study of the Sabbats(essays that don't cease upon initiation in some covens anyway) where it'll be known that the Bricketwood coven incorporated these days, as Gardner's mates wanted more days to party basically.

    There are further indicators that individuals of this sort were never Wiccans, therefore are ignorant to its inner-court tradition. Wicca isn't all "love&light", a lot of the public laws are nothing more than guidelines, and other than its occult influence, does incorporate historic folk traditions. Other than some of the Ozark& Appalachian trads in the States, very rarely have I noticed a genuine "Traditional Witch." Most of them seem to follow paths that they created themselves. Witchcraft is a secular art, therefore most supposed traditions that mention holidays and deities are influenced by Wicca whether they realise it or not.
    Semper Fidelis

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sekhmet Soul30 View Post
    There's a lot of things that I've never heard before. Traditional Witchcraft seems very interesting even if it's confusing. I know that it's folk tradition and that those that practiced old school witchcraft would put pins in poppets, cast curses, do wishes, healed, protected people from black witches, things like that. It seems that bones are also part of the tradition with the spirit houses and stuff.

    I personally hope that I can go over there and see the Museum. I also read that Traditional Witches believe that Wiccans can't be witches.
    I practice Traditional Witchcraft and I am yet to meet one Traditional Witch that does not like the term witch.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MonSno_LeeDra View Post
    One thing you have to remember is the notion of Spirit Houses, Spirit Keepers, Spirit Bodies, etc are all found the world over. Many times deeply rooted in customs that are reflective of ancestor worship and veneration. Many times also associated with death magics or aiding the deceased to cross the viel.

    From a shamanic perspective one often times keeps relics or bones to be used in contacting spirit guides. It also is used to create regalia which is used in tying one to the spirit realm or aiding them in transformation and shapeshifting.

    Yet most of the practices I referenced have nothing to do with "Traditional" witchcraft. Well not in the sense that westernized influences paint anyway.
    I heard the Thai have spirit houses. Thanks for answering and I hope that your weekend is turning out well.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by melodye View Post
    I practice Traditional Witchcraft and I am yet to meet one Traditional Witch that does not like the term witch.
    Thanks for sharing melodye. Since you practice Traditional Witchcraft why is the Full Moons more important than the holidays, or festivals?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Micheál View Post
    It looks like it's the same article published on both sites, and also just as I have suspected. There's only a few facts stated about Traditional Wicca, and then many repeats of misinformation regarding "modern", (I'm assuming Eclectic) Wicca, and neo-pagan beliefs within the New Age movement. I've noticed a trend among many "Traditional Witches", that attempt to disassociate and "debunk" Wicca with these same references and misinformation, that does nothing more than make them stand out like a sore thumb as someone that has no clue or experience within Wicca, i.e. Traditional Wicca/Gardnerian&Alexandrian Witchcraft.

    First of all, I'm not sure exactly how many of these people actually bothered to pursue Traditional Wicca, but neophytes become aware if its history early on as most covens have recommended reading lists, with requited books such as Hutton's The Triumph of the Moon, and Wicca Magickal Beginnings(That gets into the whole grimoire tradition and occult influence, something that actual historic cunning-folk and charmers, most of actually literate, possessed) to be read. The part involving the Sabbats mentioned as well, the author of the article appears limited on Wiccan history, as it should be well known that the Lesser Sabbats were later additions to the wheel of the year. Many neophytes are required to write essays&theses, requiring study of the Sabbats(essays that don't cease upon initiation in some covens anyway) where it'll be known that the Bricketwood coven incorporated these days, as Gardner's mates wanted more days to party basically.

    There are further indicators that individuals of this sort were never Wiccans, therefore are ignorant to its inner-court tradition. Wicca isn't all "love&light", a lot of the public laws are nothing more than guidelines, and other than its occult influence, does incorporate historic folk traditions. Other than some of the Ozark& Appalachian trads in the States, very rarely have I noticed a genuine "Traditional Witch." Most of them seem to follow paths that they created themselves. Witchcraft is a secular art, therefore most supposed traditions that mention holidays and deities are influenced by Wicca whether they realise it or not.
    Interesting. I'm learning a lot from all of you and I thank you all for taking the time out to educate me. Now about the two links this is the last time that I post anything after midnight, seriously. One of the things that I'll admit about Traditional Witchcraft, and I hope that my impression is true, is that there is folk magic done(just like you said that Wicca has). I'm going to be ordering a book from England that talks about Cornish Witchcraft and in one of the video's that was on Youtube there was a woman that practices Traditional Witchcraft that calls herself a witch.

    I forgot her name but she authored the book that I'm going to be buying. One of the things that I don't get is how come a religion that wasn't suppose to be all light and love turned into that. Let me know, as I'm totally confused by how Wicca is practiced now. I know that it's not the same now as it was back then, which really makes one think. I also hope that I made sense. If not, I'll come back in four hours when I know I'm fully awake.

    I'm going to officially call myself one confused person.
    Last edited by Sekhmet Soul30; March 26th, 2011 at 11:05 AM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sekhmet Soul30 View Post
    I heard the Thai have spirit houses. Thanks for answering and I hope that your weekend is turning out well.
    Yeah Spirit Houses are a big business in Thailand, the sad part though is there is a growing movement away from them. The thing about Thai houses though is that they serve two purposes. One is to house the ancestors spirits others are designed to be home to the local spirits of place and land. Sort of tying the whole community together as one.

    Spirit dolls were big in parts of Tibet and the Steppes areas where horse hair dolls and other doll forms were made to house the spirits.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sekhmet Soul30 View Post
    ..One of the things that I don't get is how come a religion that wasn't suppose to be all light and love turned into that. Let me know, as I'm totally confused by how Wicca is practiced now. I know that it's not the same now as it was back then, which really makes one think. I also hope that I made sense. If not, I'll come back in four hours when I know I'm fully awake.

    I'm going to officially call myself one confused person.
    I think the answer to that actually arises from the late 90's early 2000's period with the proliferation of shake and bake Wicca. That period where one choose what they liked and ignored the rest as it didn't do anything for them. That and the ever increasing influence of the New Age movement with its love and white light happy happy slant on everything.

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