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Thread: Pulling a rune per day

  1. #41
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    Also Frey, the regent of the gods, took his abode not far from Upsala, where he exchanged for a ghastly and infamous sin-offering the old custom of prayer by sacrifice, which had been used by so many ages and generations. For he paid to the gods abominable offerings, by beginning to slaughter human victims. - Gesta Danorum 3
    Today Freyr is considered by many to be one of the Norse pantheon's most gentle and benevolent gods. But a close look at the surviving lore and folk-customs suggests that once upon a time the golden lord of Vanaheim was honored with human sacrifice. The old folk songs about John Barleycorn cut down so that the grain would grow may hearken back to a time when the fields were fed with the blood of a sanctified victim.

    Before we scream about the barbarism of this practice we may wish to consider it within its cultural context. For our ancestors, the fertility of the land was all-important: a failed crop could mean slow death for an entire village. They offered up life so that life would continue: by giving of their best, they hoped to ensure that Frey would give of his best. The lessons contained within that holy sacrifice can help us to understand His rune, Inguz.


    We should remember that the food we eat died so that we might live. We may avoid shedding blood and eating flesh but we cannot avoid consuming life. The crops on our farms partake of the same vital force which quickens our being - and if you don't believe they have spirits and even sentience, you may want to speak to your local shaman. The sacrifice of John Barleycorn and the Sacred King is re-enacted with every meal you eat. Rather than treating it as a nasty relic of our primitive past, you may do better to see it as a holy mystery. Inguz fattens the animals so they may be slaughtered and brings the crops to fruition that they may be mowed down.

    Inguz is shaped like the vulva through which we make our appearance into this world. Yet it is worth remembering that the day we are born is the day we begin dying. To become embodied is to become mortal: the flowers which blossom in spring must wither with the coming of the frost. But where Ear speaks of death as a grim finality, to Inguz it is just another doorway. The seed buried beneath the frost will send out new life after the ground has thawed. Every end gives rise to a new beginning: every birth is really a rebirth. Meditating upon Inguz can help you focus upon that which you wish to pass down to your descendants and the reasons for which you took on flesh and sinew. (And for those seeking to conceive, Inguz can help put you in touch with a spirit seeking birth and give you the means to carry your pregnancy to fruition).

    Since He is also Lord of Alfheim, Frey's rune can help us in contacting the Alfar and their kindred. In many ways the Eternal Ones, who know neither age nor sickness, are the purest expression of the force of Inguz. The Elves can bless those they favor with prosperity and fertility and curse those who displease them by withdrawing those gifts. By contemplating the mystery of life and its continuation which is contained within Inguz, we can avoid falling into the trap of sentimentalizing them: we can know that their world contains beauty and terror, both of which are equally necessary and equally holy.
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  2. #42
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    In hunter-gatherer cultures the sharing of food helped ensure that everybody got something to eat. Those too old to hunt for game or search for edible plants could live to pass their knowledge and the tribe's history down to the next generations. In agricultural cultures today "barn raising" parties leverage the support of the community for the benefit of its individual members. One of the pillars of Islam is zakat, giving alms to fellow Muslims in need: Proverbs 11:25 informs Jews and Christians that "A generous man will prosper; he who refreshes others will himself be refreshed."

    Gifting is one of the practices which helped humanity to become civilized and which helps maintain our culture and our standard of living. It reinforces our connections to our fellows and provides us with a safety net against inevitable bad times. Fehu is the rune of commerce, the fee which workmen receive for their efforts. Gebo is the rune of gifts, those things which are given away. Yet like Fehu it represents obligations and exchanges - indeed, the demands of Gebo can be far more onerous than a simple bill for services rendered.

    The gifts exchanged in marriage marked the joining of two families. Dowries and bride prices helped the young couple to establish their household and provided insurance to a surviving spouse. It also helped to encourage the survival of the union: should the marriage fail, the gift immediately became due and payable to the givers. Other laws and customs described the passing down of a dowry or dower to heirs and the expectations incurred by those accepting the gift.

    Under feudalism alliances were marked by gifting. A feudal lord might reward a vassal's service with land and the right to collect rents from the tenants thereon. The vassal could then pass this land down to heirs, who could hold it in "fee simple" (Fehu again!). They were entitled to the same privileges their ancestor held, but expected to provide loyalty and service in exchange for their freeholding. Should they betray that trust, their land could be taken away from them.

    In yet another manifestation of Gebo, tribute, a tribe or nation might provide a stronger power with regular gifts of gold, troops or other resources in exchange for peace. These tributes mark the defeated power as servants to the superior force. They help the stronger and weaker alike to avoid costly conflict. But those who give these gifts should know that they will only be accepted for so long as it benefits the stronger: they generally lead to ever-increasing demands and delay rather than avoid the day of reckoning.

