In Gaulish religion, Nantosuelta was a goddess of nature, the earth, fire, and fertility. The Mediomatrici (Alsace, Lorraine) depicted her in art as holding a model house or dovecote, on a pole (a bee hive). Nantosuelta is attested by statues, and by inscriptions. She was sometimes paired with Sucellus. Nantosuelta was also the Goddess of Nature in Lusitanian mythology. In addition, her symbol the raven symbolized her connection as a goddess of the dead.

In this relief from Sarrebourg, near Metz, Nantosuelta, wearing a long gown is standing to the left. In her left hand she holds a small house-shaped object with two circular holes and a peaked roof. Her right hand holds a patera which she is tipping onto a cylindrical altar.

To the right Sucellus stands, bearded, in a tunic with a cloak on his right shoulder. He holds his mallet in his right hand and an olla in his left. Above the figures is a dedicatory inscription and below them in very low relief is bird, of a raven. This sculpture was dated by Reinach (1922, pp. 217–232), from the form of the letters, to the end of the first century or start of the second century.

An altar from Metz has a carving of a woman with similar dress to the Sarrebourg example, also holding a small house on a pole, thus presumed to be Nantosuelta. Sucellus is not shown on this example.

She was associated with the cornucopia.


The inscription (Jufer & Luginbühl p. 129) on the Sarrebourg altar (CIL XIII, 4542) reads:
Deo Svcello /Nantosvelte /Bellavsvs Mas /se Filivs V(otum).S(olvit).L(ibens).M(erito) To the God Sucellus and to Nantosuelta, Bellausus, son of Massa, willingly and deservedly fulfilled his vow.


The inscription on the Metz altar (AE 1896, 0049) says:

In h(onorem) {r} d(omus) d(ivinae) /M(arcus) Tignuarius /v(otum) s(olvit) l(ibens) m(erito) Here the dedication is to the Imperial house, and Nantosuelta is not explicitly mentioned. The visual depiction makes the identification secure.

From: Wiki
Nantosuelta was the Gallic goddess of nature, valley and streams. She was the consort of Sucellus, the god of fertility or prosperity.

The Gaul craftsmen depicted Nantosuelta holding a pole surmounted by dove-cote. Nantosuelta was a mother goddess or fertility goddess because she was seen carrying a cornucopia.

Her symbol was also the raven, which linked her with the dead and the Underworld.

From: Here
Nantosuelta was the consort of Sucellos, the God of Agriculture. Her name means ' Winding River' though her attributes do not show her as a water-deity. Chief amongst these is her little house, usually depicted on a long pole like a sceptre of some kind. Other associated objects include a bird, a bee-hive and honeycombs. The latter certainly have homely connotations and she therefore appears to have been a goddess of hearth and house, well-being and prosperity. Like her husband, she also had nourishment and fertility aspects and sometimes carried a cornucopia. In Britain, she is probably to be found depicted on a small stone from East Stoke in Nottinghamshire. Her partner is clearly Sucellus. The goddess shown has bushy hair and carries a bowlful of apples.

From: Here
Nantosuelta
A Gaulish Goddess: She of the Winding River, She of the Sun-warmed Valley

Nantosuelta is a Gaulish goddess known from an inscribed relief found at Sarrebourg, France where her consort is given as Sucellus. In inconography she is associated with the raven and her function may have been that of a psychopomp (one who transfers the spirits of the departed to the otherworld).

Nantosuelta is known directly from an inscription on a relief (shown above) from Sarrebourg in the Moselle region of France (CIL XIII 04542) where her consort is both named and shown as Sucellus. This inscription reads: Deo Svcello Nantosvelte Bellavsvs Mas se Filivs VSLM (To the God Sucellus and to Nantosuelta, Bellausus, son of Massa, willingly and deservedly fulfilled his vow.) The image shown is interesting in terms of its iconography: In her left hand the goddess holds a small house-shaped object with two circular holes and a peaked roof — a dovecote perhaps? — suspended on a long pole. Her right hand holds a patera (a broad ritual dish used for drinking, primarily in the ritual context of libation) which she is tipping onto a cylindrical altar.

Icongoraphically a similarly-represented goddess is known from an altar at Metz, France and though the goddess is not named she is assumed to be Nantosuelta. n Britain, she is probably to be found depicted on a small stone from East Stoke in Nottinghamshire. In this depiction the goddess has bushy hair and carries a bowlful of apples, reminiscent of continental Nantosuelta's patera. However, it is clear that her consort is Sucellus. The various depictions of this goddess show her holding a pot (which may be an echo of the Celtic cauldron of life and food), or a beehive. She is also often associate with the raven as a familiar (an example of which is shown above). Thus the interpretation of Nantosuelta's iconography is uncertain, for the patera, the house/dovecot and the beehive/cauldron would indicate an association with the home and hearth, with cooking and food. However, the raven is most often associated with war-fertility goddesses. Given the sense of domesticity in Nantosuelta's other iconography it is tempting to think that the raven is used in its fertility rather than its martial context.

FOR THE REST, go HERE: Celtnet


Also see:
MW thead: Nantosuelta


I didn't realize she was worshipped in Alsace, that's where my mother's paternal ancestors are from (Strasbourg, Alsace, etc) How cool. I'm going to try to find more resources!