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Thread: Opinions please~ "Doomsday 2012 Prophecies" (Merlin and Mother Shipton)

  1. #1
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    Question Opinions please~ "Doomsday 2012 Prophecies" (Merlin and Mother Shipton)

    I have no idea what to make of this. Maybe somebody more well-read in these things could chime in~?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hC9RN91F9to

    For some reason this video creeped me.


    I hope this is in the right section. :D

  2. #2
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    I actually remember this episode

    As for the placing of the thread, Merlin isn't Hellenic (Greek), he's from Celtic pantheons. Even so, I'm going to move this to History

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agaliha View Post
    I actually remember this episode

    As for the placing of the thread, Merlin isn't Hellenic (Greek), he's from Celtic pantheons. Even so, I'm going to move this to History
    Thank you thank you, I knew it was misplaced. It was bugging me XD

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    *shrugs*
    I see nothing particularly noteworthy. Like Nostradamus's prophecies, they are sweeping generalizations that make little sense until after an event has happened, which always seemed to me to defeat the purpose of prophecy. The only indication that some prophecies were accurate is because the narrator said so. I'd be willing to bet if one read the prophecies free of anyone else's interpretations, they'd be left scratching their heads and thinking "WTF was that supposed to mean?" Another thing to keep in mind about predictions: given enough time, just about all of them will come true, so it doesn't necessarily take some great mystical powers to make an accurate prediction, especially if one's standards for accuracy are rather fluid (such as not giving specific dates, names or locations). Moreover, the main person they interviewed, R.J. Stewart, has no scholarly credentials as a historian. His interpretations of historical texts are no more authoritative that those of other laypersons, so I suggest taking his assertions with a few grains of salt. I know he's big into Pagan paths based on Merlin and the Faery Tradition, so I think taking his word on Merlin's prophecies might be like taking a fundamentalist Christian's word on biblical prophecies.
    "I would rather make the gravest of mistakes than surrender my own judgement." -- Cora Munroe in Last of the Mohicans

    "Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing." -- Conan the Barbarian in "Tower of the Elephant" by Robert E. Howard

    "Moral outrage has little effect on a cat." -- Garrison Keillor

    "There aren't many problems than can't be fixed
    with $700 and a .30-06." -- Jeff Cooper. Or maybe it was his daughter Lindy. I can't remember.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Valnorran View Post
    *shrugs*
    I see nothing particularly noteworthy. Like Nostradamus's prophecies, they are sweeping generalizations that make little sense until after an event has happened, which always seemed to me to defeat the purpose of prophecy. The only indication that some prophecies were accurate is because the narrator said so. I'd be willing to bet if one read the prophecies free of anyone else's interpretations, they'd be left scratching their heads and thinking "WTF was that supposed to mean?" Another thing to keep in mind about predictions: given enough time, just about all of them will come true, so it doesn't necessarily take some great mystical powers to make an accurate prediction, especially if one's standards for accuracy are rather fluid (such as not giving specific dates, names or locations). Moreover, the main person they interviewed, R.J. Stewart, has no scholarly credentials as a historian. His interpretations of historical texts are no more authoritative that those of other laypersons, so I suggest taking his assertions with a few grains of salt. I know he's big into Pagan paths based on Merlin and the Faery Tradition, so I think taking his word on Merlin's prophecies might be like taking a fundamentalist Christian's word on biblical prophecies.
    Thanks for posting :D
    This is why I love mysticwicks, things that scare me are easily explained by people who know what they're doing...
    Also, I'm just way too easily scared. I don't know why, honestly.

  6. #6
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    It's easy to look at ancient texts with prophecies and apply them to whatever timeframe you live in. Even the Colloquy of Two Sages "appears" to be pointing as prophecy. Look at lines 175-267 with Ferchertne's response to Nede.
    "Cattle die, kinsmen die, one day you yourself must die.

    I know one thing that never dies:
    the dead man's reputation."


    Havamal- Sayings of the High One

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    There isn't any evidence that either of those people even existed, so I think we're good.

    banner courtesy Faeawyn

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valnorran View Post
    *shrugs*
    I see nothing particularly noteworthy. Like Nostradamus's prophecies, they are sweeping generalizations that make little sense until after an event has happened, which always seemed to me to defeat the purpose of prophecy. The only indication that some prophecies were accurate is because the narrator said so. I'd be willing to bet if one read the prophecies free of anyone else's interpretations, they'd be left scratching their heads and thinking "WTF was that supposed to mean?" Another thing to keep in mind about predictions: given enough time, just about all of them will come true, so it doesn't necessarily take some great mystical powers to make an accurate prediction, especially if one's standards for accuracy are rather fluid (such as not giving specific dates, names or locations). Moreover, the main person they interviewed, R.J. Stewart, has no scholarly credentials as a historian. His interpretations of historical texts are no more authoritative that those of other laypersons, so I suggest taking his assertions with a few grains of salt. I know he's big into Pagan paths based on Merlin and the Faery Tradition, so I think taking his word on Merlin's prophecies might be like taking a fundamentalist Christian's word on biblical prophecies.
    In Shipton's defense, she did predict that women would wear trousers and that we would drive cars. The rest is pretty normal -- kids not listening to parents, fires, floods, and other stuff like that. So I guess look to her for fashion advice, but not predictions.

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