    Gifting also marks the boundaries of a community and your relationship with its members. During the holiday season there are those who receive token presents and those who receive larger gifts. Your spouse may get diamond jewelry for Christmas while the paper boy receives $10 and your high school acquaintance in Peoria gets a card: at most workplaces gifts are given to subordinates, not to superiors. And those who complain at length about "welfare states" reserve special horror for the fact that illegal aliens (i.e. those who are not an official part of Our Culture) might receive some benefit from social programs.

    When Gebo shows up in a reading it marks an alliance of some kind: the runes which surround it will tell you more about the costs and rewards of that partnership. They will tell whether you are the recipient or giver of the gift, and what responsibilities will come along with those benefits. You can then decide whether or not the obligation is worth the price... because Gebo teaches us that every gift has a price. Those who rely on charity are at the mercy of those who dispense it, and as Robert A. Heinlein reminds us, "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch." Those who give expect, sooner or later, to receive.
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  3. #43
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    Didn't get to pule a "Rune" yesterday and having trouble going thru to find MW def for this one pulled it from the net. (So many versions and definitions depending on person ugghhh) anyway her is todays:


    The Rune Hagalaz is part of my Rune Meanings series...

    The ancient meaning of the Hagalaz Rune is that of Hail. In the modern day the Hagalaz meaning is concerned with disruptive natural forces, challenges and life changing events.
    In a Rune Reading the Hagalaz Rune is seen as one that can herald disruption, dramatic changes and major challenges. But all of these changes are necessary and once through them you will be strengthened.
    Illness, injury and loss are also associated with the Hagalaz Rune and can indicate poor health, an accident or even death of a loved one. In questions about love and relationships the Hagalaz Rune can herald the death knell to that relationship with the real possibility of third party interference.
    In the area of business, finance and career the Hagalaz Rune can show major setbacks and interruptions to progress.
    Overall the appearance of the Hagalaz Rune is seen as a warning that challenges can be overcome.


    Hagalaz Reversed Meaning

    There isnít a Hagalaz reversed meaning as the Hagalaz Rune cannot be reversed.

    Runes of Magic & Divination

    The Runes of magic and divination have been used throughout the ages to foretell futures and to aid Spell casting and manifestation. Rune secrets are revealed and used for inscribing magical meanings onto candles used in Spell casting.

    Do not use the Hagalaz Rune in any form of positive Magic.

    Hagalaz Rune Correspondences

    The Hagalaz Rune corresponds with the colour light blue, the number 9, the Tarot card of the Tower and the astrological sign of Aquarius. The goddess Urd and the god Heimdall are also associated with the Hagalaz Rune. The element of Water is contained within the female Hagalaz Rune.

    (from Alizones psychic secrets)
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  4. #44
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    Ehwaz

    As the Ice Age ended and the Agricultural Revolution commenced, hunters began mastering the arts of animal husbandry. Sheep, goats and cattle were domesticated for their milk, meat and hides. But the relationship with horses grew especially close thanks to a quirk of equine anatomy - a gap between their front incisors and rear grinding teeth that allowed for placement of a bridle and bit. This meant that horses could be led, directed and even ridden. Plough horses changed the face of farming, while charioteers and nomads on horseback raised and destroyed empires.

    Ehwaz, the horse-rune, often speaks of movement. If Raido is the journey, Ehwaz is the means of transport. This can be as literal (a new vehicle, for example) or metaphorical (i.e. a job which requires extensive travel or even relocation). It can be called upon to move past blockages and to take you away from unpleasant situations or places. But it is a rune which must be directed and controlled, lest you find yourself riding a spooked horse. Ehwaz can provide you the means of escape, but it will be up to you to take the reins.

    An equally important aspect of Ehwaz is domestication. Equestrians cannot overpower or outrun their steeds: they must maintain control through the right mixture of firmness and gentleness. Where Mannaz speaks of partnership between equals, Ehwaz is about the relationship between the tamer and the tamed. This rune can be used for domination works in the same manner as Hoodoo formulas like Bend Over Oil and Commanding Incense. (But be careful, lest you find yourself trying to control a bucking bronco). It can also be used to tame unruly aspects of your own psyche: those suffering from addiction or anger management issues take note. Meditating on Ehwaz can help us understand the deep mysteries of dominance and submission, concepts often misunderstood in a culture which privileges - in theory if not in practice - "equality" and "freedom."

    Odin rode through the Nine Worlds on Sleipner, his eight-legged steed. Ehwaz can also be called upon for spiritual journeying. Combined with Wunjo, Ehwaz can be a powerful tool for inducing ecstatic states: in conjunction with Chalc it can become a steed to carry you on your quest. Much as horse and rider become one unit, Ehwaz can help you to achieve unity with the Divine. This may be as direct as possession (which is called "horsing" for a reason). It may also be a more subtle but no less profound surrender to the Will of the Gods: Ehwaz can help you to take up Their bit and bridle and allow Them to lead you where you need to go.

    If you are overwhelmed and need to call in the cavalry, Ehwaz can be very helpful. Conjoined with Uruz, it can become a rampaging herd which tramples everything in its path. With Thurisaz it can strike with the devastating force of a knight's lance: with Ansuz it can send a message and establish communication behind enemy lines. It can add speed and force to a bind rune, sending your spell galloping toward its goal. It can also be used in glamour workings to make you appear like a "knight in shining armor" or an unstoppable armored charger. Like the horse, Ehwaz can offer assistance in many different situations.

    While it is important to consider the runes which appear in a reading in total rather than as isolated bits of data, it is especially important to do so with Ehwaz. Ehwaz is about the joining of two entities into one. The runes which surround it will tell you who is riding the horse, the destination toward which they ride and the obstacles which stand in their way. Ehwaz often marks an outside force or person coming into play: the surrounding runes will tell you whether the mysterious stranger brings good, ill or some combination thereof.

    [SIGPIC] Kim



  5. #45
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    The Rune Hagalaz is part of my Rune Meanings series...

    The ancient meaning of the Hagalaz Rune is that of Hail. In the modern day the Hagalaz meaning is concerned with disruptive natural forces, challenges and life changing events.
    In a Rune Reading the Hagalaz Rune is seen as one that can herald disruption, dramatic changes and major challenges. But all of these changes are necessary and once through them you will be strengthened.
    Illness, injury and loss are also associated with the Hagalaz Rune and can indicate poor health, an accident or even death of a loved one. In questions about love and relationships the Hagalaz Rune can herald the death knell to that relationship with the real possibility of third party interference.
    In the area of business, finance and career the Hagalaz Rune can show major setbacks and interruptions to progress.
    Overall the appearance of the Hagalaz Rune is seen as a warning that challenges can be overcome.


    Hagalaz Reversed Meaning

    There isn’t a Hagalaz reversed meaning as the Hagalaz Rune cannot be reversed.

    Runes of Magic & Divination

    The Runes of magic and divination have been used throughout the ages to foretell futures and to aid Spell casting and manifestation. Rune secrets are revealed and used for inscribing magical meanings onto candles used in Spell casting.

    Do not use the Hagalaz Rune in any form of positive Magic.

    Hagalaz Rune Correspondences

    The Hagalaz Rune corresponds with the colour light blue, the number 9, the Tarot card of the Tower and the astrological sign of Aquarius. The goddess Urd and the god Heimdall are also associated with the Hagalaz Rune. The element of Water is contained within the female Hagalaz Rune.

    (from Alizones psychic secrets)


    (and it fits to these last few days...) rough days they have been.....

    My sister dies Nov. 30th and I guess the kids are cremating her, not contacted me....sent messages and talked to 2nd party so shall see.

    And on hubbies side his mother died in August and his 2 older sibs are keeping half his inheritance away from him.
    (over &50,000) I'm beyond angry. I did one banishment spell and at least they are not playing tug of war with him anymore....
    but stymied on what to attempt next. Just blue days......
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  6. #46
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    It is easy to cast some runes as benevolent spirits of light and love. Thurisaz is not one of those runes. The Thorn has the personality of a rabid pit bull with a toothache. It will gladly tear into anything you send it after, and if you aren't careful it will turn around and chew you up as well.

    This is not to say that Thurisaz is "evil." Trying to classify runes using terms which are intended to apply to human behavior can only result in confusion. Forest fires, dam breaks and volcanic eruptions have no malicious intent: the meteor which wiped out the dinosaurs and the plagues which reshaped European culture were neither kind nor cruel. Thurisaz is harsh and terrifying, but it is also a necessary part of the order of things. It is the predator which keeps the populations of deer and rabbits in check and the famine and disease which takes over that role when the predators are hunted to extinction. We avoid it, or treat it with sentimentality, at our own peril. If we understand its power and its place it can be a mighty ally: if we are careless, it can become a deadly, implacable foe.

    A thorn can penetrate thick hide because it concentrates weight and force to a tiny point. This is the lesson of Thurisaz: it is enormous energy brought to bear on a small area. The teeth that rend the throat, the keen sword-edge that slices through armor, the blast points that knock down granite hills all show the influence of Thurisaz. Thurisaz is a great breaker of obstacles: wielded wisely, it can blast away barriers (internal and external) which stand in our way. It is not wild and untamed savagery, but fierceness brought to bear on a specific target.

    Thurisaz can also be used to weave a nearly impenetrable wall of thorns around the runecaster. It is an aggressive and unrelenting defense, one that wears down attackers and can subject them to a "death by a thousand cuts." It can entangle an enemy in the briars and slow them down, or it can get inside them and rip them to shreds. If your foes are not strong enough to stand against Thurisaz, the rune will happily treat them as prey and feast on them. (This is not a side of Thurisaz which should be invoked likely: once you've put it on the scent, it will be difficult if not impossible to turn it aside should you have second thoughts about the attack).

    Thurisaz is also identified as "Thurse," an archaic term for the Jotuns or giants of Nordic and Germanic legend. This is another key to understanding its nature. The Jotuns are fierce, primal forces of nature, red in tooth and claw. They are terrifying enemies but can also be great friends to those they deem worthy. Thurisaz is a rune which will not be wielded by the weak and it can find your faults like a predator sensing a wounded animal. If you are strong enough to earn its respect, if you can raise your rage and passion and keep it in focus rather than letting it scatter, if you can maintain your awareness and anger simultaneously, Thurisaz will be a powerful guardian. If you are willing to give it your weakness in exchange for its strength Thurisaz will be a wise if sometimes sadistic teacher: its lessons may be painful but they will be lasting.

    When working with any of the runes, it is advisable to "redden" them or give them a few drops of your blood. For Thurisaz it is damned near mandatory. This is a rune which likes the taste of blood and will respond best after being properly fed. It should be approached with caution, but if you are going to work with the runes it must be approached. It will teach you to be ruthless when pity would be weakness, and to hone your emotions to a point rather than letting them diffuse into impotent rage or meaningless posturing. It is not a kind or a gentle rune, but it reminds us that the universe is not always a kind or a gentle place and that mercy is a luxury which must often be earned by force.
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  7. #47
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    Please see explanation post in tarot card of the day... be back on track soon.. (fingers crossed)
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  8. #48
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    Literal Meanings of "Mannaz"

    Man, Humankind
    Description

    Mannaz symbolizes all of humanity, joined together for the purposes of attaining a common goal. On a more personal scale, Mannaz may represent our circle of family and friends -- and the common goals which unite us. An intertwining of man and woman is also referenced here, and a combining of their souls into a single entity. On a philosophical level -- Mannaz reminds us that we are one. All purposes and goals ultimately flow into a greater purpose which is shared by all mankind.
    How to Interpret "Mannaz"

    Mannaz represents a group of people, most frequently the community immediately surrounding the individual -- and often references the ways in which that group perceives the individual in question. Friends are being made and a community is being formed and served. The individual is giving a part of themselves up for the greater good. If a reading deals with great tasks, the appearance of Mannaz often indicates that assistance will come from others. This rune may also refer to a spiritual community, such as that of a church or a religious group of some kind; the individual may be interacting with this new community soon. The appearance of Mannaz frequently signifies the intensification and betterment of the person's relationships with people and community. This often refers just to social relationships, rather than business or romantic relationships. The appearance of this rune suggests that the important factor may not necessarily be the individual doing the reading, but the people in his or her immediate sphere of contacts. While many runes deal with the individual, Mannaz is a reminder to step back and consider a larger group -- the family or community. Mannaz also directly relates to an individual's place within a community, how he or she performs, and how he or she is perceived.
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  9. #49
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    The Gospel of John begins with "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God." The Egyptians believed that Ptah dreamed creation in his heart, then spoke it into being. The Hopi believed that Tawa and Spider Woman brought the world into existence by singing their Creation Song. We embody our thoughts when we mold them into words and symbols: our speech, our singing, our communication is a reflection of the Great Shaping which brought order out of chaos and form out of formlessness.

    Ansuz governs speech and communications: it holds the key to the relations between the worlds of the Sacred and Profane, and to the forces which enabled us to shape civilization and to transmit our knowledge to our community and our heirs. Ansuz is the rune which allows us to put our wisdom to use: we cannot learn without listening and we cannot teach without speaking. And in its highest form, Ansuz is also the Rune which contains the secret of all the other Runes.

    When he hung on Yggdrasil for nine days and nine nights, Odin gained knowledge of the primal forces which shaped the universe. He also gained a way by which he could create bodies for them and speak with them directly. These bodies were the symbols which we call the Runes: by drawing them and reddening them with blood, we give form to the force. Much as Vodouisants will "tie a paket," a bundle of herbs and sacred objects which contains a spirit, the rune contains a living and sentient force which can allow us both to read the world and to make changes within it. By his sacrifice Odin established communication between us and the formless forces of the Runes. Our use of language is a reflection in the lower realms of that holy sacrifice.

    Ansuz reminds us that our words are sacred: they give life to our ideas and allow us to change the world. Words can bring down empires and defeat armies: those who doubt this need only consider Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" and "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speeches. But words can also work powerful evil. The politician who deflects honest criticism with convincing lies; the priest raising an Easter pogrom against his congregation's Jewish neighbors; the smooth-talking pimp corrupting an innocent - all these draw upon the power of Ansuz. Ansuz gives us the power to communicate and persuade: it also gives us the responsibility to choose our speech wisely.

    Much as Odin spoke with the Runes, Ansuz allows us to speak with - and for - the Gods. If Wunjo is the rune of the Mystic, Ansuz is the rune of the Prophet. It allows us to act as the vessel by which the Divine speaks to mortals. (This is no easy path to follow: history shows that many a seer came to an unpleasant end and many hard prophecies were rejected in favor of soothing lies until they could no longer be ignored). Writers and artists can call on Ansuz for access to the Sacred Wisdom and the truths which elevate work from merely competent into divinely inspired.

    On a more mundane level, Ansuz can help us to establish a connection with those we wish to persuade. It can be called upon to alleviate misunderstandings and to find a diplomatic way to convey difficult information. Those who work on computers may find it a useful ally in making sure bits and bytes are transmitted clearly: it can help you to find and fix the flaws in your network. And if you are being targeted by slander or gossip, Ansuz can help to ensure that both truth and lies are revealed.
    [SIGPIC] Kim



  10. #50
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    As Rhett Butler walked out of her life, Scarlett O'Hara said "Tara! Home. I'll go home. And I'll think of some way to get him back. After all... tomorrow is another day." Dagaz is the rune of that day. It is the fresh start, the new beginning, the dawn which marks the first day of the rest of your life.

    Daybreak has always carried connotations of joy and renewal. (Grieg caught this beautifully in the "Daybreak" movement of his Peer Gynt: so too did Sibelius with his tone poem "Night Ride and Sunrise" and Wagner with his "Siegfried Idyll"). Dagaz is a joyful rune, one which is full of hope and promise. It is the sun which rises after a pitched battle, letting you know that you have made it through the worst of things and lived to fight another day. While it marks the close of a cycle, it is not the final ending of Ear or the eternal return of Jera. Dagaz leaves you with that which you have already gained, then adds still more to your riches.

    The Northern view of the world placed a great emphasis on wyrd, the fate which you weave for yourself from the situation into which you were born and the hand you were dealt. Dagaz does not free us from our wyrd. The dawn does not erase the debts we incurred the night before. While we must still bear the consequences of our mistakes, we need not repeat them. If you are struggling with addictions or compulsive behavior, Dagaz can help you find the strength to face them and overcome them. It can give you the clarity to recognize your failings and provide you with a way out of the thickets in which you have entangled yourself. You may have failed a thousand times before: Dagaz tells you that you need not fail again.

    If you have been struggling through a spiritual or material crisis, Dagaz can come as the light at the end of the tunnel. The gloom is about to disperse: the dark night of the soul is giving way. This will typically happen quickly: the change will be less abrupt and shattering than Sowilo's lightning-strike but faster than the gradual developments of Jera. Used in healing magic, Dagaz can provide the strength to finally shake a lingering infection. It can be an excellent rune for those seeking a new job: it can put you in touch with the employer who will notice your resume when hundreds have ignored it. And if you've been grappling for an answer to a thorny problem or struggling with a creative project, Dagaz can provide you with that moment of illumination when everything falls into place.

    But these new beginnings may not be entirely pleasant. Like Sowilo, another rune connected with the sun, Dagaz is a bringer of light. That which was hidden in darkness may stand exposed in the cold light of day. If you are not ready for the dawn, Dagaz can mark the "morning after" hangover. For all its promise, Dagaz is implacable. Daybreak comes whether we plan for it or not. We cannot turn back time or stop the sun on its course. If we don't wake up and smell the coffee, we may be caught napping by those who were better prepared. In a reading Dagaz can function as an alarm clock, warning you that the Day of Reckoning is coming and you had best be ready.
    [SIGPIC] Kim



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